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The Big List of Changes to the Star Wars films

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 (Edited)

I think this might be useful reference for people who have questions about all the sound mixes and theatrical/SE/DVD changes. Please submit any corrections that may be needed.

 

STAR WARS:

 

The first version of STAR WARS was released in 32 theaters on May 25th, 1977. This version had no “Episode IV: A New Hope” subtitle in the opening crawl, and was reportedly missing the scene where Chewbacca scares the mouse droid (which was added soon after the opening day).

Here’s a site with great info on the intial release:

http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/star_wars_a_day_long_remembered.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20120118084334/fromscripttodvd.com/star_wars_a_day_long_remembered.htm

http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/star_wars_70mm_engagements.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20160807150454/http://fromscripttodvd.com/star_wars_70mm_engagements.htm
 

There were three audio mixes, and whichever print was used depended on how a given theater was equipped.

  1. 35mm stereo (optical, two-track/four-channel)

  2. 35mm stereo (magnetic, four-track)

  3. 70mm stereo (magnetic, six-track)

The 35mm and 70mm mixes are essentially the same, except that the 70mm track had additional sound channels. Also, some minor enhancements/changes were made for the 35mm stereo versions, since those versions would be heard in more theaters than the prestigious 70mm version.

  1. 35mm mono (optical)

The most work went into the mono mix, since that was the version that would be heard in most theaters (because monaural speakers were the standard in theaters at that time). This version has additional/alternate lines of dialogue (such as Luke saying “Blast it, Wedge, where are you?” instead of “Blast it, Biggs…” during the Death Star battle, and a Stormtrooper saying “Close the blast doors!” on the Death Star while chasing Han and Chewbacca), a different voice for Aunt Beru, and added sound effects.

This mono mix is the version that went into wide release in the summer of 1977.

Amazingly enough, despite being the “definitive” mix for the film in 1977, this mono version has faded into obscurity. It was never released on video/laserdisc/DVD (in the US, at least), and is only available through low-quality bootlegs today.

 

 

Here’s a great site that has audio clip comparisons of the different mixes:

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/russdawson/mono/ or http://web.archive.org/web/20160126121513/http://homepage.ntlworld.com/russdawson/mono/
 

For the 1981 theatrical re-release, the opening crawl was reshot, and “Episode IV: A New Hope” was added. It has appeared in all subsequent versions. Lucas has said that he’d always wanted the subtitle included, but studio execs forced him to omit it, since they feared that audiences would be confused by it. Once the film became a success, and Lucas had more clout, he put it back in. The title appears at the head of the screenplay published in “The Art of Star Wars” (1979), which lends credence to the notion that it was intended to be there from the start.

The original Dolby stereo (70mm/35mm) mix(es) was used for all VHS and Betamax releases until 1985.

In 1985, Ben Burtt remixed the film, combining elements of all mixes. The result is bascially the Dolby Stereo mix, but with added sound effects and dialogue (most notably, C-3PO’s lines: “The tractor beam is coupled to the main reactor in seven locations. A power loss at one of the terminals will allow the ship to leave.”) that had previously been exclusive to the mono mix.

The 1985 mix was used for all releases until 1993.

In 1993, the film was remixed by Burtt once again for the “Definitive Collection” laserdisc boxset. This mix is based mainly on the original 70mm Stereo mix, but with elements from the 35mm and mono versions (as well as brand-new sound effects not heard in any previous version) tossed in. Threepio’s tractor beam lines are missing again.
 

There are some significant differences between the 1985 and 1993 mixes. Here are a few:

1. 1993 version has added sounds for the opening ship-to-ship battle, and an added explosion sound which prompts Threepio to enter the escape pod.

2. 1993: Some added Artoo/Chewie “dialogue” in various scenes (taken from the mono mix).

2. 1993: New asteroid/TIE laser sound effects when the Falcon comes out of hyperspace.

3. 1993: Many new “breaking glass” sounds added to the detention block camera explosions.

This mix was reused for the 1995 “Last chance to own the original trilogy” VHS and laserdisc releases.

For the 1997 Special Edition, Burtt remixed the film yet again. This was an attempt to combine the best of all prior mixes, as well as adding to/enhancing the soundtrack (and adding effects and music to the newly inserted/extended scenes). Thus, dialogue and sounds that people hadn’t heard since 1977 ( such as “Close the blast doors!”) were added back into the film.

And, of course, the film was radically altered. New scenes and CG effects were added, existing scenes were enhanced with CG effects, most of the original opticals were recomposited with the original elements to increase the image quality/clarity (and eliminate matte lines and other artifacts), and the color timing was redone.

 

 

Here’s a great site (which hasn’t been updated in several years, unfortunately) that has side-by-side comparisons of most of the changes made for the 1997 SE:

http://home.earthlink.net/~treadwell_jay/starwars/anhindex.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20080429220044/http://home.earthlink.net/~treadwell_jay/starwars/anhindex.htm

 

 

For the 2004 Star Wars Trilogy DVD set, the film was remixed into 5.1 surround sound. Some new sound effects were added here and there (for example, new clashing sounds have been added to the Vader/Kenobi duel). Many people complained about how, in this version, the music fades out when the X-Wings make their initial swoop toward the Death Star (when a bold version of “Ben’s Theme” is supposed to be heard).

Some new visual effects and changes were also added, including a new CG Jabba the Hutt to replace the 1997 version. The color timing was also redone by Lowry Digital to help the original trilogy visually match the prequels in terms of color saturation/constrast.

 

Here’s the official Star Wars website’s breakdown of changes made for both the 1997 SE and the 2004 DVD…

http://www.starwars.com/episode-iv/release/video/f20060825/index.html or http://web.archive.org/web/20080325163706/http://www.starwars.com/episode-iv/release/video/f20060825/index.html
 

…and an unofficial site’s comparison:

http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-one.html or http://web.archive.org/web/20180601013736/http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-one.html

The 2004 trilogy DVD set was re-released in 2005 without the bonus disc (and with new packaging).

 

 

The 2006 individual DVD releases of the three films are just reissues of the 2004 discs. However, each 2-disc set included a (non-anamorphic) bonus disc containing one of the “original, unaltered” movies.

These “original” versions are just the 1993 laserdisc masters, with the same sound mixes and image quality from the so-called “Definitive Collection”. The only difference between the 2006 DVD and the “Definitive Collection” laserdisc is the original opening crawl (which lacks the “Episode IV” subtitle), which was tacked onto the beginning of the movie (and which also allows the musical “crash” to be properly in sync with the reveal of Tatooine, as it was originally, before the “ANH” subtitle was added in 1981).

The disc’s optional Spanish and French audio tracks (which were probably dug out of the Lucasfilm Archives for this Limited Edition release), however, are based on the rarely-heard MONO sound mix from 1977.
 

How do I know?

Threepio says the famous tractor beam lines (in French/Spanish), dialogue that does not appear in the 1993 mix.

Luke (albeit speaking in French/Spanish) says, “Blast it, Wedge, where are you?” (as he does in the mono mix), as opposed to, “Blast it, Biggs, where are you?” as he does in all other versions of the movie.

The Falcon’s chessboard creatures make some different sounds than they do in all other versions of the movie (these sounds are from the mono mix).

The additional Falcon cockpit beeping sounds (and the whizzing asteroid sounds heard as the ship comes out of hyperspace) that were originally exclusive to the mono mix (and were added back in for the 1997 SE) can be heard on the Spanish and French tracks.

On the 2004 DVD, the Spanish language audio track is completely new, and uses the 2004 SE sound mix as its basis.

However, the French audio track is the same one that appears on the “bonus disc” (This version is still based on the original mono mix, with the same French-speaking voice actors as can be heard on the “bonus disc”. In this version, French-speaking Luke still says, “Blast it, Wedge, where are you?”, while on the new Spanish track, he says, “Blast it, Biggs, where are you?”, as in the 2004 SE.), but with the SE material spliced in at the appropriate spots! It seems they even used different voice actors for the added scenes and dialogue (such as Han’s voice in the restored Jabba scene)!

But, aside from the SE audio additions, the original sound effects for the Vader/Kenobi duel can still be heard on the French track, as well as the alternate Falcon chessboard creature sounds from the mono mix!

 

 

Here’s a complete domestic (US) home video timeline for STAR WARS (minus the the most recent DVD re-releases from 2005 and 2006):

http://davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep4.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20070930210931/http://www.davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep4.htm

 

 

THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK:

 

The film was initially released on May 21, 1980 in 70mm.

http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/empire_strikes_back_70mm_engagements.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20170702231434/http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/empire_strikes_back_70mm_engagements.htm

 

The 70mm version features some notable difference from the version we’re all used to. Here’s a brief list of them (which originally appeared in an issue of American Cinematographer, I think):

After the probe droid lands, there is an optical wipe to the overhead shot of Luke on his Tauntaun.

After Luke wanders through the snow and falls face down, there is an optical wipe to Han instead of a straight cut.

Han says “until I can get the shelter up” instead of “until I can get the shelter built” as he stuffs Luke into the tauntaun carcass. Luke contines to moan, “Ben… Dagobah…” after he’s inside the tauntaun. The “shelter up” version (and the additional moans from Luke) was added back in for the 1997 SE and 2004 DVD.

The line “The first transport is away!” was provided by Mark Hamill. In the 70mm version (and the 1997 SE and 2004 DVD), it sounds like him. For all other versions, the dialogue was artificially deepened so as to sound different.

The first medical center scene starts on a close-up of 2-1B and then pans right to a close-up of Luke in the tank. It then cuts to FX-7 extending its arm to the tank. There is no cut to Leia, Han and Threepio observing.

When C-3PO tells Luke “It’s so good to see you fully functional again,” Luke replies “Thanks, Threepio.” This reappeared in the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

Han’s dialogue, “Transport, this is Solo. Better take off, I can’t get to you. I’ll get her out on the Falcon” is followed by, “Come on!” There is also an additional grunt from Leia as he drags her along, and her scream as the ice tunnel collapses is slightly longer. This was added back into the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

In the asteroid field, after C-3PO says “Oh, this is suicide,” he says, “There’s no where to go.” This was added back into the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

In the scene where R2-D2 is spit up by the swamp monster, Luke says “You were lucky to get out of there” instead of “You’re lucky you don’t taste very good.” This original line was added back into the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

Yoda cries out in fear when Luke points his blaster at him, and there are many more alarmed beeps from Artoo when Yoda rummages through Luke’s supplies. These were added back into the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

When the Emperor speaks with Vader, the hologram is already present in the first shot - it does not “tune in” gradually.

Yoda’s dialogue (“Yes, run! Yes. A Jedi’s strength flows from the force. But beware of the dark side. Anger, fear, aggression. The dark side of the force are they. Easily they flow, quick to join you in a fight.” is loud, clear and easy to hear. Later versions mixed down this dialogue, and added R2-D2 beeps to the scene. This early version appears in the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

The shot of the Imperial fleet before Vader speaks to the bounty hunters has additional TIE fighter sound effects. This was added back into the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

In Cloud City, after C-3PO says “That sounds like an R2 unit in there. I wonder if it…” he says “Hello?” only once instead of twice, and a different, more aggressive take of “Who are you?” is used. This was added back into the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

During the lightsaber duel, when Luke knocks Vader off the platform, Vader grunts (reused from the moment when Luke shoves the severed hose into Vader’s face) instead of a scream of “Arrrgghhh!”. This was added back into the 1997 and 2004 mixes.

When Luke falls from the weather vane onto the Millennium Falcon, the Falcon’s radar/sensor dish does not appear in the shot.

The telepathy between Luke and Vader near the end of the film uses hard cuts instead of quick dissolves.

Lando’s line at the end, “Luke, we’re ready for takeoff.” is a different take.

In the final scene, there is no tracked music from from the scene where Yoda tells Luke that “Size matters not”.

It has also been rumored that this version has the Rebel fleet jumping to hyperspace immediately before the end credits.

 

The 35mm version that saw a much wider release featured some changes. Alternate lines of dialogue were included, some sound effects disappeared, and several visual effects shots were added to the final scene to help establish the Falcon’s spatial relationship to the Rebel cruiser’s medical center. This is the version that appeared in most home video releases.
 

In 1985, as with Star Wars, the film was remixed, but no major changes have been reported.
 

In 1993, the film was remixed for the Definitive Collection laserdisc set, and is missing the high-pitched whine from the snowspeeder before it crashes (right before the Rebel power generators are blown up), a sound effect that appears in the 70mm, 1985, 1997, and 2004 mixes. The 1993 mix was reused for the 1995 VHS/laserdisc release.

 

For the 1997 Special Edition, Burtt remixed the film yet again. This was an attempt to combine the best of all prior mixes (using the highest-quality surviving sound elements), as well as adding to/enhancing the soundtrack (and adding effects and music to the newly inserted/extended scenes). Thus, dialogue that people hadn’t heard since 1980 (such as “You were lucky to get out of there!”) was added back into the film.

And, of course, the film was radically altered. New scenes and CG effects were added, existing scenes were enhanced with CG effects, most of the original opticals were recomposited with the original elements to increase the image quality/clarity (and eliminate matte lines and other artifacts), and the color timing was redone.

 

 

Here’s a great site (which hasn’t been updated in several years, unfortunately) that has side-by-side comparisons of most of the changes made for the 1997 SE:

http://home.earthlink.net/~treadwell_jay/starwars/esbindex.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20061221180451/http://home.earthlink.net/~treadwell_jay/starwars/esbindex.htm
 

For the 2004 DVD, the film was remixed into 5.1 surround sound. Some new sound effects were added here and there (for example, Luke’s lightsaber now makes the sound effect that his green-bladed JEDI saber makes when he first activates it at Cloud City). Luke’s scream from the 1997 SE (as he falls down the Cloud City reactor shaft–actually a reuse of the Emperor’s death scream from JEDI) was removed for the DVD.

Some new visual effects and changes were also added, including inserting Ian McDiarmid into the scene where Vader speaks to the Emperor. The color timing was redone by Lowry Digital to help the original trilogy visually match the prequels in terms of color saturation/constrast.
 

Here’s the official site’s breakdown of changes made for both the 1997 SE and the 2004 DVD…

http://www.starwars.com/episode-v/release/video/f20060901/index.html or http://web.archive.org/web/20070320212258/http://www.starwars.com/episode-v/release/video/f20060901/index.html
 

…and an unofficial site’s comparison:

http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-two.html or http://web.archive.org/web/20181215223317/http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-two.html

 

For the 2006 “original, unlatered” EMPIRE bonus disc, the English audio track on the bonus disc is the same as the 1993 “Definitive Collection” sound mix. However, the French and Spanish audio tracks feature a different sound mix than the 1993 Definitive Collection, a mix which appears to be based on the original 70 mm sound mix from the film’s initial theatrical release!

This alternate mix features some additional sounds that were not heard on the 35mm and subsequent home video versions, but which were later reincorporated into the 1997 and 2004 mixes. Such sounds include additional R2-D2 beeps when Yoda rummages through Luke’s supplies, and the additional TIE fighter engine sounds in the establishing shot of Darth Vader’s Star Destroyer (after Luke beheads the illusory Vader on Dagobah).
 

On the 2004 Empire DVD, the Spanish audio track is completely new (as with ANH and ROTJ), and uses the 2004 SE mix as its basis.

However, the French audio track is the same one that appears on the “bonus disc” (based on the original 70 mm mix, with the same French-speaking voice actors), but with the SE material spliced in at the appropriate spots. For example, Luke does not say, “Thanks, Threepio.” in the Hoth medical center in the French version (but he does in the new SE Spanish track).
 

Here’s a complete home video timeline for EMPIRE (minus the 2005 and 2006 DVD releases):

http://davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep5.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20071002213152/http://www.davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep5.htm

 

 

RETURN OF THE JEDI:

 

The film was released on May 25, 1983 in both 70mm and 35mm. No differences or alternate sound mixes have been reported yet.

http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/return_of_the_jedi_70mm_engagements.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20180118092539/http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/return_of_the_jedi_70mm_engagements.htm
 

The film was remixed by Ben Burtt in 1985 and 1993, but no differences have been reported.
 

For the 1997 Special Edition, Burtt remixed the film once again. This was an attempt to combine the best of all prior mixes, as well as adding to/enhancing the soundtrack (and adding effects and music to the newly inserted/extended scenes).

And, of course, the film was radically altered. New scenes and CG effects were added, existing scenes were enhanced with CG effects, most of the original opticals were recomposited with the original elements to increase the image quality/clarity (and eliminate matte lines and other artifacts), and the color timing was redone.

 

Here’s a great site (which hasn’t been updated in several years, unfortunately) that has side-by-side comparisons of most of the changes made for the 1997 SE:

http://home.earthlink.net/~treadwell_jay/starwars/rojindex.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20081003223901/http://home.earthlink.net/~treadwell_jay/starwars/rojindex.htm
 

For the 2004 DVD, the film was remixed into 5.1 surround sound. Some new sound effects were added here and there. Several new visual effects and changes were also added, including the insertion of Hayden Christensen as Anakin Skywalker’s ghost to the end of the film. The color timing was also redone by Lowry Digital to help the original trilogy visually match the prequels in terms of color saturation/constrast.

 

Here’s the official site’s breakdown of changes made for both the 1997 SE and the 2004 DVD…

http://www.starwars.com/episode-vi/release/video/f20060908/index.html or http://web.archive.org/web/20071128135859/http://www.starwars.com/episode-vi/release/video/f20060908/index.html

…and an unofficial site’s comparison:

http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-three.html or http://web.archive.org/web/20181215223709/http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-three.html
 

Finally, for the JEDI 2004 DVD, the Spanish audio track is completely new (As with STAR WARS and EMPIRE), and uses the 2004 SE mix as its basis. However, the French audio track is the same as the one on the 2006 “original, unaltered” bonus disc (presumably an original foreign dub that was dug out of the Archives for the DVD), albeit with new SE material spliced in.
 

Here’s a complete home video timeline for JEDI (minus the 2005 and 2006 DVD releases):

http://davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep6.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20071008000455/http://www.davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep6.htm

 

 

THE PHANTOM MENACE:

 

The film was released on May 19th, 1999, both on traditional film and (in the very few theaters equipped for it) digitally.
 

In the original theatrical version, Sebulba’s subtitles in his first scene read, “You won’t walk away from this one, Skywalker…you slave scum!”. For the 2001 DVD, “Skywalker” was removed, since Sebulba doesn’t actually say Anakin’s last name in the scene.

The Podrace starting grid sequence–and the race itself–were extended for the DVD.

Watto’s celebratory cry of “Sebulba!” during the Podrace was removed for the DVD.

The deleted air taxi sequence on Coruscant was inserted, but also appears in the DVD’s deleted scenes section.

In the Senate sequence, a particular alien senator’s human aides were replaced with alien characters for the DVD.
 

There were allegedly some other minor tweaks, as well.

Home video timeline for Episode I:

http://davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep1.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20071007073348/http://www.davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep1.htm

 

 

ATTACK OF THE CLONES:

 

The film was released on May 16, 2002. It was released on film, as well as digitally.

The digital theatrical version had some tinkering that distinguished it from the film version.

The most well-known difference is in the movie’s final scene, where Anakin’s mechanical hand holds Padme’s. In the theatrical film release, his mechanical hand merely hangs at his side. The version seen in the digital theatrical version is the one that appears on the DVD.

For the DVD, several other changes were made:

Several deleted lines of dialogue were added to Anakin’s confession of the Tusken Raider slaughter, and the music has been looped to accomodate the footage.

During Mace Windu and Jango Fett’s fight, additional smoke and sparks were added to Jango’s jetpack to make it clear that he could not simply rocket away and escape Windu’s killing blow.

After Padmé falls out of the Republic gunship, a Clone Trooper asks her if she is all right. Her original, energetic response of “Yes!” (which actually elicited laughter in some screenings) was changed to a more realistic and groggy “Uh-huh.” for the DVD.
 

Other minor changes for the DVD have also been rumored.

Home video timeline for Episode II:

http://davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep2.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20071006161809/http://www.davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep2.htm

 

 

REVENGE OF THE SITH:

 

The film was released on May 19th, 2005 both on film and digitally. No differences between these two versions was reported.

However, in the theatrical version, a wipe was used as a transition from Obi-Wan and C-3PO in the Naboo ship’s cockpit to Vader crawling up the lava bank. The DVD feautres a hard cut from one shot to the other. This is the only reported change for the DVD.
 

Home video timeline for Episode III:

http://davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep3.htm or http://web.archive.org/web/20071007022036/http://www.davisdvd.com/misc/starwars/ep3.htm

 

Screencaps and discussion of changes in the Prequels:

http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-four.html or http://web.archive.org/web/20170708120829/http://www.dvdactive.com/editorial/articles/star-wars-the-changes-part-four.html

 

…WHEW!!!

Papa George just loves his tinkerin’, don’t he?

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Wow! Great info to have compiled.

FE<3OT

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Oh yeah, I forgot about Treadwell's old site. There's a flashback.

This ought to be moved to Theatrical Cuts vs. Special Editions.
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So perhaps these mixes can assist in the reconstruction of a 2.0 version of the 1.0 mix...

"Right now the coffees are doing their final work." (Airi, Masked Rider Den-o episode 1)

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 (Edited)

Many of the websites that Gregatron linked to in his insightful and informative post unfortunately are no longer around.

In an attempt to not lose that information - and also the sterling efforts of Gregatron - the links in his OP have been updated to include working links from the Internet Archive’s WayBack machine.
 

^ There may be some familiar old sites linked to… 😉
 

Well in Gregatron 👍

 

 

Links have also been fixed/updated and added & compiled in the similarly older thread of ‘The changes made to the Original Trilogy films down the years…’ - with various sources of information available during that time.

Along with several (15-20) similar older and somewhat outdated OT•com ‘comparison & info’ type threads - though still worthy of archiving; with some gentle yet thorough reminiscing - added to the An Index Thread for Theatrical Cuts vs. Subsequent Releases

 

The current and up-to-date Complete Comparison of Special Edition Visual Changes discussion thread - by doubleofive - features an array of links to various sources covering the many changes made to the Original Trilogy films - as well his own superb comprehensive projects on the changes made to the three classic films. It also serves as the main discussion thread on these many changes…
 

originaltrilogy.com Moderator

I find that answer vague and unconvincing. Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves?
Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? And say something righteous and hopeful for a change?

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I am learing so much from reading through all these links! Thank you so much. It will take me a long time but I am enjoying doing so - from these links from some years ago (a welcome reminder to some of the design layouts and styles on the internet back then too!) to the latest changes in doubleofive’s tremendous thread with more links and content.

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In ESB when Han says “Then I’ll see you in hell.” that line used to be “Then I’ll see you in HELLLLL!!!” with the “hell” part really screamed and loud, later on they seemed to mute that down a lot.

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MonkeyLizard10 said:

In ESB when Han says “Then I’ll see you in hell.” that line used to be “Then I’ll see you in HELLLLL!!!” with the “hell” part really screamed and loud, later on they seemed to mute that down a lot.

Is this true, a fact?

R4

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^ I enjoyed watching that, it was quite well edited and explained some of the changes made before we even get to the Special Editions. Thankyou 😃

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Yes I agree! Excellent video. I look forward to the other parts! I haven’t known about all of the audio changes. Quite fascinating!

Would this series of video be a primer for George Lucas: unreliable narrator & time travelling revisionist: the movie? 😉

MyYouTubeChannel

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 (Edited)

mykyta-R4 said:

MonkeyLizard10 said:

In ESB when Han says “Then I’ll see you in hell.” that line used to be “Then I’ll see you in HELLLLL!!!” with the “hell” part really screamed and loud, later on they seemed to mute that down a lot.

Is this true, a fact?

Well at the least it is true that I heard it in theater way back with the “hell” sounding a lot louder. I suppose there is always some chance it could just be that some theaters had speakers that had some sort of spikes that matched his voice and the way he said that and it made it sound more boosted, although that seems far less likely and reasonable of an explanation than that they just dampened it down a bit to not stress a semi-swear word as much or something.