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TestingOutTheTest

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Post
#1425208
Topic
Star Wars: <strong>The Rise Of Skywalker</strong> Redux Ideas thread
Time

Speaking of Rey’s parents, a while back I proposed the idea of removing the idea of Rey’s parents being good people who loved her and wanted to protect her - the retcon that her parents actually loved her undermines her arc in TLJ of moving on and learning to stop caring about her parents who threw their own daughter away like garbage, because in TRoS it turns out Rey stopped caring about her parents in TLJ all for nothing.

The idea consisted of removing hints, scenes and lines about Rey’s parents being good people who loved her, and at one point I came up with the idea of having it so her parents abandoned her because she is a Palpatine (combined with her Force-sensitivity).

REY: You said you knew the rest of my story. You knew why my parents threw me away. Why? Tell me.

KYLO REN: Because they were afraid of what you would become. You don’t just have power, you have his power. You’re his granddaughter. You are a Palpatine.

Post
#1425206
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker Expanded Edition by Rae Carson: The &quot;Tragedy of Vader&quot; Edit (WIP)
Time

I have a suggestion, do not retain the idea of Mr. Rey (not a Finding Nemo reference) being a clone of Palpatine. Rey being the actual granddaughter of Palpatine - a familial, hereditary connection between the two - solidifies her belief that her being his blood, direct granddaughter is the reason she is continually giving into the dark side, that no one is going to give her any validation because of her heritage, you get the idea; not to mention in the actual film it streamlines Palps’ motivations…

Palpatine is suffering in a clone body and hopes to possess a Force-sensitive, so he decides to conceive a child, acknowledging that biological children are not clones in the way his failing body is, hoping for that child to turn out to be Force-sensitive; his son, however, turns out to be a non-Force-sensitive — the mere fact alone he does not teach him in the ways of the dark side implies he is not Force-sensitive, and if he were Force-sensitive then the events of the sequel trilogy would not have turned out the way it did.

The man goes on to conceive Rey with a woman, Palpatine goes after her, the man and woman abandon Rey and the both of them are killed by Ochi, and Palpatine goes after Ben Solo instead, yadda yadda.

Post
#1425017
Topic
Star Wars: <strong>The Rise Of Skywalker</strong> Redux Ideas thread
Time

CamSMurph said:

How would I re-edit TRoS? Well, for starters, I’d throw out the concept of force healing since it pretty much came out of nowhere. Then, I’d have Palpatine kill Kylo by throwing him into the pit. Lastly, I’d have Rey proclaim, “Just Rey,” at the end of the film, and her arc would come full circle.

Firstly, Rey has the Jedi texts, so of course she’d get something from that.

Secondly, killing off Ben at that point misses the point; having Ben heal Rey makes sense from a thematic perspective, he’s fulfilling what Vader started.

Lastly, “just Rey” also misses the point; “Rey Skywalker” is there to show how the Skywalkers’ legacy will live on after the actual bloodline becomes extinct, which is the point of the entire trilogy.

Post
#1424661
Topic
I am writing a long defense of the entire Skywalker saga, and in the post is a draft of the opening section.
Time

jedi_bendu said:

TestingOutTheTest said:

Irrelevant, but have you read my Rey Palpatine defense yet?

Now that you’ve asked, I just have. I agree that it doesn’t necessarily contradict the decision in TLJ, but I agree with the other responses that Rey’s arc around accepting that her heritage doesn’t define was mostly completed in TLJ - she just needed a film where she finally gains confidence in taking on the Skywalker mantle (which she does in TROS) and not a whole new plot development. I mostly dislike the Rey Palpatine decision because I love when Star Wars has an everyman/woman theme around standing up for what’s right, and Rey Palpatine means Rey doesn’t have her own power but “his power”, as well as reinforcing the feeling of the main star wars characters being interconnected within this small, elite group.

But as I say, I agree that it doesn’t contradict the theme about Rey learning that heritage doesn’t define her.

Hmm…

I never got that impression about the “heritage in general” thing in TLJ, Rey just simply stopped caring about her parents - the ones who birthed and conceived her. She needed to stop caring about them and move on, because they thought she was completely worthless. Also, just because Rey’s PARENTS were… every people, doesn’t mean her GRANDPARENTS or other ancestors were.

Post
#1424333
Topic
I am writing a long defense of the entire Skywalker saga, and in the post is a draft of the opening section.
Time

Yes, I am going to be putting out a long defense of The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones, Revenge of the Sith, The Force Awakens, The Last Jedi and The Rise of Skywalker, in the form of a single essay similar to that one rebuttal to Plinkett’s review of The Phantom Menace — it is designed to refute almost every single criticism I have seen be used towards these movies, I am also hoping to explain it in much detail in a way for people to understand as to where I, alongside fellow prequel and sequel fans, are coming from (yes, I enjoy and defend both trilogies). I am still in the process of writing it, I am more focusing on the sequel trilogy at the moment.

Below is a draft of the opening section…

The Skywalker saga. The trilogy of trilogies. One of the most popular film franchises of all time, alongside the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Peter Jackson’s Middle-earth saga, the Harry Potter film octology, and many more. And sadly, one of, if not the most misunderstood of them all…

For so long, many seemed to have misunderstood the Skywalker saga — I am sorry if it comes across as… uh, harassment towards that particular group of people, but usually as a result of not paying much attention to the films — , to the point where misconceptions regarding the movies had been spreading for the past few decades and those who had internalized these turned against much of its installments, more specifically the prequel and sequel trilogies, respectively, because of these.

It has been getting me on my nerves for quite some time now, and in response… well, here is a long response to this, addressing each and almost every common criticism I have seen for the prequel and sequel trilogies, respectively, and put these to rest, for better or worse.

One might call out many of these explanations as “headcanon,” “mental gymnastics” or things that “are not supported by the films at all,” even though neither of these are the case — instead, they rely on inference.

For those unaware of what “inference” is, look at this scene from Infinity War. Here, Thanos is communicating with a younger Gamora after activating the Infinity Stones with that snap of his fingers. Given that Thanos had sacrificed Gamora for the Soul Stone earlier in the film, and that the location the both of them are residing in at that point is of the color orange, the same color of the Soul Stone, one can infer that Thanos is literally inside of the Soul Stone.

On the topic of inference, I am going to be bringing up pieces of evidence (from which information is inferable) in a large amount of my responses to specific criticisms, as a way of preventing others from accusing me of reaching or creating “headcanon that is not in the movies” or using “mental gymnastics”.

There are no uses of “maybe” or “perhaps” anywhere throughout the essay, to avoid the risk of people acting as if I was saying something that is plausible but did not actually happen, regardless of whether it is surface-level information or an inference — for example, any time I respond to a supposed plot hole such as, “Why did X do this or that?”, I am not going to say, “Perhaps/maybe X was, say, motivated by this or that!”

Regarding the sequel trilogy, the responses to criticisms for each film relies on information from its prior installments and itself, it does not use information from its follow-ups, I am trying to frame it as if the film was recently released which was when the criticism would have to first… pop up; for example, when I am discussing The Last Jedi in this essay I am only going to be using information from itself as well as its prior installments, I am not going to be using information from its follow-up, The Rise of Skywalker.

As for the prequel trilogy, well… the films are supposed to be the prequels to the original trilogy; any responses to criticisms directed at supposed plot holes and continuity errors use information from the prequel and original trilogies.

I just want to mention that I am not trying to convince any of you that any of these movies are “good,” I am just trying to say that all of the things I am going to be addressing throughout this essay all make sense within the context of the movies and are capable of being justified by applying logic and closely analyzing the films, inferring information from dialogue, visuals, acting, character backgrounds and already-established facts while also using evidence that is explicitly shown or told to us.

In short, it isn’t to say that, “The prequels and sequels are good movies,” but it is to say that, “Saying ‘X does not make any sense’ is false, given from what is inferred from, shown or told in the films.”

It is fine if you do not like any of these movies, in fact, go ahead, but I just want to help you guys understand them better, to see what George Lucas, Jonathan Hales, J.J. Abrams, Lawrence Kasdan, Rian Johnson and Chris Terrio were all going for, whether it was intentional or accidental.

I would like to note that the information stated throughout the essay is only from the movies, there is not going to be any mention of information from ancillary material such as the movie novelizations, as I agree with the notion that one should not have to go outside of a movie and rely on ancillary material in order to fix major story flaws so the movie would make logical sense and be enjoyable by itself.

Throughout the essay, you are going to be noticing things in bold with others usually being in a regular font emphasis; anything that is in bold represents the criticisms I shall be dealing with, and anything that uses a regular font emphasis represents the responses themselves to the criticisms — italics will appear every now and then, but only in the case of, well… putting titles in italics, as well as emphasizing some of the more specific points.

For each film, the criticisms and their respective responses are going to be lined up in a way as if you are going through the movie from start to finish.

And be warned, I may come across as a little stern, but I just hope you guys understand the points I am trying to make throughout the essay…

I really want some feedback for this draft; I feel it needs a bit more elaboration, or I might be framing or wording things incorrectly, there also might be things you could add to this.

Anyway, thoughts? Suggestions for the draft of this section?

Post
#1423937
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker Expanded Edition by Rae Carson: The &quot;Tragedy of Vader&quot; Edit (WIP)
Time

I can kinda see what you mean when you say that if he’s Force sensitive it kinda diminishes the idea that anyone could defect from the First Order.

Not necessarily, I said that it diminishes the idea of him BEING your average Joe who learns to stop running away and start fighting for the cause, it’s part of what makes Finn so great.

Post
#1423762
Topic
In defense of Rey Palpatine in <em>The Rise of Skywalker</em>, and why I do not think it undermines her arc in <em>The Last Jedi</em>.
Time

@SparkySywer

I shall clarify.

In TFA and TLJ, Rey focused heavily on her parents, they were the ones who conceived her, birthed her and abandoned her on the hell that is Jakku. She hoped there has to be some reason as to why her parents abandoned her, like being important in a way it would, for example, motivate her parents to abandon her, showing how they loved her. Of course, Rey comes to terms with the truth in TLJ and stops caring about her parents, but just because she stopped caring about them doesn’t indicate as to whether she cares about her grandparents or not.

Rey is absolutely scared of her Palpatine heritage in TRoS, because, due to her lack of self-worth, she fears being rejected by everyone, she fears about what everyone else would think if they find out of her heritage, she fears that no one is going to give her validation if they find out her heritage. This is implied in some later scenes, including her following conversation with Finn (“Rey, I know you…” “People keep telling me they know me. I’m afraid no one does…”).

Post
#1423539
Topic
In defense of Rey Palpatine in <em>The Rise of Skywalker</em>, and why I do not think it undermines her arc in <em>The Last Jedi</em>.
Time

Your point that “Rey overcame her low self-esteem in TLJ” and that “TRoS undermines this” is like saying that “she stopped caring about her parents in TFA just because she stopped waiting for them on Jakku and that TLJ undermines/undoes this by saying that Rey still cares about her parents.”

Just because Rey stopped waiting for her parents to return for her on Jakku in TFA, doesn’t mean she stopped caring about them entirely; in the exact same way, just because Rey seems happy at the end of TLJ, doesn’t mean she’s overcome her core belief that she is worthless (in fact, we see her happy in several scenes in the trilogy, especially BEFORE the TLJ reveal, but that doesn’t mean she ISN’T held back by this core belief).

Now, you’ll probably say the same thing about her TRoS arc, that “just because Rey defeated Palps, doesn’t mean she overcame her core belief that she is completely worthless,” but I digress. In fact, there’s a few indications she’s overcome her core belief of self-worthlessness by the end of TRoS:

  • Her pulling in the Skywalker lightsaber and grasping it at that moment alone implies she finally feels worthy, especially since this is the same lightsaber she felt unworthy of using twice, during one of her scenes with Leia and during her time on Ahch-To before Luke showed up.

  • Basically this entire Reddit comment.

  • At the end of TRoS, Rey finally feels worthy of naming herself “Skywalker” and continuing their legacy, whereas on Pasaana during that interaction with that little girl basically this happens: “What’s your name?” “Just Rey.” Note that this is before the climax on Exegol, so at this point on Pasaana, Rey is still held back by her core belief.

It’s not that Rey cared about her grandparents, it’s that the reason her Palpatine heritage is such a big deal to her, personally, is because she is related to the Sith Lord who murdered trillions; on top of that, it’s part of the reason she exiles herself onto Ahch-To until Luke pointed out that she is still valuable and can still do the right thing regardless of her heritage.

I meant that Rey was “unaffected” at the Battle of Crait in the sense that, well… there is a criticism that Rey should have been heavily affected by the parental reveal itself (warning, it’s from /r/saltierthancrait), which I disagree with since the reason she seems happy during Crait is because it means she has finally stopped caring about her parents themselves entirely.

Rey’s relationship by itself with Palpatine isn’t the point, the point is how the reveal of her Palpatine heritage affects her, and that she overcomes it when she learns from Luke that she is still valuable and can still do the right thing regardless of her heritage.

I think you should try re-watching TRoS (and by extension, TFA & TLJ), at least several times, with my interpretations in mind, in the hope that you can see as to where I am coming from regarding everything I said about Rey in this thread and the comment section.

Post
#1423324
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker Expanded Edition by Rae Carson: The &quot;Tragedy of Vader&quot; Edit (WIP)
Time

Made it more clear why Kylo is only reforging his mask now: he was waiting until he destroyed the Resistance, but now that he is about to steal everything from Palpy he feels encouraged enough to do it now. The mask is the symbol of the Ren dynasty.

It was already clear in TRoS that Kylo re-built the mask because he is more confident than in TFA and TLJ, he’s so confident in killing Palpatine and getting Rey to join him. We see him calmly and contently embracing Vader’s mask, as opposed to in The Force Awakens, when he was more anxious and insecure.

In the first movie, he tried to hide behind the mask as much as possible, whereas here in TRoS he took it on and off as he pleased.

Post
#1423058
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker Expanded Edition by Rae Carson: The &quot;Tragedy of Vader&quot; Edit (WIP)
Time

I agree, but since the message wasn’t sent out to the entire galaxy in my version, it makes sense that it seems like this is the first everyone has heard about it all.

Didn’t you do this just to line up with CF’s TRoS novel edit, which (I believe?) used that edit to line up with Hal’s edit?

Personally, I feel like Palpatine wouldn’t send a message like that to the entire galaxy until he has possessed either Rey or Kylo. Otherwise, he is essentially claiming victory before his plan has gone through.

It’s called “spreading fear,” he’s done this with the first Death Star so no one would rebel against the Empire.

Post
#1423049
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker Expanded Edition by Rae Carson: The &quot;Tragedy of Vader&quot; Edit (WIP)
Time

A while back I proposed not only a new crawl but also change the “somehow Palpatine returned” scene so the information Poe and his group explain to the Resistance be that Palps is going to unleash the Final Order soon.

I feel that Hal removed the broadcast in his crawl and put it in Poe’s message because of the criticism of Palpatine revealing himself to the galaxy and how it’s “out-of-character” for him since “he should know that it’ll result in the galaxy defeating him,” which I do not really agree with, since Palpatine was overconfident and even then he had no reason to think the galaxy knew that the Wayfinders existed and that as far as he knows the galaxy does not know where he is.

I proposed the Poe idea since I feel it’s pointless to mention the broadcast to be heard across the galaxy and then have the Resistance be unaware of it until Poe brings in the information (I believe it’s been pointed out in this website before).

Also, do you plan on doing an edit for the TFA novel?

Post
#1423008
Topic
In defense of Rey Palpatine in <em>The Rise of Skywalker</em>, and why I do not think it undermines her arc in <em>The Last Jedi</em>.
Time

One of the more common criticisms of The Rise of Skywalker is that it apparently retcons Rey’s lineage and reveals that she is actually Palpatine’s granddaughter; people assume it undermines the point of her being “nobody” and the supposed idea that “Force-sensitives do not come from bloodlines”…

I should start off by saying that her arc in The Last Jedi is not about her being “nobody” or about “finding [her] place in all this,” contrary to popular belief, but instead about how she learns to stop caring about and move from her parents entirely, coming to terms with the truth that they, as Kylo Ren puts it, “threw [her] away like garbage.”

In The Last Jedi, Rey refuses to accept this truth — even going as far as denying this when Kylo Ren taunts her during one of their conversations —, instead having lied to herself for the past several years of her life that they truly cared for her, that she was worth something to them, that she was abandoned for some important reason which would “show” that her parents cared for her, reinforcing this lie as a way of ensuring it would not perish — henceforth helping her feel happy and thus pushing away her feelings of self-worthlessness.

Rey, however, is unsure as to what that “importance” exactly is, and thus hopes that if she does find out she is important then it would “show” that her parents loved her and abandoned her to, say, hide her in an act of protection.

It is, for this reason, she, for so long, has wanted to find out as to who her parents were, hoping to infer as to what her “importance” is, only so she would use it to reinforce her lie — and why she hoped for Luke to show her this “importance,” hoping to use that importance to justify her parents abandoning her; however, when Luke refused, she goes into the mirror cave, hoping for it to show her parents to her — by seeing her parents, she would get to see who they exactly were, and, in turn, infer as to what her “importance” exactly is, judging their appearances.

In the throne room aboard the Supremacy, Kylo Ren, having learned from their touching of hands as to how Rey wanted to find out who her parents were, as well as the truth of her parents, manipulates her into admitting said truth — in that moment, she begins to refuse her lie, coming to terms with the truth that her parents had no true reason for abandoning her, that they hated her, seeing her as nothing but a worthless piece of junk.

(At this point, Rey admits her parents were “nobody,” in the sense they had no important reason to abandon her, instead discarding her as though she is completely worthless; she has “no place in this story” in the sense that, again, her parents did not abandon her because she was of some “importance” and they loved her, they abandoned her because, to them… she is worthless.)

Because of this, she finally overcomes her “need” for her parents, learning to move on from and stop caring for her parents entirely — hence why she does not seem to be affected by the truth of her parents during the Battle of Crait; now, with no other option, with Luke having rejected her, with Kylo Ren being the bad guy, with Han Solo now dead, with her parents having thrown her away like garbage, she decides to attach herself to the Resistance and rely on them for validation.

Secondly, Rey being the granddaughter of Palpatine in The Rise of Skywalker is a way of reinforcing her irrational, toxic core belief that she is worthless.

Ever since her abandonment, Rey came to the conclusion that the only reason her parents could have abandoned her is if she is inherently worthless, and over the next several years of her life, up until adulthood, when her parents did not return for her, this belief became internalized, becoming an unconscious core belief — consciously forgotten by Rey, although it still influences her conscious feelings and decisions; similar to in real life, where core beliefs start out during childhood as regular, conscious conclusions, and over time, up until adulthood, they become internalized, unconscious… consciously forgotten by you — you are unaware it even exists in the first place —, yet it still influences your conscious feelings and decisions.

This core belief leeches off her feelings of happiness, and because of this she desperately relies on others for validation and approval, hoping for it to help her feel happy and push these nasty feelings of self-worthlessness away — this is the lie Rey believes, that worth only comes from other people, that she is only worth something if other people think she is, due to her lack of self-value; what Rey needed was to come to terms with the truth, that being how self-worth comes from within and not from other people.

Her reliance on others for validation and approval is shown throughout the trilogy, for example she bypasses the compressor on the Millennium Falcon after Han Solo initially dismisses her, even literally spelling it out to him, only for him to shrug it off without caring, causing Rey to look disappointed — this implies she relies on others for validation, which, in turn, also implies she has a lack of any self-value.

Her character arc in The Rise of Skywalker starts off with her receiving a vision of herself as a Sith, ruling on the Sith throne — she begins to fear the mere idea of her turning to the dark side, convinced that no one is going to give her approval if she were to turn to the dark side; hence why she begins to feel unworthy of being a Jedi and using a lightsaber, convinced she would become a Sith if she remains a Jedi and continues using a lightsaber.

Of course, Rey learns of a truth even worse than that of her parents throwing her away like garbage… she is Palpatine’s granddaughter — she begins to fear of what the wider galaxy would think of her if they find out who she is, since her grandfather is the Sith lord who not only destroyed the Jedi Order but also made the galaxy suffer under the rule of the Galactic Empire and was also responsible for the destruction of Alderaan.

Upon injuring Kylo Ren during their duel, she becomes convinced that her heritage is the thing that is causing her to continually give into the dark side — since this is the first time she had given into the dark side after she learned the truth of her heritage. Because of this, she exiles herself, convinced she is meant to end up just like her grandfather, still held back by her belief that no one is going to give her approval if she were to become a Sith.

Luke Skywalker, aware of her heritage, shows up to her and dismisses what she believes, explaining to her that her value is determined by her heart and not her heritage — proven to be true by Leia deciding to train her, despite how she has acknowledged who Rey truly was — and that said heritage does not define who she is and how her future is going to turn out, urging her to face her fear, confront Palpatine and save the galaxy; this convinces her that she is able to do the right thing, regardless of her heritage.

Right at this point is the first time Rey truly acknowledges the existence of her core belief of self-worthlessness and how it has been holding her back her entire life — when Luke informed her that, “Confronting fear is the destiny of a Jedi,” she applied this to her fear, that being her feelings of self-worthlessness.

Of course, she goes to confront Palpatine on Exegol and gets her ass whopped by him, leaving her heavily weakened. Feeling unable to defeat Palpatine on her own, she turns to the Jedi of the past for support; in response, they encourage her to try her best to defeat Palpatine, regardless of how puny she is in comparison to him — now, she has enough strength to not only refuse the lie she had believed her entire life, that she is worthless, that she is only worth something if other people think she is, but also rise and stand against Palpatine.

He dismisses her as nothing, no match for the “power in [him];” instead of succumbing to his remarks, she ignores them and responds back with her own, self-made sense of self-worth and self-esteem… that “she… is all the Jedi,” and the icing on the cake is that she has pulled in the Skywalker lightsaber, the weapon she has felt unworthy of using for so long — she finally feels worthy.

No longer held back by her irrational, toxic core belief that she is worthless, having come to terms with the truth that worth and acceptance comes from within and not from other people, Rey destroys Palpatine — the embodiment of this belief — once and for all.

The ending of The Rise of Skywalker further reinforces how Rey is no longer held back by this core belief.

For one, when asked her name on Pasaana she simply responds that she is “just Rey,” when at that point she was still held back by her core belief, whereas on Tatooine, now no longer held back by her core belief, when asked her name, she responds, “Rey Skywalker,” — this implies Rey finally feels worthy of naming herself as a Skywalker.

Secondly, the sequence parallels her beginnings on Jakku, as a way of showing how much Rey has grown as a character up until this point; in the first film, Rey is held back by her core belief of self-worthlessness, spending her days on Jakku, hoping for her parents to come back so they would give her validation, helping her feel happy, thus pushing back her feelings of self-worthlessness — whereas at the end, Rey has already overcome her core belief, she is now happy and accepts herself, she no longer relies on other people for approval. On top of that, in the first film she looks at that old woman on Jakku with worry and fear, that she would end up having lived her life sad, whereas here she has matured, she looks at the old woman, this time knowing she would grow old happily, descriptive of her own self-value.

I should also end off by addressing one common misconception of her arc in The Last Jedi, that being her parents were nobody in the sense Rey was not from some super-duper important bloodline — she was more specifically focusing on her parents, not anyone else in her bloodline such as ancestors, her parents were the ones who abandoned her and she wanted to feel as though they truly cared about her, to cope with her irrational, toxic core belief.

Even then, just because her parents — the ones who conceived and birthed her — were nobody, does not mean her other ancestors were nobody. It is also for this reason I do not really get the notion that “Rey nobody showed to us that Force-sensitives do not come from super-duper important bloodlines,” especially when this was already inferable throughout the Skywalker saga.

Post
#1422640
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker Expanded Edition by Rae Carson: The &quot;Tragedy of Vader&quot; Edit (WIP)
Time

Jar Jar Bricks said:

Luke in ESB wants to take down Vader because he supposedly killed his father. So he becomes a Jedi because he feels like he is doing his father proud. All of that is completely shattered when the truth is revealed to him.

Really? I thought it was because Vader was the bad guy and was putting Han and Leia in danger.

Post
#1422569
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker Expanded Edition by Rae Carson: The &quot;Tragedy of Vader&quot; Edit (WIP)
Time

@JJB Once you begin doing a TLJ novel edit, do you have any plans to make the way I see Rey’s TLJ arc clear so there wouldn’t be any misconceptions of it being a “Rey wants to find her place in all this” kind of thing?

Below:

In The Last Jedi, Rey refuses to accept the truth that her parents, as Kylo Ren puts it, “threw [her] away like garbage” — even going as far as denying this when Kylo Ren taunts her during one of their conversations —, instead having lied to herself for the past several years of her life that they truly cared for her, that she was worth something to them, that she was abandoned for some important reason which would “show” that her parents cared for her, reinforcing this lie as a way of ensuring it would not perish — henceforth helping her feel happy and thus pushing away her feelings of self-worthlessness.

Rey, however, is unsure as to what that “importance” exactly is, and thus hopes that if she does find out she is important then it would “show” that her parents loved her and abandoned her to, say, hide her in an act of protection.

It is, for this reason, she, for so long, has wanted to find out as to who her parents were, hoping to infer as to what her “importance” is, only so she would use it to reinforce her lie — and why she hoped for Luke to show her this “importance,” hoping to use that importance to justify her parents abandoning her; however, when Luke refused, she goes into the mirror cave, hoping for it to show her parents to her — by seeing her parents, she would get to see who they exactly were, and, in turn, infer as to what her “importance” exactly is, judging their appearances.

In the throne room aboard the Supremacy, Kylo Ren, having learned from their touching of hands as to how Rey wanted to find out who her parents were, as well as the truth of her parents, manipulates her into admitting said truth — in that moment, she begins to refuse her lie, coming to terms with the truth that her parents had no true reason for abandoning her, that they hated her, seeing her as nothing but a worthless piece of junk.

(At this point, Rey admits her parents were “nobody,” in the sense they had no important reason to abandon her, instead discarding her as though she is completely worthless; she has “no place in this story” in the sense that, again, her parents did not abandon her because she was of some “importance” and they loved her, they abandoned her because, to them… she is worthless.)

Because of this, she finally overcomes her “need” for her parents, learning to move on from and stop caring for her parents entirely — hence why she does not seem to be affected by the truth of her parents during the Battle of Crait; now, with no other option, with Luke having rejected her, with Kylo Ren being the bad guy, with Han Solo now dead, with her parents having thrown her away like garbage, she decides to attach herself to the Resistance and rely on them for validation.