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The Mandalorian Discussion Thread - * SPOILERS * — Page 12

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Yeah, at least taking Yoda painfully literally, he died at 900 after 800 years of training Jedi.

Well done. I will disengage self-destruct initiative.

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 (Edited)

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

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canofhumdingers said:

Yeah, we know. We’ve discussed it all already. Shogun Assassin is just a film compiled from parts of the first two Lone Wolf and Cub films, edited together for American theatrical release. Magnificent Seven is just “reused material” (to quote you) from Seven Samurai set in the American West rather than Feudal Japan.

Did you know Star Wars (1977) is just a bunch of standard hero and myth tropes jumbled together with a bit of fantasy, western, and samurai genres all blended together? Did you know Fistful of Dollars is just a spaghetti western remake of Yojimbo? Things reuse ideas from previous things. Omg! There’s a reason the word “tropes” exits…

The issue is, how well does THIS media execute those ideas? I thought episode 5 was possibly the weakest so far. I still liked it, but it definitely had some issues with the casting and maybe the directing imo. I still think episode 2 and 3 were the high point so far but this is still a very fun series! I’m sad we’ve got only, what, two more to go this season?

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.
Not only copy paste, like The Madalorian. They used the base material and reshaped it to something far better, that you can not even recognize, only after careful examination. That is why they become well known pictures, just as Star Wars (aka A New Hope), and were selected for preservation by The National Film Registry.
The Mandalorian does nothing but copy paste the basics, and leaves out the substance that made the original great. And everyone knows what was copied.
It is more like an Asylum production, instead of a part of a great franchise.

And do you really want to watch the budget version of some great movie, that every one recognizes right away, instead of something so creative and so interesting that you don’t even realize that you’ve seen this before, told in another way?

The only entertaining element in The Mandalorian is that it is placed in the Star Wars universe that we love.
If you read the positive comments, all you can find that every one loves to see Tatooine, the Jawas, or the baby that looks like Yoda 750 years ago.
Nobody talks about how great the story is. But shouldn’t that be the main thing?

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RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

You say that Luke could not stop and levitate the Rancor because he did not believe he can do it? Despite that Yoda taught him the opposite?
And what about Anakin and Obi-wan? They could not stop the charging monsters either.
And if this babyYoda is so much stronger, then how come that no Jedi ever sensed it’s presence in the Force, nor did Palpatine who sensed a seemingly much weaker Luke.

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 (Edited)

Sifo Dyas said:

canofhumdingers said:

Yeah, we know. We’ve discussed it all already. Shogun Assassin is just a film compiled from parts of the first two Lone Wolf and Cub films, edited together for American theatrical release. Magnificent Seven is just “reused material” (to quote you) from Seven Samurai set in the American West rather than Feudal Japan.

Did you know Star Wars (1977) is just a bunch of standard hero and myth tropes jumbled together with a bit of fantasy, western, and samurai genres all blended together? Did you know Fistful of Dollars is just a spaghetti western remake of Yojimbo? Things reuse ideas from previous things. Omg! There’s a reason the word “tropes” exits…

The issue is, how well does THIS media execute those ideas? I thought episode 5 was possibly the weakest so far. I still liked it, but it definitely had some issues with the casting and maybe the directing imo. I still think episode 2 and 3 were the high point so far but this is still a very fun series! I’m sad we’ve got only, what, two more to go this season?

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.

What makes you think that’s true? If you’ve never, by your own admission, even heard of them? Because I assure you it is not.

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RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

This exactly. There’s a lot of evidence from the movies (especially the prequels) which points to early training as extremely important in developing skill in the Force, and I think you’re right that it has to do with the lack of a rigid experiential framework present in adults. So if the Yoda species has this super long developmental period, it stands to reason that most of the members of this species would gain some Force abilities. I imagine it could be something like 50% or more of the species would have this ability into adulthood, while for humans that percentage would be far less because of how rapidly they progress through infancy. Of course, I doubt that baby Yoda could really control the Force or plan to use it in advance.

There’s also the angle of hereditary Force sensitivity, and it may be that Yoda’s species is essentially just one family, that is if their method of reproduction is different enough to avoid the effects of inbreeding.

It’s an interesting question.

What a grand and intoxicating innocence. How could you be so naive? There is no escape. Come, lay down your weapons. It is not too late for my mercy.
Episode 9 Rewrite THE SHATTERED SWORD (Complete!)
The Force Awakens Restructured (V3 Released!) and The Starlight Project (WORKPRINT RELEASED!)

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Sifo Dyas said:

RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

You say that Luke could not stop and levitate the Rancor because he did not believe he can do it? Despite that Yoda taught him the opposite?
And what about Anakin and Obi-wan? They could not stop the charging monsters either.
And if this babyYoda is so much stronger, then how come that no Jedi ever sensed it’s presence in the Force, nor did Palpatine who sensed a seemingly much weaker Luke.

I mean, Yoda tells Luke that “size matters not”, and the difference between lifting a rock and a ship was “only different in your mind”. So what is the difference between a ship and a rancor?

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 (Edited)

NeverarGreat said:

RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

This exactly. There’s a lot of evidence from the movies (especially the prequels) which points to early training as extremely important in developing skill in the Force, and I think you’re right that it has to do with the lack of a rigid experiential framework present in adults. So if the Yoda species has this super long developmental period, it stands to reason that most of the members of this species would gain some Force abilities. I imagine it could be something like 50% or more of the species would have this ability into adulthood, while for humans that percentage would be far less because of how rapidly they progress through infancy. Of course, I doubt that baby Yoda could really control the Force or plan to use it in advance.

There’s also the angle of hereditary Force sensitivity, and it may be that Yoda’s species is essentially just one family, that is if their method of reproduction is different enough to avoid the effects of inbreeding.

It’s an interesting question.

It really is! I think it highlights the uniqueness of the Force as a “magic system”. Yoda’s ESB philosophy that stresses faith and belief clearly has a fantasy leaning, but the idea of the Force “being strong” in a family has a more scientific, genetic angle.

Although, the power of a bloodline is a mythic trope as well. I know there is a lot of examples in legends, but are there many examples in canon where we see Force-sensitive bloodlines? I believe the protagonist in the new novel Force Collector has a grandfather who was a Jedi, but that is all I can think of currently. Could the connection between Force powers and bloodline be less common than we think?

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 (Edited)

DominicCobb said:

Sifo Dyas said:

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.

What makes you think that’s true? If you’ve never, by your own admission, even heard of them? Because I assure you it is not.

Oof I’m glad you got to this before I did. Yojimbo is a SPECTACULAR film and very much the better of the two.

Jedit: oh geez, I just realized he’s also implying Magnificent Seven is an improvement over Seven Samurai…! Egad!

Return of the jedit:
I should’ve read his whole post before commenting! If you didn’t realize that Magnificent Seven was a blatant remake of Seven Samurai, then you had never seen Seven Samurai. Same goes for Yojimbo/Fistful of Dollars.

Your argument is preposterous. I stand by my statement that it doesn’t matter if it’s been done before, all that matters is how well THIS version does it.

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canofhumdingers said:

DominicCobb said:

Sifo Dyas said:

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.

What makes you think that’s true? If you’ve never, by your own admission, even heard of them? Because I assure you it is not.

Oof I’m glad you got to this before I did. Yojimbo is a SPECTACULAR film and very much the better of the two.

Jedit: oh geez, I just realized he’s also implying Magnificent Seven is an improvement over Seven Samurai…! Egad!

Return of the jedit:
I should’ve read his whole post before commenting! If you didn’t realize that Magnificent Seven was a blatant remake of Seven Samurai, then you had never seen Seven Samurai. Same goes for Yojimbo/Fistful of Dollars.

Your argument is preposterous. I stand by my statement that it doesn’t matter if it’s been done before, all that matters is how well THIS version does it.

Yes, not only are the Kurosawa films much better than the western remakes, the idea that it’s only one or the other is baffling. It’s okay to like a film and its remake. Remakes are not replacements.

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RogueLeader said:

NeverarGreat said:

RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

This exactly. There’s a lot of evidence from the movies (especially the prequels) which points to early training as extremely important in developing skill in the Force, and I think you’re right that it has to do with the lack of a rigid experiential framework present in adults. So if the Yoda species has this super long developmental period, it stands to reason that most of the members of this species would gain some Force abilities. I imagine it could be something like 50% or more of the species would have this ability into adulthood, while for humans that percentage would be far less because of how rapidly they progress through infancy. Of course, I doubt that baby Yoda could really control the Force or plan to use it in advance.

There’s also the angle of hereditary Force sensitivity, and it may be that Yoda’s species is essentially just one family, that is if their method of reproduction is different enough to avoid the effects of inbreeding.

It’s an interesting question.

It really is! I think it highlights the uniqueness of the Force as a “magic system”. Yoda’s ESB philosophy that stresses faith and belief clearly has a fantasy leaning, but the idea of the Force “being strong” in a family has a more scientific, genetic angle.

I definitely like the idea that a baby might be especially sensitive because they are free of inhibitions. A lot of people complain but it makes sense that the Jedi would snap up babies for training (and why it would be hard for someone’s Luke’s age to learn). It’s like learning a language.

Personally, the speculation is all well and good but I hope they don’t try to explain it too much. The Force works in mysterious ways and always should.

Although, the power of a bloodline is a mythic trope as well. I know there is a lot of examples in legends, but are there many examples in canon where we see Force-sensitive bloodlines? I believe the protagonist in the new novel Force Collector has a grandfather who was a Jedi, but that is all I can think of currently. Could the connection between Force powers and bloodline be less common than we think?

Well if you think about it, the Jedi are supposed to be celibate so hypothetically the bloodline thing shouldn’t really be much of a thing in the universe.

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DominicCobb said:

RogueLeader said:

NeverarGreat said:

RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

This exactly. There’s a lot of evidence from the movies (especially the prequels) which points to early training as extremely important in developing skill in the Force, and I think you’re right that it has to do with the lack of a rigid experiential framework present in adults. So if the Yoda species has this super long developmental period, it stands to reason that most of the members of this species would gain some Force abilities. I imagine it could be something like 50% or more of the species would have this ability into adulthood, while for humans that percentage would be far less because of how rapidly they progress through infancy. Of course, I doubt that baby Yoda could really control the Force or plan to use it in advance.

There’s also the angle of hereditary Force sensitivity, and it may be that Yoda’s species is essentially just one family, that is if their method of reproduction is different enough to avoid the effects of inbreeding.

It’s an interesting question.

It really is! I think it highlights the uniqueness of the Force as a “magic system”. Yoda’s ESB philosophy that stresses faith and belief clearly has a fantasy leaning, but the idea of the Force “being strong” in a family has a more scientific, genetic angle.

I definitely like the idea that a baby might be especially sensitive because they are free of inhibitions. A lot of people complain but it makes sense that the Jedi would snap up babies for training (and why it would be hard for someone’s Luke’s age to learn). It’s like learning a language.

That’s a great comparison actually! At an old job my boss told me sometimes it is easier to train a new person than a person with experience, because the person with experience will have their own certain way of doing things that might be hard for them to unlearn. Which is exactly what Yoda says to Luke, “You must unlearn what you have learned.”

Personally, the speculation is all well and good but I hope they don’t try to explain it too much. The Force works in mysterious ways and always should.

Although, the power of a bloodline is a mythic trope as well. I know there is a lot of examples in legends, but are there many examples in canon where we see Force-sensitive bloodlines? I believe the protagonist in the new novel Force Collector has a grandfather who was a Jedi, but that is all I can think of currently. Could the connection between Force powers and bloodline be less common than we think?

Well if you think about it, the Jedi are supposed to be celibate so hypothetically the bloodline thing shouldn’t really be much of a thing in the universe.

I totally agree. I don’t want it to be explained, but I do want it to be explored. I want Jedi and Sith to have contradictory views on the Force. I would like to see the Force treated like real religions with various interpretations, without one necessarily being singled out as “the right one”.

There could be a lot of reasons why the Jedi practice celibacy. The main reason being attachment. It’s possible that the child of a Jedi isn’t necessarily any more likely to also be a Jedi (or more gifted) than a normal child. I could also see there being a fear of dynasty, whether that has to do with literal power regarding their bloodline, or just the consolidation of power under a family name and the attachment that comes with having power and a family. I could see their being an interesting Old Republic story that deals with the implications of a Jedi dynasty.

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RogueLeader said:

I could also see there being a fear of dynasty, whether that has to do with literal power regarding their bloodline, or just the consolidation of power under a family name and the attachment that comes with having power and a family. I could see their being an interesting Old Republic story that deals with the implications of a Jedi dynasty.

I haven’t played it yet but I think that’s the basis behind The Knights of the Fallen Empire expansion for SWTOR.

originaltrilogy.com Moderator

Stepping softly in a danger zone…

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DominicCobb said:

Sifo Dyas said:

canofhumdingers said:

Yeah, we know. We’ve discussed it all already. Shogun Assassin is just a film compiled from parts of the first two Lone Wolf and Cub films, edited together for American theatrical release. Magnificent Seven is just “reused material” (to quote you) from Seven Samurai set in the American West rather than Feudal Japan.

Did you know Star Wars (1977) is just a bunch of standard hero and myth tropes jumbled together with a bit of fantasy, western, and samurai genres all blended together? Did you know Fistful of Dollars is just a spaghetti western remake of Yojimbo? Things reuse ideas from previous things. Omg! There’s a reason the word “tropes” exits…

The issue is, how well does THIS media execute those ideas? I thought episode 5 was possibly the weakest so far. I still liked it, but it definitely had some issues with the casting and maybe the directing imo. I still think episode 2 and 3 were the high point so far but this is still a very fun series! I’m sad we’ve got only, what, two more to go this season?

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.

What makes you think that’s true? If you’ve never, by your own admission, even heard of them? Because I assure you it is not.

I literally said I did not hear about Yojimbo.
It means I heard about all the others.
What the hell you smokin?
Own admission?
Can you even read properly?

You say the Magnificent seven is not better then the Seven Samurai?
That Star Wars is not better then the Hidden Fortress?
Wow. Ok. Good bye.

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RogueLeader said:

Sifo Dyas said:

RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

You say that Luke could not stop and levitate the Rancor because he did not believe he can do it? Despite that Yoda taught him the opposite?
And what about Anakin and Obi-wan? They could not stop the charging monsters either.
And if this babyYoda is so much stronger, then how come that no Jedi ever sensed it’s presence in the Force, nor did Palpatine who sensed a seemingly much weaker Luke.

I mean, Yoda tells Luke that “size matters not”, and the difference between lifting a rock and a ship was “only different in your mind”. So what is the difference between a ship and a rancor?

This is all just guessing, but it could be that it’s harder to do with moving things than stationary objects. It’s easier to concentrate on an immobile object than something that’s running straight at you or at high speed, if the concentration goes to cellular lever or something. And the yoddler is just better at it, somehow at this point.

And in the time of greatest despair, there shall come a savior, and he shall be known as the Son of the Suns.

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Sifo Dyas said:

DominicCobb said:

Sifo Dyas said:

canofhumdingers said:

Yeah, we know. We’ve discussed it all already. Shogun Assassin is just a film compiled from parts of the first two Lone Wolf and Cub films, edited together for American theatrical release. Magnificent Seven is just “reused material” (to quote you) from Seven Samurai set in the American West rather than Feudal Japan.

Did you know Star Wars (1977) is just a bunch of standard hero and myth tropes jumbled together with a bit of fantasy, western, and samurai genres all blended together? Did you know Fistful of Dollars is just a spaghetti western remake of Yojimbo? Things reuse ideas from previous things. Omg! There’s a reason the word “tropes” exits…

The issue is, how well does THIS media execute those ideas? I thought episode 5 was possibly the weakest so far. I still liked it, but it definitely had some issues with the casting and maybe the directing imo. I still think episode 2 and 3 were the high point so far but this is still a very fun series! I’m sad we’ve got only, what, two more to go this season?

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.

What makes you think that’s true? If you’ve never, by your own admission, even heard of them? Because I assure you it is not.

I literally said I did not hear about Yojimbo.
It means I heard about all the others.
What the hell you smokin?
Own admission?
Can you even read properly?

You say the Magnificent seven is not better then the Seven Samurai?
That Star Wars is not better then the Hidden Fortress?
Wow. Ok. Good bye.

Don’t forget your ‘case’, and to also cancel your subscription to Disney+ yet again 😉

50 Cent is just an imposter

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 (Edited)

RogueLeader said:

Sifo Dyas said:

RogueLeader said:

It is still a child. I don’t think it translates
1:1 with human aging, but this species has a particularly long infancy-early childhood stage.

There might be something unique to the Yoda species regarding Force sensitivity, but it’s already been established in canon that Force-sensitive babies in general have a predisposition to using the Force, regardless of species. The idea being, I’m assuming, that babies and young children lack some of the qualities that adults have that can hold back their ability to use the Force (like doubt or disbelief). And it is possible that the time he spends in this young childhood stage plays a part in why he can lift a mudhorn vs a toy ball.

You say that Luke could not stop and levitate the Rancor because he did not believe he can do it? Despite that Yoda taught him the opposite?
And what about Anakin and Obi-wan? They could not stop the charging monsters either.
And if this babyYoda is so much stronger, then how come that no Jedi ever sensed it’s presence in the Force, nor did Palpatine who sensed a seemingly much weaker Luke.

I mean, Yoda tells Luke that “size matters not”, and the difference between lifting a rock and a ship was “only different in your mind”. So what is the difference between a ship and a rancor?

Yoda and Obi-wan are lying liars who lie. As the Mandalorians say “It is the way.”
And if you watch carefully you can see that size matters. Weight matters.
Yoda needs to concentrate hard to lift that X-wing. Do you think that it would take the same amount of effort to levitate a rock? Luke certainly does not, as he can levitate rocks and Artoo, but can barely raise the X-wing a bit.
And in another scene Yoda really struggles with that huge metal thing that Dooku throws at Obi-wan and Anakin.
So if it would be true that “size matters not”, these things would not happen.
The explanation here is that Yoda merely tries to motivate Luke, so he can believe in himself, which is very important for being able to do very difficult things.
Good coaches do this all the time.

To answer your question, the difference between a ship and a rancor in this regard is nothing. Luke can’t do neither.
The problem is that babyYoda can, which makes it one of the strongest Force user in the galaxy. Only one of the strongest, because I don’t know if Yoda or Palpi could stop and levitate a charging monster. Vader/Anakin could not.
And as I said, knowing the circumstances this is impossible.

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 (Edited)

V.I.N.Cent said:

Sifo Dyas said:

DominicCobb said:

Sifo Dyas said:

canofhumdingers said:

Yeah, we know. We’ve discussed it all already. Shogun Assassin is just a film compiled from parts of the first two Lone Wolf and Cub films, edited together for American theatrical release. Magnificent Seven is just “reused material” (to quote you) from Seven Samurai set in the American West rather than Feudal Japan.

Did you know Star Wars (1977) is just a bunch of standard hero and myth tropes jumbled together with a bit of fantasy, western, and samurai genres all blended together? Did you know Fistful of Dollars is just a spaghetti western remake of Yojimbo? Things reuse ideas from previous things. Omg! There’s a reason the word “tropes” exits…

The issue is, how well does THIS media execute those ideas? I thought episode 5 was possibly the weakest so far. I still liked it, but it definitely had some issues with the casting and maybe the directing imo. I still think episode 2 and 3 were the high point so far but this is still a very fun series! I’m sad we’ve got only, what, two more to go this season?

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.

What makes you think that’s true? If you’ve never, by your own admission, even heard of them? Because I assure you it is not.

I literally said I did not hear about Yojimbo.
It means I heard about all the others.
What the hell you smokin?
Own admission?
Can you even read properly?

You say the Magnificent seven is not better then the Seven Samurai?
That Star Wars is not better then the Hidden Fortress?
Wow. Ok. Good bye.

Don’t forget your ‘case’, and to also cancel your subscription to Disney+ yet again 😉

Smart arguments are fine, but there is no need for stupid advice from haters.
And you can pay Disney as much as you want, I don’t care, but I envy you, that you are not hindered by your brain, so you can enjoy crap.

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 (Edited)

Sifo Dyas said:

V.I.N.Cent said:

Sifo Dyas said:

DominicCobb said:

Sifo Dyas said:

canofhumdingers said:

Yeah, we know. We’ve discussed it all already. Shogun Assassin is just a film compiled from parts of the first two Lone Wolf and Cub films, edited together for American theatrical release. Magnificent Seven is just “reused material” (to quote you) from Seven Samurai set in the American West rather than Feudal Japan.

Did you know Star Wars (1977) is just a bunch of standard hero and myth tropes jumbled together with a bit of fantasy, western, and samurai genres all blended together? Did you know Fistful of Dollars is just a spaghetti western remake of Yojimbo? Things reuse ideas from previous things. Omg! There’s a reason the word “tropes” exits…

The issue is, how well does THIS media execute those ideas? I thought episode 5 was possibly the weakest so far. I still liked it, but it definitely had some issues with the casting and maybe the directing imo. I still think episode 2 and 3 were the high point so far but this is still a very fun series! I’m sad we’ve got only, what, two more to go this season?

I didn’t know about this Yojimbo film, but I guess for a good reason.

If you reuse something you should make it better, as all of those pictures you mentioned here did.

What makes you think that’s true? If you’ve never, by your own admission, even heard of them? Because I assure you it is not.

I literally said I did not hear about Yojimbo.
It means I heard about all the others.
What the hell you smokin?
Own admission?
Can you even read properly?

You say the Magnificent seven is not better then the Seven Samurai?
That Star Wars is not better then the Hidden Fortress?
Wow. Ok. Good bye.

Don’t forget your ‘case’, and to also cancel your subscription to Disney+ yet again 😉

Smart arguments are fine, but there is no need for stupid advice from haters.
And you can pay Disney as much as you want, I don’t care, but I envy you, that you are not hindered by your brain, so you can enjoy crap.

There is no need for posts from socks and trolls either.

originaltrilogy.com Moderator

 
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