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NeverarGreat

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11-Sep-2012
Last activity
21-Jan-2021
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Post
#1397180
Topic
Unusual <strong>Sequel Trilogy</strong> Radical Redux Ideas Thread
Time

Also, aren’t the First Order officers talking about stepping up raids to get more kids in TROS, something that is referenced to happen on Kimiji?

There doesn’t seem an easy way to go in either direction with this. On the one hand, cutting the child conscription makes the sequels even more reliant on OT concepts, while leaning into the child conscription only highlights Finn’s bizarre actions.

Post
#1397162
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker: Ascendant (Released)
Time

The final shot is perfect, wonderful work!

The first shot is improved but I noticed there’s a bit of wobble between planet and ship, perhaps the extending of the shot made it more obvious. Not a big deal either way. There’s also a bit of a ‘cutout’ look to the ship overlaying the planet here, maybe putting some light bleed from the planet around the edges of the ship would blend the elements more, especially since the sunlight glare on the planet now overlaps part of the ship. Some effect like this, though maybe not quite so dramatic:

ship over planet

Post
#1396987
Topic
George Lucas's Sequel Trilogy
Time

George Lucas: When writing the movies, I tried to make sure that aliens and droids got killed, but not people.

Paul Duncan: A lot of stormtroopers died.

George Lucas: That’s right, but you didn’t know they were people. We did kill three humans and that was unfortunate. I was always bothered by it.

Paul Duncan: When was that?

George Lucas: On the Death Star, when Han and Luke go into the prison with Chewie to rescue Leia, they shoot three Imperial guys. The guards drew their guns and fired first, but it’s still a shame.

Paul Duncan: Really?

George Lucas: Yeah, we very consciously didn’t kill very many humans in those movies.

Paul Duncan: What about the stormtroopers? They look robotic, but they’re not.

George Lucas: How do you know what they are?

Paul Duncan: Did you have a different idea of what they were?

George Lucas: Yeah, they started out as clones. Once all the clones were killed, the Empire picked up recruits, like militia.

This is so strange to me. Are aliens and clones not people to George? Besides, what about everyone Luke blew up with the Death Star? I guess as long as we don’t see their faces, their death doesn’t count. And what about the good dozen Rebels gunned down by Stormtroopers in the first scene, or Captain Antilles who had his neck crushed, or crispy Owen and Beru…

Like, I don’t want to say this flippantly, but this seems like an artist in willful denial of the content of his art.

Post
#1396983
Topic
What do you like about the EU Pre-Disney?
Time

JackNapier said:

NeverarGreat said:

I like the idea of Jedi having families and children like normal people, especially since it makes their extermination by Vader a thousand times more tragic.

I actually never knew that this was a thing.

I only read of it in Children of the Jedi, an otherwise underwhelming book.

Most of the old Thrawn trilogy works for me (sans Luuke), and I really liked the inclusion of truly alien Celestial technology in Corellia’s Centerpoint Station for example. Really, the old EU had a lot of stock and unremarkable stories but was built on the foundations of a more interesting universe than the new EU.

Post
#1396977
Topic
<strong>The Clone Wars</strong> (2008 animated tv series) - general discussion thread
Time

Knight of Kalee said:

NeverarGreat said:

Knight of Kalee said:

Well it’s nice to hear you’ve already past the point where TCW took a decisive leap on quality, so prepare yourself for a treat. Seasons 3 onward feature some of the most nuanced, dark and overall well-written arcs.

We just watched the Darkness on Umbara arc, and it was pretty impressive, especially the first three episodes and most of the fourth. Not a huge fan of the one-note villiany at the end, but other than that it was rather astonishing considering the target demographic.

I concur with you that Krell’s turn could have been developed better, yet I still can’t forget how cold I felt after seeing the clones attack each other.

True, I really wasn’t expecting them to go that far.

Post
#1396910
Topic
<strong>The Clone Wars</strong> (2008 animated tv series) - general discussion thread
Time

Knight of Kalee said:

Well it’s nice to hear you’ve already past the point where TCW took a decisive leap on quality, so prepare yourself for a treat. Seasons 3 onward feature some of the most nuanced, dark and overall well-written arcs.

We just watched the Darkness on Umbara arc, and it was pretty impressive, especially the first three episodes and most of the fourth. Not a huge fan of the one-note villiany at the end, but other than that it was rather astonishing considering the target demographic.

Post
#1396744
Topic
<strong>The Clone Wars</strong> (2008 animated tv series) - general discussion thread
Time

I’m watching this series for the first time with my girlfriend (on her suggestion) but watching only these suggested episodes for brevity. We’re almost through season 3 and I wanted to give a couple of thoughts.

We are pleasantly surprised at the quality of the episodes overall. Granted neither of us had high expectations, but we’re enjoying the humor of the droids and the fast pace of the episodes. Even a lesser episode is better for not wasting too much time.

The animation is good and keeps getting better, and I definitely like it more than Rebels. In fact there’s a slightly more mature tone in Clone Wars than in Rebels, which is welcome.

As for the bad, well, it’s still a kid’s show and suffers all the pitfalls of a Saturday morning cartoon. The plots can be repetitive, the action can become tedious, and the morals are often blunt and simplistic. Where the show tries to become more nuanced (so far, we’re only through the Mortis Arc), it merely becomes muddled and confusing.

The heroes an villains of the show suffer from aggressive plot armor syndrome, and lightsaber battles are becoming mere light shows. Consider, for contrast, the lightsaber encounters of the original trilogy: most of the scenes involving a lightsaber end with dismemberment or death. Granted there’s only so much you can do with a kid’s show, but every time a lightsaber is sheathed unbloodied, its power and danger is diminished, and this ethos of indestructible characters has carried over to the Mandalorian.

The overall impression I get going into Season 4 of this show is that the Clone Wars are a game - in every sense of the word. Although surrounded by death and battling for the soul of the Republic, none of our main characters seem to truly care about the damage inflicted or are truly affected by it. Each episode opens with a glib moral presumably relating to the content of the episode, followed by the announcer setting the stage. It would make sense as a sort of in-universe Republic propaganda, but it’s not nearly clear enough on this point if so. Whereas another show aimed at kids might show smaller moments between battles to illustrate moral points while keeping the battles themselves as backdrop, Clone Wars often weaves the morality tales directly into the battles, regardless of its effect on the seriousness of the situation. Even episodes without the focus on the Jedi have this issue.

ARC Troopers is a good example of this problem. Here’s the moral:

“Fighting a war tests a soldier’s skills, defending his home tests a soldier’s heart.”

That might as well be the moral of the show. The Clone Wars are often merely an exercise in the ability to deal cold destruction. There’s some kind of sense to this, given that the enemies are machines, but many battles suffer clone and civilian casualties, which often go unmarked. In subsequent shows this moral still seems to be in effect, with Stormtroopers and Rebels being the cannon fodder. Troops rarely flee battle, and only retreat under huge losses. Mourning consists of a brief downturned mouth and eyes.

But okay, it’s a kid’s show. It’s not supposed to show realistic mayhem and horror, right? Indeed, but this show ends up sanitizing and idealizing the process of war to the point that it feels truly alien. There’s no shame in avoiding the grim realities of war in a kid’s show to focus on small moments and the mobilization that happens behind the front lines. That is the Clone Wars kid’s show that I keep wanting to see, and episodes like Heroes on Both Sides feel like a breath of fresh air amid the endless spinning lightsabers and blaster fire.

Here’s to hoping the later seasons move in this direction.

Post
#1396706
Topic
The Rise of Skywalker: Ascendant (Released)
Time

poppasketti said:

Hey everyone,

I finally had a little free time and was able to make an effort to add Coruscant into the board room meeting scene!

https://vimeo.com/494722697
pw: fanedit

The new FX shots are at :06, 1:23, and 1:25. There’s no audio because the clip I had to work from didn’t have audio, but I can add that later!

Nice work!

I did notice an oddity though in the final two shots. On the right hand side of the frame the planet’s smaller city ‘rings’ are properly oval so close to the horizon line, but the left hand side rings are almost circular where they should also be oval.

Though if I wasn’t looking for problems I probably wouldn’t have noticed it. 😉

Post
#1395551
Topic
Star Wars: <strong>The Rise Of Skywalker</strong> Redux Ideas thread
Time

For everyone arguing that Rey’s power in TFA wasn’t unusual…the creator of that movie made a sequel to it where he acknowledges that it is unusual and explains it by tying her by blood to the most powerful Force user in the galaxy. I don’t remember the name of that movie, it might come to me later.

Regardless, TFA is designed to raise questions about Rey’s parentage and her unusual affinity to the Force. Otherwise TLJ wouldn’t try to explain it by tying it to a Force equation involving Kylo and JJ wouldn’t have tried to make her the spawn of Space Satan.

This isn’t to forgive TFA’s choices - a movie should stand on its own merits. The real issue with Rey’s power in that film is that it requires extra context to appreciate, and not because it’s necessarily unusually strong based on the prior films, but because it feels unearned.

Take the scene of Luke levitating a saber in the Wampa cave. Someone watching this film after the first one could complain that this is a bogus and overpowered new ability, but the scene sells that this power is the only thing that will save Luke’s life and he struggles mightily to achieve it. The music and camerawork, the sense of peril, all were necessary to generate the need for this new power.

Rey in contrast is never in mortal peril in her moments of crisis. Rather, in each one she chooses to pit herself against a superior opponent and comes out on top, sometimes to her own astonishment. And this makes all the difference in terms of earning a power versus merely acquiring it.

Post
#1394917
Topic
<em>The Mandalorian</em> Discussion Thread - * <em><strong>SPOILERS</strong></em> *
Time

I just got to watch the last episode, and I’ve gotta say, that was certainly a…thing…that happened.

First, the Good:

The opening was solid, and the cruiser incursion was pretty good. The fight between Gideon and Mando was so much better than the previous fights with the Beskar spear, the glowing of the metal really helped sell the danger of the Darksaber. The Dark Troopers were similarly intimidating and well-utilized in the episode. Also, it was nice to see an all-female strike team in action. Din and the child were wonderful, and him taking off his helmet wasn’t cheapened by its removal in the previous episode for me since it felt like an organic process of slowly opening up to others. Luke’s role was good…on paper. Which leads me to

The Bad:

I’m not going to comment on Luke’s physical appearance here, since it’s been discussed enough. Rather, the far bigger problem for me was the way in which he was introduced.

From the moment the X-wing touches down on the cruiser, we suspect it’s Luke, even casual viewers such as my girlfriend who immediately asked ‘That can’t be Luke, can it? Is it Luke?!’ The question is almost immediately answered as we are treated to the cloaked figure and then the green lightsaber as he mows down dozens of droids leading to the bridge. Cut back to the bridge where we see everyone watching on the screens as this guy lays waste to the droids, and finally he arrives in the last hallway where we have another action scene of him destroying machinery in highly theatrical ways. Finally the doors open to reveal…Luke. The guy we revealed two scenes ago. He stands calmly, almost serenely, as our heroes behold him in almost religious awe. Artoo is by his side like an attendant cherubim, and Luke says the proper words to receive the child.

So yeah, this feels peak fanservice to me, and not in a good way. How much better it would have been if we had seen only the X-wing arriving, then had the droids continue their assault on the bridge? They might bring their weapons to bear on the door, and as it glowed red hot from their assault and they began to break through we would finally hear a commotion behind them and they would stop their assault. Din moves forward to investigate. Through a hole in the melting door he would see flashes and blaster fire. Could that be the sound of a lightsaber? Finally, a bright light flashes through the still-melted door accompanied by the squeal of a final dying droid, and is quickly drawn back.

Silence.

Din moves to open the door, his hand over the button. One of the others protests in fear, not knowing who or what is on the other side. Din lowers his hand. Then a deep rumble permeates the bridge, and the door moves of its own, to reveal a small, cloaked figure, his hood up. Behind him lie smoking remains. He lowers his hood. “Did someone call for a Jedi?” His eyes move over the room, settling on Gideon. “I’m sorry, were those your droids?” The child peeks out from behind a panel. Luke catches himself, as if he’s seen a ghost.

You get the idea. It’s still fanservice, but it doesn’t waste time with mindless lightsaber action. The focus should still be on Din and the others, not on badass Luke. Now if they go with a somber, religious-icon Luke, fine, but I fear that they did it for the same reason they made Rouge One Leia into a Madonna-like figure - they are just too afraid of audience rejection to give them any character at all.

Believe it or not, I liked the episode overall. The core of the story remains, and it did a lot right. It just makes the parts where it stumbles that much more obvious.

Post
#1394284
Topic
Why I Love Prequel Yoda (and what I think people get wrong)
Time

DuracellEnergizer said:

NeverarGreat said:

act on instinct said:

Mocata said:

Yeah but it’s less like the reaction to mass murder and more like a case of indigestion.

Could say the same or worse about Leia to her home planet. It’s not Rabbit Hole.

To be fair, we never saw her reaction to its actual destruction, only getting back to her hours later.

Nevertheless, this is a failure of SW '77.

Or just a deliberate creative decision. Leia is still technically a supporting character to Luke, so it makes sense to merely imply some character moments. After all, they shot a reaction for her planet’s destruction but chose to cut it, probably to keep the focus on Luke.

Post
#1394157
Topic
<strong>Empire Strikes Back</strong> - 'Behind The Scenes / Making Of' <strong>images</strong> thread
Time

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ua2v64mh9o

Some cool alternate takes of Luke and Yoda here. Also, I think there’s a new low angle of the Super Star Destroyer for a second.

It would be really neat if someone put together all these little alternate takes/deleted moments and made an edit with them like they did in War of the Stars.