Sign In

fmalover

User Group
Members
Join date
21-Mar-2013
Last activity
27-Sep-2021
Posts
560

Post History

Post
#1450334
Topic
<strong>The Mandalorian</strong> - a general discussion thread - * <em><strong>SPOILERS</strong></em> *
Time

OK guys, I have finally caught up and watched both seasons. My thoughts:

The first two chapters were pretty meh, but chapter 3 is were the series really got me hooked. I love the fact that this series is for the most part disconnected from the main saga, although season 2 gets a little too fan service-y for my taste. I also like that they do away with the moralistic narrative of Good vs Evil and keep things simple. Din Djarin isn’t a hero, he’s just a bounty hunter doing his job, and since he’s now Manda’Lor, a role he clearly has no interest in, it will be interesting to see how this will pan out in season 3. As many have posted, I also hope season 3 takes the series back to being its own story away from the main saga.

The only episode I didn’t really like was The Jedi, mostly because I’m fed up with Ahsoka popping up in every single piece of expanded material, and since she’s Filoni’s pet character it’s not surprising that this particular episode was directed by him. That being said, props to Rosario Dawson for making an effort to sound like Ashley Eckstein.

About Luke appearing in the season 2 finale, I felt indifferent, and one thing that soured it was the internet comments using the cameo as an excuse to throw further shade at TLJ. “This is the Luke Skywalker we wanted to see. Shame on you Rian Johnson.” Please let it go.

Really looking forward to season 3, and I hope Kevin McKidd can reprise his role as Fenn Rau.

Post
#1449989
Topic
General Star Wars <strong>Random Thoughts</strong> Thread
Time

I agree with NeverarGreat.

I would also counter ZkinandBonez’s argument by pointing to another film series, The Matrix.

Towards the end of the movie Neo starts to realize his potential by dodging bullets (the legendary bullet time sequence) and by the end he fully awakens as the One, doing stuff no other redpill can accomplish like flying, stopping bullets and fighting one-on-one with Agents, so having Anakin doing something spectacular with the Force wouldn’t have been that much of a stretch in 2002.

Post
#1449970
Topic
General Star Wars <strong>Random Thoughts</strong> Thread
Time

Since Rey’s godlike mastery of the Force is being discussed, I want to say that if there’s one thing that bothered me most about the PT, it’s how everyone goes on about how strong Anakin is with the Force, but we never see him do anything noteworthy in AotC and RotS other than basic stuff like telekinetically moving stuff around or boosting his jumps. Now I’m not saying he should have breezed through waves of enemies Force Unleashed style, it’s just that I would consider this a case of “Show, don’t tell”.

Post
#1449529
Topic
Unpopular Opinion Thread
Time

I love the Mustafar lightsaber duel.

If there’s one lightsaber duel everyone seems to love but I personally think is the most overrated, it would be the one between Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon vs Darth Maul, way too choreographed.

If I had to pick an all-time favourite lightsaber duel, it would be Anakin and Obi-Wan vs Dooku in RotS. It’s brief, simple and elegantly choreographed.

Post
#1449434
Topic
Last movie seen
Time

Just finished watching Evangelion 3+1: Thrice Upon a Time, in fact I waited until all four Rebuild of Evangelion movies were released so I could watch them all.

The first two RoE movies are basically a retelling of the original series, a major difference being that the Angels are far more powerful and the battles are far more epic and destructive. However the climax of the second movie is where RoE wildly diverges from the original series.

In many ways RoE could be considered a counterpoint to the original series, as Shinji is a lot less mopey, the movies are far more action-packed and less psychological and the story ends on a hopeful note compared to The End of Evangelion which had a rather bleak ending.

Overall very enjoyable. The only character that left me puzzled was Mari.

Post
#1448883
Topic
What do you think of the <strong>Sequel Trilogy</strong>? a general discussion thread
Time

Servii said:

The Rebellion didn’t treat Luke that way. They didn’t hinge all their hopes on whether or not he showed up to help. Despite his abilities, he was still just one man, and one small part of a larger faction. The fact that the Resistance is so hyper focused on recruiting someone who, as far as they know, abandoned their cause years ago, and is hopeful that he’ll return, is naive and reflects poorly on them.

He’s still just one man, regardless of his powers, and it takes a long time to train a new generation of Jedi, so that’s hardly an immediate concern for the First Order. The line in TLJ when Rey tells Luke he needs to “bring the Jedi back” to stop Kylo Ren is really odd, since it makes it seem like Luke can just flip a switch and restore the Jedi after years of sitting around.

It’s also odd that Snoke is more focused on finding Luke than he is on destroying the Republic. His priorities seem backwards. He and the First Order have much bigger fish to fry than an inactive Luke who might be a potential threat in the future, yet Snoke talks about finding Luke like it’s the most important step in winning the war. But if the Republic and Resistance were destroyed, Luke coming out of hiding would be a nuisance, at best.

After accomplishing the feat of destroying the the Death Star, you don’t see Luke being treated with any sort of reverence in TESB. He’s still just a squad pilot among many, and his mastery of the Force is merely a personal journey. Absolutely nobody amongst the Rebellion shows the slightest concern with reviving the Jedi Order, because the conflict between the Jedi and the Sith was one of many narratives in the OT.

This is echoed in the PT, where the Jedi Order have grown to overestimate their role in the Galaxy, as Luke points out in TLJ, so much so that when the Jedi Order is dismantled nobody cares.

The ST contradicts this by turning the Jedi Order into a vital component of galactic society. Max Von Sydow’s character says that without the Jedi there can be no balance. There’s this bizarre belief that Luke must be brought back into the fold and Snoke worrying about the potential return of the Jedi Order strikes me as paranoid and a little psychotic.

Post
#1448754
Topic
What do you think of the <strong>Sequel Trilogy</strong>? a general discussion thread
Time

Servii said:

JJ Abrams even wanted the movie to end with Luke surrounded by floating rocks, to wow the audience by showing off how powerful Luke was.

I remember reading that interview, and frankly I find that to be a very asinine idea, confirming that all Abrams is capable of doing is officially sanctioned big budget fan films.

Post
#1448524
Topic
What do you think of the <strong>Sequel Trilogy</strong>? a general discussion thread
Time

SparkySywer said:

JadedSkywalker said:

some weird non commercial midichlorian movie.

That’s not the sequel trilogy that Lucas pitched. He’s had four entirely separate ideas for STs (that we know about, I wouldn’t be surprised if there were many more we don’t know about), and chronologically, it seems like that’s the second one of the four.

Shopping Maul said:

I see Star Wars in general as being a ‘band effort’ rather than the sole vision of one man. Yes, SW is/was Lucas’ creation, but the input of folks like Kurtz, Dykstra, MacQuarrie, Johnston, Burt, Marcia Lucas, Kershner, Kasdan etc etc really helped shape this universe significantly. If anything I see the PT as the equivalent of Mick Jagger reforming the Stones with an all-new lineup. So I don’t buy into the ‘George as canon’ thing at all. A Lucas-ST probably would’ve sucked.

I 100% agree, and that’s probably the best explanation why I prefer the sequels to the prequels. The ST was made by fans, and while the fans have some pretty crazy ideas of what Star Wars is, they have a more holistic view. The prequels were just George Lucas putting in his own contribution, lacking everyone else’s vision which made Star Wars what it is.

In other words, the problem with the PT was that George Lucas had nobody to reign him in, whilst the ST had the opposite problem, which was that there wasn’t a single creative vision driving the trilogy.

Post
#1447922
Topic
Why Rogue One doesn't work well as a prequel to Star Wars
Time

jedi_bendu said:

fmalover said:

On that note, that’s one of my many gripes with Star Wars Rebels. Every episode ends in mission accomplished with no casualties for the rebels, thus making the victories of the OT a lot less impactful.

I’d guess you’re against the show existing at all then. You can’t exactly tell a story about the gradual formation of the Rebel Alliance by showing them getting crushed and defeated at every turn. There were always going to be small victories, the events of the OT and Rogue One are just the first major victories.

I’m not saying the rebels should have been crushed and defeated at every turn as you put it, but the fact that they never suffer any setbacks makes the Empire look incompetent. How about two steps forward one step back, then three steps forward one step back, four steps forward two steps back, the Rebel Alliance slowly gaining in strength, occasionally throw in a defeat that sets the Rebellion back from square 50 to square 35, certainly damaging but not enough to erode their determination. It would have made for a much more compelling narrative than the smooth sailing of victory after victory we got.

Post
#1447889
Topic
Why Rogue One doesn't work well as a prequel to Star Wars
Time

Servii said:

The fact that the Rebel Alliance is able to so quickly muster a large fleet like that so early in the war makes the fleet in RotJ less impactful.

On that note, that’s one of my many gripes with Star Wars Rebels. Every episode ends in mission accomplished with no casualties for the rebels, thus making the victories of the OT a lot less impactful.

Post
#1447708
Topic
Why Rogue One doesn't work well as a prequel to Star Wars
Time

Servii said:

fmalover said:

The way I see it, the Tantive IV and Leia were shoehorned into the movie as per Disney’s demands.

It would have made a lot more sense if the ship escaping from the Battle of Scarif wasn’t the Tantive IV.

It definitely seems like many of the continuity issues at the end of the film were a result of reshoots (the late addition of the Vader hallway scene comes to mind). I’d very much like to see a director’s cut and how the ending was meant to go originally.

I remember reading that originally Gareth Edwards intended for the movie to end with Jyn and Cassian being killed by Vader, but this ending was deemed too dark.

Post
#1447382
Topic
Your ideal Star Wars Sequel Trilogy
Time

Servii said:

Ideally, I would have preferred the Sequel Trilogy be made in the 90’s, before the prequel trilogy. But assuming that my hypothetical sequels had to come out in 2015, 2017, and 2019, here’s what I would probably do, off the top of my head:

At the start of VII, the galaxy is in a state of cold war, with the two largest galactic factions, the Republic and the Empire (still just called the Empire), having maintained a ceasefire for about a decade or so. Under the leadership of Gilad Pellaeon, and with the support of the mysterious Knights of Ren, the Empire has shifted away from its sinister past and become a less destructive, if still somewhat despotic faction. In the years since the ceasefire, the Knights of Ren have grown hugely in number, especially since they started recruiting within both Imperial and Republic space, with many former Jedi apprentices having left to join the secretive group.

Rey, Finn, and Poe will still be our main heroes. The protagonist of the trilogy will be Finn, a Stormtrooper who’s fiercely loyal to the Empire, while having a strong code of honor. He develops an unlikely friendship with Rey the scavenger and Poe the Republic pilot.

Covert attacks begin to take place against both the Republic and Empire, with each faction being framed for the attacks on the other. Agents within both governments carry out subversion to weaken the ceasefire and push the factions back towards open war. Finn is perhaps betrayed by one of these corrupt governors and left for dead on a desolate planet, where he meets Rey. After doing some investigating later on, the heroes might mistakingly suspect that the Knights of Ren are behind the attacks.

Leia is the chief executive of the Republic. Han is a Republic general. Lando has settled down as baron of another wealthy city. Luke leads a small, reclusive Jedi Order on a wilderness planet in the Mid Rim, still struggling with what the new Order’s role should be in the larger galaxy, especially with the ongoing cold war and the increasingly prominent Knights of Ren. Our heroes find Luke near the end of VII’s second act, and Finn, discovering his Force sensitivity, begins to train with him.

Eventually, near the end of VII, it’s discovered that these corrupt agents within both factions have been working together to destabilize the galaxy in preparation for a massive invasion. Luke perhaps sensed this imminent attack beforehand, and had investigated evidence of a prior invasion by the same species in the ancient past. Finn, Rey, and Poe discover a scout ship belonging to this species, and the climax of VII will be the start of the invasion of this species in full force. VII ends with the Empire being devastated first, and the Republic bracing itself for the oncoming storm. Gilad Pellaeon is killed. Luke and his apprentices come out of seclusion to defend the Republic, while the Knights of Ren begin to wage fierce guerilla warfare against the invaders that are now occupying Imperial worlds.

The climax of VIII will be the fall of Coruscant. Han or Leia is killed in this attack. By the end, both the Republic and Empire are scattered and in shambles. With the war seeming unwinnable, the Knights of Ren will become increasingly ruthless and desperate in their tactics, veering closer towards the Dark Side.

IX will be about 3 hours long. It will feature the Republic and Empire joining their forces for the first time in their history to repel the invaders.

Finn will now be a full Jedi Knight, leading a group of fellow Knights and padawans to different contested planets in need of being defended or reclaimed. Along the way, they encounter Kylo Ren and some of his Knights (I haven’t decided yet whether Kylo will be related to anyone. I’d also like to work him into the plots of VII and VIII, but I haven’t decided on what his role will be yet.), and the two groups join forces for a while. But it becomes clear through Kylo’s scorched-earth tactics that he is growing increasingly unhinged and aggressive to the point of bloodlust, and that he considers civilian lives entirely expendable as long as the Empire wins in the end.

Kylo becomes more and more obsessed with obtaining hidden knowledge to not just repel the invaders, but to destroy them utterly. This search eventually leads him to Korriban, where he and his Knights recover Sith holocrons and artifacts, and are at last fully consumed by the Dark Side.

The climax of IX will the joint Republic-Empire reclamation of Coruscant. The attack will be a major victory that cripples the invaders, forcing what’s left of their military to flee into the Unknown Regions. In the midst of the battle, the Knights of Ren arrive, using their new knowledge of the Dark Side to devastate the fleeing enemy. As the battle is winding down, the Republic and Empire discover that the invaders had already begun to transport their own civilians to settle on Coruscant and other newly conquered worlds. With the enemy forces in retreat, these civilians are left stranded on the planet, at the mercy of the victorious Republic and Empire. Kylo, being the highest ranking Imperial still alive, orders that they be put to death. Finn, Luke, and the other Jedi object to this, while the Republic overall is split on the issue.

In spite of this, Kylo and his troops (as well as some Republic troops, of their own accord) begin to carry out a purge of the planet, with the Jedi and some of the other Republic troops fighting against them. The situation devolves into planetwide chaos, and taking advantage of this as well as the Republic’s momentary indecision, Kylo assumes absolute control of Coruscant, declaring himself Emperor and Sith Lord. Kylo then kills Luke.

Finn, Rey, and Poe lead a final desperate mission to stop Kylo. Finn battles Kylo in a duel, defeats him, but spares his life, instead handing him over to be tried for his crimes.

In the aftermath of the War, the shattered Republic and Empire are at last dissolved, reformed into a galaxy-wide defensive coalition, prepared in the event that any such invasion or upheaval should happen again. Finn carries on Luke’s legacy as the new leader of the Jedi Order.

Bravo.

Post
#1447375
Topic
What do you think of the <strong>Sequel Trilogy</strong>? a general discussion thread
Time

JadedSkywalker said:

The worst aspect of the prequels wasn’t just the unnatural and unbelievable dialog and acting, or the fact that II and III were shot on Video instead of on film. Or the incredible bad cgi in Episode II. The total lack of verisimilitude and a used universe which the OT had in spades made everything look like a cheap 1990s computer game. There was also the moving away from established canon of the OT just because as the creator Lucas could retcon whatever he wanted. Even if 4 different special editions later the prequels and originals don’t inhabit the same mentality or continuity.

On the other hand the Disney movies are bad for lack of imagination and originality but you can have original bad like the prequels, or original bad like a sequel about Darth Maul which thankfully wasn’t made.

Safe filmaking is when you rely on callbacks and nostalgia that’s when you hire JJ Abrams. Lucas was right on the money for saying they made a film for the fans, but he could have worded it fanfilm or pastiche because that is all JJ does. The great remaker/remixer. Who saved Star Trek when it didn’t need to be saved, Saved MI when it didn’t need to be saved, and saved Star Wars when it didn’t need to be saved.

Several characters from the OT return, as well as the Millennium Falcon, there’s X-wings and TIE Fighters, but these movies don’t feel like Star Wars.

By now it’s obvious that Disney was merely appealing to fan nostalgia.