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bad_karma24

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Join date
28-Mar-2004
Last activity
16-Jun-2019
Posts
683

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Post
#41530
Topic
Star Wars Pan Scan
Time
Quote

Originally posted by: GundarkHunter
Quote

Originally posted by: Warbler
How is Doctor Strangelove multi-aspect-ratio?


It isn't, really. Kubrick did apply a variety of mattes during shooting, but it's still 1.37:1 (Academy ratio).


No, it's not. Maybe I'm not understanding you, but it changes aspect ratios for sure. It may not be as noticeable on TVs due to overscanning, but it was done to impose a sense of confusion and paranioa in the audience, much like the wine glass in A Clockwork Orange.
Post
#40868
Topic
Star Wars Pan Scan
Time
Quote

Originally posted by: Warbler
Quote

Originally posted by: jimbo
Quote

Originally posted by: Warbler
Quote



Yes but correct me if I'm wrong althought you're seeing everything the director shot, not everthing that the director shot is somthing that he/she wants you to see. Which is why even in this case the Widescreen print is stlll the correct version. I think anyway.


I disagree. Many widescreen fans say this but I think that whichever version shows more of the shot picture. For example in Terminator 3 only the fullscreen version has any nudity. Kristanna Loken breast are not shown in widescreen. Why on earth would the directer not want you to see this. Hell even some effects shots look better in fullscreen. In the making of it showed how they animated the water below the Hunter Killer and talked for 5 minutes on how they did this. When it shows the final shot in 2.35 widescreen the water below the hunter killer is not visible. Yes there are definutly movies where the fullscreen version is superior but not alot of them. Still this is about Star Wars that movie is clearly much better in widescreen.


The point when T3 was in the theater it was shown widescreen. If the director perfers the fullscreen version, why is the widescreen version the one being shown in the theaters?


Because modern theaters aren't equipped to show 4:3 films.
Post
#40730
Topic
Star Wars Pan Scan
Time
Quote

Originally posted by: jimbo
Get this on Terminator 3 not only does fullscreen show more on the top and bottoms get this. A couple shots fullscreen shows more on the sides. Warning there is some nudity for the scemise and the gay. Heres proof. During the effects shots they were framed in 1.85 so the widescreen shows more on the sides but the fullscreen version shows a bit more on the top. So effects shots were done in Super 35 and the rest was soft matte.


I really don't get what you're saying. T3 was shown theatrically at 2.35:1. It's filming process was Super 35, for everything, not just the effects shots. If it was soft matted, it would have been 1.85:1.

And stop going on about the nudity. You really are 16... (I'm 17, but whatever )
Post
#40641
Topic
Star Wars Pan Scan
Time
The Terminator films (just 2 and 3, not the first) were shot in what is called Super 35, and agreed, it is a rather odd process. The director shoots in a large frame, and cuts things off for both pan and scan, and widescreen. Other movies shot this way include the LOTR trilogy and The Rock.

In any case, widescreen is not always the perferable version. It's whatever the director prefers. For example, Kubrick did not shoot many of his later films in widescreen, he shot them in full frame (TV aspect ratio). In the theaters, the tops and bottom were matted off. Widescreening began in the 1950's, so don't look for widescreen versions of Gone With the Wind, Casablanca, etc. And just because it was shot open matte (TV aspect ratio) doesn't mean the full screen version is better than widescreen. Back to the Future is one example. Another one is the famous nude scene in A Fish Called Wanda. In the widescreen version, Cleese is naked, in the fullscreen version, he has shorts on.