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Stardust1138

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18-Mar-2018
Last activity
24-Jun-2021
Posts
305

Post History

Post
#1436958
Topic
Star Wars: Battlefront 2 - controversy thoughts?
Time

Z6PO said:

The offline maps aren’t the same as the online ones, unfortunately. They’re significantly smaller, and they are fewer maps in offline than in online. Same for the game modes, fewer and lamer than online. Offline is meh. (But IIRC, every character is unlocked for offline play?)

Thank you for letting me know. That’s such a bummer honestly as it’s on sale for eighteen bucks at the moment. It might be better just waiting for Lego Star Wars and put it towards getting the Deluxe Edition as having the blue milk Luke minifigure and Rogue One characters DLC would be a lot more fun for roaming the galaxy since the game itself appears as though it will be the full game without any updates for new content. It’s a shame though that things are all DLC these days.

Post
#1436888
Topic
Star Wars: Battlefront 2 - controversy thoughts?
Time

I figured this was as good as any thread to ask as I’m thinking about getting Battlefront 2 and it may have already been addressed. I apologise if so. Does anyone know rather or not the updates downloaded on PSN for Battlefront 2 include everything? Like will I have access to all era content with planets and characters or will I have to grind it out to unlock them? I mainly ask because I don’t have online gameplay access at this time but would still like to play with certain characters and explore different worlds when playing offline modes.

Post
#1436886
Topic
<strong>STAR WARS: REBELS</strong> (animated tv series) - a general discussion thread
Time

jedi_bendu said:

To those who like Rebels and to those who don’t, I really recommend watching this fan-made documentary. It’s an hour and a half so obviously that’s a big ask, but I watched it over several days and found it extremely thoughtful and engaging. Sam Witwer even posted about it on twitter.

It really delves into the mythological inspirations behind Rebels, and there are many.

https://youtu.be/e622QkAAH9g

This looks so good! Definitely looking forward to watching it. There’s also a three part series on the channel about The Clone Wars that looks just as engaging.

Post
#1436503
Topic
Unpopular Opinion Thread
Time

jedi_bendu said:

I’ve finally come to the conclusion that Star Wars: Rebels is my favourite Star Wars series. It has my favourite romance in the franchise, my favourite master-apprentice duo, and many of my favourite moments - like Ben vs Maul and Ezra’s scene in the remaining piece of the Lothal Jedi temple. It tells a convincing account of the formation of the Rebel Alliance, while expanding the mythology of Star Wars in imaginative ways and keeping the story of a family unit forged in desperate times at its heart. Every character has episodes of development, including Chopper. It honours what came before by incorporating characters and vehicles from Legends and using McQuarrie’s art style as a basis for its visual style, as well as - for me at least - making the original trilogy more compelling. I could go on for hours.

At the end of the day, Rebels is the Star Wars story which makes me happy the most.

I’ve been getting back into Rebels and I think it’s up there as part of my favourite Disney era content. It’s making me feel like I may need to finally give Mandalorian a chance. With regards to Rebels though I think my favourite things about it are when it expands on the Force like with Bendu and the closure it gives with Maul. It honestly made me cry when he died after all these years. It was very eerie going back and watching his first fight with Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon’s last words. It was a very tragic feeling.

Post
#1436502
Topic
General Star Wars <strong>Random Thoughts</strong> Thread
Time

Mocata said:

I think most people prefer imaginative creativity though.

I’d say this is very imaginative. It’s been around for centuries through different important books such as the Bible and Torah, and then Richard Wagner introduced it to music. He was the first to give characters, objects, or ideas a reoccurring theme musically. George started using this idea with his roots in filmmaking visually and then musically over his six films at the suggestion of John Williams if I recall correctly. Although to be fair you can see it within American Graffiti and THX 1138. It shows up in not just the visuals and music but within the narrative of his films. Most notably with Anakin and Luke’s paralleled but different journeys. Similar to THX and Curt. With Star Wars though it goes beyond that as if you look closely Luke is more his mother’s son, while Leia is more her father’s daughter. Yet they have their own motives and sense of self. It’s more complicated and difficult than it looks to pull off. There’s layers and layers of depth within his six films. This is only tipping the iceberg. There’s also historical references and old cinema callbacks to name but two. I think it’s taken for granted just how much the stories connect to each other because of some “clunky” dialogue but Star Wars has always been that way.

Here’s one of my favourite videos that addresses his approach to dialogue:

https://youtu.be/S5E-eSdRjXs

There’s so much visual imagination in his films but not without layers. Mustafar symbolises Hell and Coruscant grows more and more commercial as the story goes along to show the decline of society to name but two examples.

There’s a reason Star Wars connects to so many different people and I think it’s because in part how imaginative it is in blending together so many art forms and cultural heritages together.

Post
#1435737
Topic
Most Powerful Quote in all the Star Wars films.
Time

“You and the Naboo form a symbiont circle. What happens to one of you will affect the other. You must understand this.”

I think it’s one of the most often overlooked bits of dialogue as it greatly illustrates how we can’t live without one another and that we’re doomed to fail if we don’t find common ground. I’m not sure it’s the most powerful but it’s definitely one of the most impactful and meaningful.

Post
#1435601
Topic
The <strong>Original Trilogy</strong> Radical Redux Ideas Thread
Time

act on instinct said:

Anakin Starkiller said:

but as is it would mess with the pace and tension release too much

You mean provide a welcome break from the snail’s pace of the Tatooine section?

Maybe for everyone who is used to Star Wars that’s how Tatooine feels, as a kid I loved the mystery of the barren planet with the droids before meeting Luke. And yes if there was an exciting chase through a tight winding cavern in the beginning of the movie it would cause diminishing returns by the end of the movie, the sequence the entire story is building up to.

I completely agree. I still love the down time with them for the reasons that it also is very much all visual storytelling and a good quieter part of the narrative after a strong action set piece on the Tantive IV. It gives us some time to process what we’ve seen so far before the story starts picking up again when we meet Luke. You need those quieter moments to contrast the bigger ones to get to know your characters. That’s partly why I think the down time in The Phantom Menace is so critical before the podrace. It gives us a chance to get to know Anakin as a person before he does something extraordinary.

Post
#1435595
Topic
General Star Wars <strong>Random Thoughts</strong> Thread
Time

screams in the void said:

Stardust1138 said:

screams in the void said:

^ This current discussion reminds me of the whole " Ring Theory " that was going on a few years back , I gotta go with HelloGreedo on his take on it here…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FGBGcvWkdM

To which I rebuke with this video essay by Rick Worley. He shares quotes from George that back things up that show the Ring Theory is true. It’s definitely intentional as you can even see it in The Clone Wars.

https://youtu.be/vqnjzVX8EKA

Here’s also a shorter video that addresses the idea.

https://youtu.be/Btp1BoGbuiM

Even Disney Star Wars does it. Albeit without understanding context a lot of the time and deliberate copy and paste.

https://youtu.be/Lrr1-T4Z_Wo

^ In regards to the first video you linked to , cherry picking and subjective editing and commentary do not prove something to be true and the maker of that video is analogous to those he points to who are doing the same thing .

In regards to the second video , a great deal of those story points in Empire are a greatly attributable to screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan ,who also was a screenwriter on The Force Awakens …I think he understood context just fine . The video also points to Terminator 2 as an example of ring theory ,which HelloGreedo mentions that a ton of other films do and that it’s not hard to spot these things if you are looking for them .

In regards to the third video…of course their are parallels ,as HelloGreedo mentions that a ton of other films do and that it’s not hard to spot these things if you are looking for them, even The Legends EU did these things like closed loops and circular narratives ,as does Star Wars under Disney , which Those Rebels clips in the video are a part of .

All this said , there are things that I like about All of the Star Wars films and things I don’t which is a whole other topic on its own

I respectfully disagree in part with what you’re saying as George discusses it in greater detail than just what was covered in the video. He discusses it in the commentary of The Phantom Menace. He calls it “visual jazz” and in the commentary of Attack of the Clones addresses how characters start saying the same things with similar ambitions. Notably Anakin and Dooku. For that matter he addresses these things in the commentary of each of his films as he’s been exploring these ideas since his early days when working on THX 1138 and American Graffiti. There’s too many examples to consider them to be coincidence. Some of the most notable examples within Star Wars are how the Jedi Temple arrival in The Phantom Menace syncs at the same time with its burning in Revenge of the Sith. The Podrace and the Speeder Bike Chase in Return of the Jedi sync and begin at the same time. The explosions happen at the same time. The framing and camera work. It all aligns together. There’s also Obi-Wan telling Luke he needs his help in A New Hope while it’s mere second synchronised with Palpatine saying the same thing to Anakin. The level of detail he went to with paralleling father and son’s story is definitely there in layers through narrative structure and. strong visual imagery. Sometimes they happen with the same character in different ways like Anakin’s choice when he succumbed to the Dark Side versus when he found the Light Side again when facing a similar choice. Narratively and visually it’s the same idea played differently but the same common principle but a different choice being made. There’s a great misunderstanding that poetry means copying but the images and narrative have to differ in some way for it to work effectively. This is why Rey doesn’t work entirely because they gave her so many responsibilities within the narrative that they didn’t think of the context.

I do think things are subjective but at the same time I do think sometimes people analysis films from the prospective of what they want them to be versus what the author intended. That’s not to say Red Letter Media or whomever can’t have an opinion as we all have one but trying to understand what the author intended versus spitballing without proper claims is not always right, especially when so many of the perceived problems of the Prequels are addressed within the narrative. It’s all to say that if you let go of what you want something to be you may find an understanding of what the author intended and see the underlying subtly versus your notions of what it is. There’s rules for a reason within filmmaking of this scale but that’s not to say they’re not meant to be breakable if done right.

The thing with The Empire Strikes Back is George had the narrative and majority of the plot outlined. He came up with the large bulk of the ideas for it. Lawrence Kasdan mostly touched up the dialogue, notably with Yoda. There’s this great misconception that George didn’t do much with Empire and that’s why it’s “the best of the best” but he really was heavily involved. It’s out of respect for Leigh Brackett that he’s not recognised more I think and in turn Lawrence Kasdan received such a cult status. I highly recommend Jonathan Rinzler’s book.

We’ll have to disagree about The Force Awakens. I think it copies without understanding context more than anything. It’s too on the nose.

I’ve not seen Terminator. So I don’t think it’s fair to give my thoughts on that part of the video but it came after Star Wars. A lot of films may connect to some extent to it now but it wasn’t always that way. Star Wars is what pushed the mythology and importance of heroes back on the path of central importance within mainstream stories. Before that Hollywood in particular was going down a very gritty and dark path. That’s not to say there wasn’t stories that didn’t parallel or connect before it but it had fallen off in Hollywood. Star Wars has always had strong parallels. The Original Trilogy in its own way fits the structure of ring composition very well between the three films.

I think Rebels is the only Disney era content to truly get the context mostly right but it makes sense that it would as Dave Filoni learned from George. I can’t say for the other bits as I’ve read very little of the EU so far and with Disney’s films it’s all about context. I think they’re missing context most of the time. I think Rogue One and some of The Last Jedi are exceptions.

Absolutely. We all have different interpretations of what is and what isn’t Star Wars. That’s part of the charm of it. It brings different people together for different reasons but there’s a common ground in knowing we all love it but may differ in some ways. I may not fully think Disney has understood Star Wars but I can still find some enjoyment if I don’t think too much of it fitting into what George created. His six films and The Clone Wars will always be my favourites. I’ll always be grateful to him.

Post
#1435000
Topic
General Star Wars <strong>Random Thoughts</strong> Thread
Time

screams in the void said:

^ This current discussion reminds me of the whole " Ring Theory " that was going on a few years back , I gotta go with HelloGreedo on his take on it here…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FGBGcvWkdM

To which I rebuke with this video essay by Rick Worley. He shares quotes from George that back things up that show the Ring Theory is true. It’s definitely intentional as you can even see it in The Clone Wars.

https://youtu.be/vqnjzVX8EKA

Here’s also a shorter video that addresses the idea.

https://youtu.be/Btp1BoGbuiM

Even Disney Star Wars does it. Albeit without understanding context a lot of the time and deliberate copy and paste.

https://youtu.be/Lrr1-T4Z_Wo

Post
#1434860
Topic
General Star Wars <strong>Random Thoughts</strong> Thread
Time

NeverarGreat said:

I mean, their bodies are in completely different positions…

Here’s an example with Luke and Padme.

Anakin above is part of the reversal.

Images mirror and intersect with one another within the structure to reverse and intertwine. There’s a difference between copying, and visual and narrative poetry. They’re not necessarily mutually exclusive as they must differ in some way for the cycle to work.

This video is a good reference too:

https://youtu.be/k7ZW1gtCljs

Post
#1434850
Topic
General Star Wars <strong>Random Thoughts</strong> Thread
Time

Found this on Reddit:

“I noticed that the first face shot we get of both young & old Anakin before each version “dies”, mirrors one another down to the position of the eyes. Both stare up at their vanquisher.”

The sheer amount of attention to detail George went to within his six films is unparalleled.

Post
#1434823
Topic
Last movie seen
Time

The Clone Wars - Movie

I hadn’t seen it in years but I decided to buy it as I found a real good deal on it. It’s not nearly as bad as its reputation leads one to believe. I really enjoyed it and if I’m honest it’s the most fun I’ve had watching Star Wars in a long time. It’s not perfect as it’s a bit weirdly paced in the beginning and has a couple of weird aspects but once it gets going it’s a real treat and fun with some good wisdom sprinkled in. At the end of the day that’s all I could’ve asked for and it delivered.

I definitely want to watch the parts of the series I’ve not seen yet by continuing my quest in watching what is the last remaining stories George told in a galaxy far, far, away and beyond for that matter…

Post
#1434541
Topic
YouTube/Vimeo/etc. finds for Original Trilogy <strong>making-ofs, documentaries, promos</strong>, etc.
Time

Robert Watts - A Life in Film

https://youtu.be/9uRTQjUdEyg

from the Filmumentaries com YouTube channel (27 minutes long)

The Blurb: Back in July 2018 I got to spend an hour with legendary location manager and producer, Robert Watts. In this interview we talk about the origins of his film career and some of the highlights along the way.

This conversation goes beyond just his time working on the Original Trilogy but it felt relevant here comparably speaking to similar threads. Star Wars talk begins at the 4:24 mark.