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LeperMessiah117

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14-Jan-2020
Last activity
12-Sep-2021
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Post
#1448144
Topic
Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic - Remake
Time

Pissed oooooooooofff!!! (Xbox-boy here)

Seriously though, this reveal confirmation makes me excited. The idea of canonizing Revan’s story is extremely appealing to me. KotOR is not only probably one of the easiest of the Legends canon to fold back into the Disney canon (as it’s so far removed from the timeline of the vast majority of content released by them so far), it’s also one of the best and most revered of all Star Wars stories in the franchise, revered by me especially. This remake is a no-brainer. And I’m very interested to see how they handle it all (story, characters, gameplay and RPG elements) with a modern sensibility.

Just slightly annoyed I gotta wait longer to experience it. But, if the PC version get released first (alongside PS5) I may just go with that.

I hate Sony.

Post
#1446502
Topic
The Criterion Collection Thread
Time

Stardust1138 said:

LeperMessiah117 said:

Alright, then! And here’s my thoughts on Stalker!

I can describe Stalker in a few terms; labyrinthian, enigmatic, despairing. These terms apply not only to The Zone within the film, but the film itself.

Even though a good hour and a half of this film is set in essentially one location (the building in which houses The Room and the surrounding area just outside), the film makes a dream-like and confused journey of it, with characters disappearing from frame on one side and reappearing again on the other as the camera pans over, or characters getting left behind only show up again as the others press on ahead. The masterful camerawork shows us so much, each shot perfectly framed, and yet, we are never convinced that we are being guided through anything less than a open spaced maze. The viewer is never sure where they are going, where they are or where they have been and through it all, likely left feeling as lost as the Writer and Professor must have felt as they follow the Stalker’s lead though the enigma they know as The Zone.

The Zone is utterly confounding. One is never at any point sure what is possible in this place or of what it’s capable. We know that many have disappeared here or otherwise met their demises, but we never see by what means their fates have been met. Tanks and various vehicles lie desolate, a pair a skeletons lay forgotten in a final, eternal embrace. We are told The Porcupine’s brother was killed during a venture to The Room, but otherwise we have little to go on as to what happens to those who evoke The Zone’s punishment. And what is it that’s behind The Zone? Aliens? God? Something unfathomable perhaps. Is it even something with consciousness? Perhaps it’s an unimportant question, really. What we know is that The Zone and the consequences for “disrespecting” it are real.

And The Room with it’s promise of granting one’s innermost, secret desire is real, as evidence by the unseen Porcupine character, who committed suicide one week after returning The Room. The Room is a deeply troubling concept, and it’s function seems to be, rather than the bland “your wish has been granted” type miracle that some a who have ventured to that place presumed it would be, but rather a journey to meet oneself, one’s true inner self, which can be soul-crushing and traumatizing, as your secret, unconscious desire is laid bare to be reckoned with. Porcupine, in his conscience mind, thought to bring his brother back from the dead, only to be rewarded with a big pile of money once he returned home. Most of us consider ourselves good, well-intentioned people, but how many of us would also find a pile of cash once we got home? Even if consciously we set out to fulfill a desire of noble intent? The Room, in a way, is a mirror for looking into one’s own ‘soul’, which I think would break many of us. And in the end, the Stalker’s clients wisely chose not to enter. I think that only those who have pure hearts, either pure goodness or evil, could theoretically use The Room with satisfaction. But it begs the question if anybody like that actually exists. The Professor sets out with the intention of destroying The Room, lest it fall into the hands of an evil sort, but who knows if somebody as such could even make it that far into The Zone? Either way, The Room is not what you’d imagine it would be at first based on a simple one sentence description of it.

A few more things about movie; This is a near perfect film, I’d say. Given the time and place (and production setbacks as well), one can easily forgive the very few technical imperfections and Stalker is about as perfect as one could possibly hope for it to be. As I said, the camerawork is masterful. Every shot in the film can be used as a desktop background. I love the use of sepia-tone in this film. It somehow feels more colourless than black & white. To me, I interpret the colour change shifts to reflect The Stalker character’s hope, as all parts of the film that are in full colour are in The Zone or focused on his daughter (I love that colour shot that starts off appearing as if his daughter is walking on her own, implying the wishes he holds for her future.)

The best films have the least amount of editing and the editing very restrained (I doubt Tarkovsky shot much coverage at all). Because shots last so long (and not without purpose) there are many, many, many shots that will stick with you long after you’ve seen it. The sound design is on point. The acting is wonderfully restrained at most times, but when the actors are required to give strong emotional performances, they deliver splendidly. The music, also restrained, provides so much whenever it is used, adding to the strange atmosphere. Perhaps what I enjoy the most is the film’s atmosphere. The desolate, quiet and lonely nature of the world, as we see it, really speaks to me and reminds me alot of Eraserhead in a sense. It sounds weird, but I kinda want to visit the areas as portrayed in this film.

I would probably give the film a 9/10 overall. Very close to a 10 out of 10. I will, likely, never fully understand this film, and I’m fine with that. Stalker will be a film I’ll keep returning to and maybe I can grasp a little more of it’s truth (and perhaps my own) with each subsequent viewing.

TD;DR - Stalker is a masterpiece.

Apologies for not getting back to you sooner. I’m really glad you had such impactful viewings of Stalker. I’m not sure what else to add at the moment but I really enjoyed reading your thoughts. I think I need to revisit The Zone as I truly wonder how my prospective will change with another viewing. I just know from my first viewing it’s left me scarred after all these years and I can see the difference between my perception of life before and after that fateful experience.

Now, I need to start considering the next Tarkovsky film for a viewing. Not sure where to go next after Stalker and Solaris.

Post
#1442105
Topic
The Criterion Collection Thread
Time

Alright, then! And here’s my thoughts on Stalker!

I can describe Stalker in a few terms; labyrinthian, enigmatic, despairing. These terms apply not only to The Zone within the film, but the film itself.

Even though a good hour and a half of this film is set in essentially one location (the building in which houses The Room and the surrounding area just outside), the film makes a dream-like and confused journey of it, with characters disappearing from frame on one side and reappearing again on the other as the camera pans over, or characters getting left behind only show up again as the others press on ahead. The masterful camerawork shows us so much, each shot perfectly framed, and yet, we are never convinced that we are being guided through anything less than a open spaced maze. The viewer is never sure where they are going, where they are or where they have been and through it all, likely left feeling as lost as the Writer and Professor must have felt as they follow the Stalker’s lead though the enigma they know as The Zone.

The Zone is utterly confounding. One is never at any point sure what is possible in this place or of what it’s capable. We know that many have disappeared here or otherwise met their demises, but we never see by what means their fates have been met. Tanks and various vehicles lie desolate, a pair a skeletons lay forgotten in a final, eternal embrace. We are told The Porcupine’s brother was killed during a venture to The Room, but otherwise we have little to go on as to what happens to those who evoke The Zone’s punishment. And what is it that’s behind The Zone? Aliens? God? Something unfathomable perhaps. Is it even something with consciousness? Perhaps it’s an unimportant question, really. What we know is that The Zone and the consequences for “disrespecting” it are real.

And The Room with it’s promise of granting one’s innermost, secret desire is real, as evidence by the unseen Porcupine character, who committed suicide one week after returning The Room. The Room is a deeply troubling concept, and it’s function seems to be, rather than the bland “your wish has been granted” type miracle that some a who have ventured to that place presumed it would be, but rather a journey to meet oneself, one’s true inner self, which can be soul-crushing and traumatizing, as your secret, unconscious desire is laid bare to be reckoned with. Porcupine, in his conscience mind, thought to bring his brother back from the dead, only to be rewarded with a big pile of money once he returned home. Most of us consider ourselves good, well-intentioned people, but how many of us would also find a pile of cash once we got home? Even if consciously we set out to fulfill a desire of noble intent? The Room, in a way, is a mirror for looking into one’s own ‘soul’, which I think would break many of us. And in the end, the Stalker’s clients wisely chose not to enter. I think that only those who have pure hearts, either pure goodness or evil, could theoretically use The Room with satisfaction. But it begs the question if anybody like that actually exists. The Professor sets out with the intention of destroying The Room, lest it fall into the hands of an evil sort, but who knows if somebody as such could even make it that far into The Zone? Either way, The Room is not what you’d imagine it would be at first based on a simple one sentence description of it.

A few more things about movie; This is a near perfect film, I’d say. Given the time and place (and production setbacks as well), one can easily forgive the very few technical imperfections and Stalker is about as perfect as one could possibly hope for it to be. As I said, the camerawork is masterful. Every shot in the film can be used as a desktop background. I love the use of sepia-tone in this film. It somehow feels more colourless than black & white. To me, I interpret the colour change shifts to reflect The Stalker character’s hope, as all parts of the film that are in full colour are in The Zone or focused on his daughter (I love that colour shot that starts off appearing as if his daughter is walking on her own, implying the wishes he holds for her future.)

The best films have the least amount of editing and the editing very restrained (I doubt Tarkovsky shot much coverage at all). Because shots last so long (and not without purpose) there are many, many, many shots that will stick with you long after you’ve seen it. The sound design is on point. The acting is wonderfully restrained at most times, but when the actors are required to give strong emotional performances, they deliver splendidly. The music, also restrained, provides so much whenever it is used, adding to the strange atmosphere. Perhaps what I enjoy the most is the film’s atmosphere. The desolate, quiet and lonely nature of the world, as we see it, really speaks to me and reminds me alot of Eraserhead in a sense. It sounds weird, but I kinda want to visit the areas as portrayed in this film.

I would probably give the film a 9/10 overall. Very close to a 10 out of 10. I will, likely, never fully understand this film, and I’m fine with that. Stalker will be a film I’ll keep returning to and maybe I can grasp a little more of it’s truth (and perhaps my own) with each subsequent viewing.

TD;DR - Stalker is a masterpiece.

Post
#1440681
Topic
The Criterion Collection Thread
Time

Added before the end of the sale:

Stalker
Memories of Murder
Carnival of Souls

Stardust1138 said:

Added:

The Complete Films of Agnès Varda

My last sale item. I’m really looking forward to exploring her art. It looks so playfully fun yet with lots of deeper meanings.

The Irishman should be good. I really need to get into Martin Scorsese’s films. The Age of Innocence is on my wish list for future sales.

Martin Scorsese is a director of whose filmography I need to do a deeper dive. I have seen Goodfellas, Casino, The Departed, Shutter Island and The Irishman. He’s mostly known for his Italian mobster films and Goodfellas and Casino are awesome, but he seems much more diverse than that and I definitely need to explore his other works.

Post
#1426773
Topic
Rank The Indiana Jones Films
Time

Bluto said:

I’ve only seen Skull once (at the cinema) and my rather vague recollection is “meh”.

It’s worse than you remember. Saw it for the first time in a decade about a month ago (a fanedit) and hoped I would get something out of it in spite of it’s flaws. I, too, would have given it a 6 based on memory, but I honestly think it doesn’t deserve higher than a 3.

Post
#1421116
Topic
Any Tv/Film reboots, remakes or sequels that you felt were superior to the original?
Time

The Empire Strikes Back
The Last Jedi
Evil Dead 2
Twin Peaks: The Return
John Wick Chapter 2
The Raid 2: Berandal

In terms of remakes for which I have seen both the original and remake, the only thing I can come up with is Suspiria. I would say The Thing, but I haven’t seen The Thing From Another World.

Thepostersandnothingbut said:

Just curious what titles people will come up with.

For example, though at first it pissed me off to even hear it was being made, I ended up enjoying NBC’s Hannibal more than the movies and the books.

I would like to continue watching this one day. I’m just always discouraged when I know it ended before it’s time, but then if I hadn’t started watching Twin Peaks, even though I knew it had no solid ending, I wouldn’t have found one of my favorite shows.

Post
#1417512
Topic
Evil Dead: The Complete Story Cut V1 (Evil Dead Trilogy 4k Source Edit) EXAMPLES IN POST (Released)
Time

OGSpark said:

LeperMessiah117 said:

I see I’m not the only one who put Journey to the Center of the Mind at the end of Army of Darkness.

Ummm… I’m open to checking out your edit, but I’ll wait until V2 because I am opposed to viewing AoD international cut again. I HATE what they did to the Tiny Ashes scene. Butcher’s work if there ever was.

I’m totally with you on the issues with the International cut. There are so many scenes with jarring cuts in this version, that I was wanting to use theatrical instead, but it won’t matter much when the UHD is released.

I’ll come back here once that 4K version is released, as I am watching out for the 4K Scream Factory blu-ray. I am quite interested in an edit of this kind, as I made one myself… over 15 years ago using a VCR and DVD copies of the movies. My first fanedit, actually! Probably still have that tape lying around somewhere.

Post
#1417426
Topic
Evil Dead: The Complete Story Cut V1 (Evil Dead Trilogy 4k Source Edit) EXAMPLES IN POST (Released)
Time

I see I’m not the only one who put Journey to the Center of the Mind at the end of Army of Darkness.

Ummm… I’m open to checking out your edit, but I’ll wait until V2 because I am opposed to viewing AoD international cut again. I HATE what they did to the Tiny Ashes scene. Butcher’s work if there ever was.

Post
#1413162
Topic
Your favo[u]rite directors
Time

At the moment I have a top 4 favorite directors. There are many directors that I like, such as Paul Thomas Anderson and Andrei Tarkovski for example, who have made films that I would consider 10/10 quality, but have either released other films I’m not so crazy about and/or haven’t seen enough from them to give them a place on my list of favorite directors (YET!) Only time will tell how my list will expand. The list is short, for now it would be (in particular no order):

Stanley Kubrick
David Lynch
Quentin Tarantino
Park Chan-Wook

Other directors that I really admire who may wind up on the list someday, but wouldn’t put on the list just yet:

Andrei Tarkovsky (after only seeing two films, mind you)
Paul Thomas Anderson
Sam Raimi
Terry Gilliam
John Carpenter
Bong Joon-ho
Joel & Ethan Coen
Martin Scorsese
Sergio Leone
Mike Flanagan
Robert Eggers
Vince Gilligan
Rian Johnson

Post
#1412431
Topic
Captain Marvel, hoping to make carol a bit more likeable for those who hate her. (COMPLETED)
Time

I don’t even dislike Captain Marvel, per se. I may sound like a chud, but there isn’t an MCU film that I actively dislike, yet. I think the worst of them are watchable, at least in the context of the rest of the series. But I understand and agree with your assessment. Captain Marvel really hamfisted the “girl-power” thing in to the point where Carol Danvers was pretty annoying at several points in the film.

Post
#1412429
Topic
Unpopular Opinion Thread
Time

WookieeWarrior77 said:

LeperMessiah117 said:

Return of the Jedi is not the worst film of the original trilogy.
What is in your opinion?

The otherwise obvious choice, A New Hope. But only barely. I love 'em all, but I think A New Hope is the weak link. I do understand most people’s criticisms of Return of the Jedi, but the perceived flaws of the film are things that do not bother me at all, or at least not anymore. Ewoks, for example, are one aspect I’ve come around on.

A New Hope introduces many of defining characteristics of the franchise, i.e. a rebellion fighting a war against a tyrannical empire, space-wizard samurai, cocky smugglers with questionable morals yet hidden hearts of gold, ruthless bounty hunters and a seedy criminal underworld, space battles against impossibly constructed space stations of mass destruction, crawling around on or in areas of space stations not meant for crawling around in order to evade hostile forces, etc. Most of these aspects are expanded upon and fleshed out in the next two films to dramatic and/or universe-build effect. Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi is where Star Wars fully captured it’s tone and identity and they will always be the 1st 2 things that pop into my mind wherever Star Wars is mentioned. Granted, The tone of RotJ is less consistent than the others, but it still has many classic scenes (many of my favorite scenes series-wide) that have defined Star Wars and influenced many stories going forward, both inside and outside the franchise, to good and bad effect.

Again, it doesn’t really matter that 4 is my least favorite, as I love 'em all. Between 4 and 5, my least and most favorites of the trilogy, there’s really only a 1 point difference on the 10 out 10 scale. I just think 5 and 6 is when Star Wars truly became Star Wars whereas 4 was the blueprint provider.

Post
#1412388
Topic
Info: The random and general <strong>Fan Edit Ideas</strong> thread....
Time

I recently completed work on a new personal edit of Army of Darkness that I have come to call the “Jack and Shit Edition”. Since I have no intentions at this moment to share the edit online, I thought I’d just mention it here rather than make a whole thread about it.

The idea isn’t too dissimilar to previous edits, to make a long cut that combines the ‘best’ elements of multiple cuts into one. Additionally, my intention was to create an edit that is almost 100% faithful to the film (so I have removed very little footage, overall) and to have a longer cut that is Ash Vs Evil Dead friendly in terms of the film’s multiple endings. I used the Director’s cut from the Scream Factory release as a base and edited in segments of the Theatrical cut from the same set where desired. Changelist is as follows:

  • The colour of the Director’s cut has been slightly dulled across the board for the DC footage to better match the TC. The change has helped to blend the 2 versions more seemlessly, but I am not an expert on colour alteration. While it has helped considerably, I have also had to tweak the colours more extensively on a scene-by-scene basis to match up the footage to the best of my limited abilities.

  • The Dino De Laurentiis Communications production card has been reinserted whereas it has been removing, seemingly, from most versions of the film starting with the DVD era going forward. This was added for my own nostalgia of watching the film on VHS as a kid.

  • An extended version of the soundtrack was used for the opening of the film, using the Prologue track from the OST. The score now plays over the Universal and Dino De Laurentiis Communications production cards and have also been sped up to sync with the score mixed into the film’s audio track. This, I feel, lends to an even more epic feeling right from when the film starts up.

  • The TC version of the She-Bitch fight is retained, purely for the reason that the DC lacks the score present in the TC.

  • The TC version of “Gimme some sugar, baby” has been retained, so no hanky-panky sex scene or Sheila wrapping a blanket around Ash’s shoulders. This is done partially for pacing, but also because I don’t like showing Ash having a ‘good time’ more than is absolutely necessary. Plus, it’s been inferred through dialogue that they bone, we get it. We don’t really need to see it.

  • As other edits have done, the DC version of the Little Ashes scene has been restored with the score with the OST. I had to trim a bit here and there to make the footage and score sync up just right, but no more than 2 seconds of the scene is missing.

  • “Good, bad, I’m the guy with the gun” is retained over “I ain’t that good”.

  • The TC of the Graveyard skeletal “3 Stooges” shenanigans is retained over the DC version. Partially for pacing, but also because why would Ash bother taking time to tear off that skeleton’s arm? Just get the hell out of there!

  • “Yeah, and I’m a Chinese jet pilot…” is retained over “I need more men”.

  • The scene of Arthur’s men preparing to fire explosive arrows at the army of darkness has been trimmed for pacing. Only about 7 seconds of the bowmen holding their arrows have been removed, but the pacing is slightly improved for it.

  • The TC’s ending is retained for continuity with Ash Vs Evil Dead. I have always preferred the original post-apocalyptic ending over the S-Mart ending. I believe that the original is a more suitable ending for the trilogy, but now that AVED has a similar sort ending, I don’t mind putting AoD’s “I slept too long!” ending aside.

  • The Amboy Dukes track “Journey to the Center of the Mind” is used for the ending credits.

  • A modern “Renaissance Pictures” production card is attached post-credits.

This is not a complete overhaul of the film, mostly just scene or music swapping with tinkering to the colouring and the pace of some scenes, so it wasn’t a grueling project by any means. I’m still happy with it, the best editing project I have ever completed. It’s certainly good enough to be the first fanedit project of mine to talk about online, anyway. Just showed my dad the edit and he couldn’t detect any obvious editing seams, so I’m definitely happy about that.

Post
#1410760
Topic
The Criterion Collection Thread
Time

Stardust1138 said:

You’ll have to let me know what he says, in particular about Stalker.

https://youtu.be/HsN34cmEBsg

Here’s the preview of his talk from their YouTube channel.

His family were big movie buffs and his grandfather would tale them to foreign films often. Rian grew up loving Star Wars (of course), Raiders of the Lost Ark, E.T., The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Scorsese films and such. He started out shooting parody films on Super-8 format in junior high and his interest in filmmaking progressed until he got to the point of considering directing film a serious career applied to various film school once he was old enough, but he was rejected repeatedly. Though, he managed to get in to USC during the midterm with his last application which was written as an “obnoxious screw you” diss but ended up getting accept because of it, lol.

About Stalker, he says that he had only seen the film within the past year (of the interview) and he’d seen The Sacrifice, Ivan’s Childhood and Solaris beforehand which prepared him for Stalker. He calls the film mesmerizing, says that people should go into the film thinking of it as a mountain to be climbed and that although the film uses “boredom” as a tool in it’s storytelling that it is ultimately rewarding. He also said that he would not want to go into the Room lest he actually discovers his true heart’s desires. Which yeah, can’t blame him.

And yes, I finally got around to watching Stalker myself. I feel less inclined to speak on how I feel about Stalker than even Solaris, but if I could say anything, wowwie! I indeed love the film. It’s obvious from this film and Solaris the Tarkovsky will let his films take as much time as he needs to build their atmosphere and tone and it works incredibly well. If Stalker were a Hollywood production it’d be cut an hour shorter at minimum and the film would utterly suffer for it, the effect he was going for totally demolished. This will be another blu-ray I’ll be picking up whenever the next Criterion sale occurs, for sure.

Post
#1408666
Topic
The Criterion Collection Thread
Time

Stardust1138 said:

Adding The Tree of Life by Terrence Malick and The Red Shoes by Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger!

I am glad to see you watched and had such an experience with Solaris, LeparMessiah117. I’ll be curious to see how it goes on your second viewing.

I don’t have a subscription to the Criterion Channel but I know there’s some great films on offer. Recently they added Bertrand Tavernier who I’d really like to get into as their trailer looked very intriguing and lovely. I’m not sure I recall your opinion on The Last Jedi but there’s also an interview on there where Rian Johnson talks about his favourite films in the Collection with Alicia Malone.

Yes, Solaris is one of those films I refuse to give my full thoughts on until the 2nd viewing. Now some time later, even though so much of the film sticks out vividly in my mind, it deserves secondary analysis in order to form a fully realized assessment of my feelings on the film. But I’m saving that for blu-ray so I have bonus materials. I’m very much looking forward to Stalker now that I have the channel.

And yes, I rather like The Last Jedi and the films of Rian Johnson. Is that interview a part of the same series where filmmakers talk about Criterion films and going through a closet of Criterion blu-rays? I saw one of those with Terry Gilliam a while back. I know Criterion puts out alot of filmmaker interview footage on Youtube and such, so maybe/maybe not.

Post
#1407846
Topic
The Hobbit (M4 Book Edit) (Released)
Time

To be honest, comparing the 3 different versions I’d say the Arkenstone edit probably works the best. I’d guess it’s probably the shot of Bilbo grabbing the ledge that makes it seem a little less obvious of an edit than the other two.

Still, I also have no problem with the way the scene plays out in the current version either, although I guess Bilbo coming closer to plummeting off the ledge provides more excitement and we do get more interaction between Bilbo and Thorin, which isn’t a bad thing.

Post
#1405471
Topic
The Criterion Collection Thread
Time

I finally got a subscription to the Criterion Channel (an annual membership) and needless to say, the library of films featured with the service is staggering. I hardly know where to begin! The films I’ve viewed so far in the few days that I’ve had it are:

Lolita - directed by Stanley Kubrick
Once Upon a Time In the West - directed by Sergio Leone
The Quiet Family - directed by Kim Jee-woon
Vernon, Florida - directed by Errol Morris
The Picture of Dorian Gray - directed by Albert Lewin

May be a longshot (and I intend to search the internet for other possible sources) but if anybody here also happens to have the service, I’d appreciate recommendations for more films.

My current plan is to first view films that I already had heard of and had previous interest in seeing and also to go though the featured films that are also a part of the Criterion Collection’s current catalogue of blu-ray releases so I may decide if I like any films enough that I’d want the full experience that comes with owning the film’s Criterion blu-ray release.

And I’d definitely recommend checking the channel out to any film buff for sure (not a shill, lol), it seems as though there’s plenty of variety to accommodate anybody’s taste in movies.