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44rh1n

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5-Dec-2014
Last activity
22-Jul-2021
Posts
190

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Post
#1351765
Topic
Info: Guide for Working with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR
Time

oohteedee said:

It’s important that force 10bit when you do it. The default with ffmpeg is 8bit. That could be the issue you are having.

I bet that was it! Once I finished mine through FFmpeg, it looked perfect.

oohteedee said:

I never work direct with an x264 or x265 because it’s always very sluggish and it’ll often show the wrong frame when scrubbing back and forth. In ProRes every frame is a key frame so the frame displayed is always accurate.

I couldn’t agree more with this statement!

Post
#1351757
Topic
Info: Guide for Working with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR
Time

Harmy said:

Yeah. I converted it to ProRes and I’m getting the same artifacts there. Though I did the conversion in Adobe Media Encoder, so that might be the problem.

Alright Harmy! I think I’ve figred it out! My ProRes 4444 sample conversion just finished, so I threw it into Resolve and it looks great! No artifacts anymore (at least, nowhere near the same as the previous stills). My suspicion is that MPV with its on-the-fly tonemapping, as well as Media Encoder, aren’t processing it in the highest quality possible. Because the slow ProRes 4444 conversion done in FFmpeg looks amazing.

  1. Flat HDR

  1. Tonemapping Applied

  1. Tonemapping & 200% Saturation

  1. Quick Custom Grade

Or here is a link to the images as TIFFs, instead of the compressed JPG versions above.

As far as creating the ProRes file in FFmpeg goes, here are the settings I used:


Post
#1351734
Topic
Info: Guide for Working with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR
Time

I finally have a Star Wars 4K HDR copy now, so I’ll stress-test it on my end as soon as I get the chance, to see how it holds up. But from just glancing at oohteedee’s D+77 (sourced from the 4K HDR), his doesn’t have the artifacting. So there might be something in the workflow chain causing the artifacting to happen on your end.

https://i.imgur.com/o02DAv2.jpg

Have you tried converting to ProRes before applying any color adjustments? ProRes, for me, fixes loads of issues. I think because it’s a codec intended for intermmediate work (color grading, editing, etc.)

Post
#1351714
Topic
Info: Guide for Working with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR
Time

Harmy said:

I was wondering if you guys could help me out with the HDR stuff - I’m working in Premiere and I don’t have DaVinci studio.
I remuxed the mkv to mp4, as per the guide and when I import that into Premiere, I do get the flat-looking image but when I try to make any adjustments to it, it brings out some really awful color-artifacts.

In my guide I say to rewrap the mkv to mp4 in FFmpeg and then transcode to ProRes in Resolve Studio. But then oohteedee suggested that you can simply transcode straight to ProRes with FFmpeg and skip the mp4 step altogether. So that’s what I’d recommend, since it doesn’t require Resolve Studio! Then you’ll be able to pull the ProRes file into the free version of Resolve (or any other software). Working in ProRes will take up more storage space than the MP4, but it will run much faster and efficiently on your computer.

Post
#1344316
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

Dwalin said:

44rh1n said:

Luckily The Two Towers and The Return of the King aren’t affected, and the official Blu-rays of those films both look amazing.

Yet the editions of The Two Towers differ.

My extended Blu-rays of The Two Towers and The Return of the King perfectly match the original extended DVD releases. Maybe there’s an issue with other regions? But my US copies of both those films are perfect.

Post
#1344042
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

ChainsawAsh said:

FOTR wasn’t a complete DI, which is part of why the EE BR is so different compared to TTT and ROTK (which were complete DI’s). So at least some film would need to be scanned again for FOTR.

Shoot, you’re right. I had forgotten about that, but now that you mention it I’m recalling the color grading featurette from the Appendices, where I believe they said only about 70% went through digital intermediate. Well, however they source the inevitable 4K release, I just want it to look nice and be true to the original release’s grade.

Chewielewis said:

44rh1n said:
I’ve been wondering about this myself. Since LOTR is so VFX heavy, redoing visual effects in 4K is probably out of the realm of possibility. Honestly, I just hope it’s sourced from the original 2K DI, and upscaled. No monkey business, no green tint, no DNR, no artificial sharpening, no scanning of a print — just the original file that got rendered out as the master, before it got printed back onto film. That would be the best source IMO.

But yeah its practically impossible for this to happen. Consider the hardware and software the vfx pipeline was built on is long decommissioned. An enormous amount of effort for a very minimal upgrade in fidelity.

Yeah, I agree that there’s pretty much no chance they’ll remaster the VFX in 4K. It will almost certainly be an upscale. But I’m ok with that. A lot of people give the 4K UHD upscales of 2K films a lot of flak, but in my opinion (when done correctly) they are still a massive improvement over the 1080p Blu-rays. People fail to understand that, while 2K 2048x1152 seems like it’s not much higher of a resolution than 1920x1080, it’s actually about 300,000 more pixels. So I’d rather see those pixels preserved in an upscale than removed in a downsampled BD.

FrankB said:

May I ask from where the information comes (it was finished digitally as a 2K DI)?
By the way: Thanks for your work, 44rh1n!

Fellowship of the Ring was one of the first films to go through a DI (digital intermediate) process. And back then, pretty much all films were done in 2K. It wasn’t until 2004 with Spider-Man 2 that a film had a 4K DI – and even then, it was super rare to finish a film in 4K. Even nowadays, probably half the major films are still mastered in 2K. We have a ton more being delivered in 4K now, which is awesome, but there’s still quite a lot done in good’ol 2K.

Post
#1343267
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

Harmy said:

I’m wondering what the UHD LOTR will be sourced from. While it was shot on 35mm,it was finished digitally as a 2K DI,so going back to film would mean redoing the entire post production and believe me, it would not be as simple as rerendering CGI in 4K - even if they still had all the assets and project files, which is ridiculously unlikely, CGI is rendered in layers, so the compositing would have to be redone as well - basically it would take pretty much the full cost of doing post production on a very high budget movie,so more than likely, they will go to the original 2K DIs, upscale them and give them an HDR grade.

I’ve been wondering about this myself. Since LOTR is so VFX heavy, redoing visual effects in 4K is probably out of the realm of possibility. Honestly, I just hope it’s sourced from the original 2K DI, and upscaled. No monkey business, no green tint, no DNR, no artificial sharpening, no scanning of a print — just the original file that got rendered out as the master, before it got printed back onto film. That would be the best source IMO.

Then again, Warner may be trying to capitalize off of the new Amazon series, so maybe they will release it later and do a full 4K remaster. It’s hard to say. That would be a very Peter Jackson-y thing to do.

All I want is for the film to look exactly like it looks on the EE DVD, but at the highest resolution and bitrate available.

Post
#1343209
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

Nick66 said:

44rh1n said:

Maybe I’ll go revisit some select scenes for a newer release, but I’m holding out hope that the new official 4K version coming this June will finally be a good version.

Are you sure about this? I think this was just a rumour, and that we’d have heard something by now if this was coming next month. My guess is that they’ll wait until the 20th anniversary of FOTR next year to put this out.

It has not been confirmed by Warner Bros. yet, so yes, it’s still a rumor. But the site that first reported about it has been reliable with their information in the past. Although, the world is kind of shut down, so I wouldn’t be surprised if it gets delayed. Fingers crossed though! Hoping it comes out soon.

Post
#1342641
Topic
Harmy's STAR WARS Despecialized Edition HD - V2.7 - MKV (Released)
Time

Danfun128 said:

This might have already been answered, but what exactly are power windows? It seems impossible to find the definition in this context on google.

Power windows are custom shapes drawn during the color grade to brighten or darken specifics areas a frame. They’re used for brightening faces, relighting scenes, focusing on specific areas of a frame, doing selective sharpening, etc. Every modern movie has thousands of them. And most modern restorations of old films have them too.

Some of us on this forum believe a pure restoration shouldn’t have power windows. Others see them as non-issues, because if an official theatrical restoration were released by Disney, it would certainly have them.

Just two different points of view, both worth discussing. I’m of the view that it’s good to have both — a proper preservation and a modern restoration.

Here is a great overview of power windows: https://youtu.be/pbvLZavPDvw

And if you’re interested in seeing power windows in practice on a real Oscar-winning film, feel free to check out this demo from Steven J. Scott. He graded The Revenant, Birdman, Gravity, Roma, Children of Men, as well as most of the highest profile Marvel Studios films including Avengers Endgame. This is him breaking down a few scenes from The Revenant. The demonstration begins at about 17:35. https://youtu.be/85lVPc0eAM0

Post
#1342435
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

Harmy said:

Thanks. I’ll check it out!

No problem! It seems a little strange at first because you actually add sharpening before you’re able to soften those edges. But once you play around with it a bit I think you’ll understand it. It takes a bit of dialing in. And it’s really easy to take things too far, so just be careful and be sure to use it tastefully. I’ve found that if I bring the Blur Radius all the way down to 0 (basically sharpening it 100%), and then adjusting the Mix to bout 44-45, then that’s where it starts to clean up those oversharpened edges really nicely.

Post
#1341753
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

Harmy said:

Could you tell me a bit more about the method you used to minimize the over-sharpening? The Star Wars UHD could certainly benefit from that too.

Yeah, sure thing! So in DaVinci Resolve, there’s an effect called “Mist,” which is available as part of the Blur/Sharpen palette. Essentially, what it does is blur the edges of a shot without blurring it globally. So if you dial in the right settings, it essentially can blur the areas of a shot that have been oversharpened / given the “edge enhancement” treatment. This video does a pretty good job overviewing the entire Blur/Sharpen palette, and she starts going over the “Mist” section at about 3:46 - https://youtu.be/YQTGk3K6pCM. And here’s another video that does a pretty good job explaining the Blur/Sharpen palette too. He goes over the “Mist” section at about 4:18 - https://youtu.be/MQN-yg7Qhdg. Hope that helps!

Post
#1341498
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

Harmy said:

This makes me so happy - I was going to do this in the same way - use theatrical Blu-Ray and only fill in EE shots from the EE BD with EE DVD chroma overlayed - I even started working on it but never could find the time to finish it, so I’m really glad someone has done this and even went above and beyond.

The only thing I probably would have done differently would be to replace some of the worst looking scenes in the theatrical with CCd EE - the theatrical BD looks really nice 95% of the time but there are a couple of scenes where the DNR was applied much heavier than the rest (off the top of my head, it was the scenes where Gandalf talks to Bilbo and then Frodo inside Bag End and then Gandalf’s confrontation with Saruman). Since they are theatrical scenes, the theatrical BDs chroma could be overlayed for those instead of the DVD. Might be something to think about for the next version. But even as it is now, it’s far better than anything we have from official sources 😃

Thanks for the kind words, Harmy! And I 100% agree about those scenes from the theatrical BD. Yes, you’re absolutely correct about Gandalf’s first discussion with Bilbo at the beginning of the film, as well as the fight with Saruman. Those are indeed some of the worst looking scenes in the theatrical BD. I had actually started working on the Sarumon scene for a bit, but got pretty burnt out because of how many cuts there are in that scene. So I decided to just go ahead and put out the v1.0 release with the theatrical footage. The framing of the theatrical BD is also quite different from the extended BD, so overlaying the chroma results in the shots needing a bit of cropping – so I was ultimately only satisfied with doing a full regrade on those scenes. So I decided it was too much work for the time being.

Maybe I’ll go revisit some select scenes for a newer release, but I’m holding out hope that the new official 4K version coming this June will finally be a good version. If it ends up sucking though, then I think I’ll for sure put out a v2.0 release polishing up some of those worst theatrical scenes, and adding some additional languages that some kind forum users have sent me. Oddly, the theatrical version of the film that’s on Netflix doesn’t suffer from DNR that’s on the BD release, and all those problem scenes actually look great; however, I’ve never been able to find a WEB-DL that’s high enough bitrate to be useful in my restoration. The version that streams at full quality on Netflix looks great, but all the WEB-DLs are too compressed. Any thoughts for how to source from a streaming site?

There are also a handful of other small problems I’d like to address eventually, such as the Elvish subtitles that are positioned slightly differently in the theatrical BD vs. the extended BD (now you’ll never unsee it). In this v1.0 release I figured those were non-issues, but I’d like them fixed eventually.

Thanks for your thoughts!

Post
#1341467
Topic
Info: Guide for Working with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR
Time

oohteedee said:

I do it a bit different.
After ripping and remuxing to a mkv, I use ffmpeg to convert the x265 .mkv to ProRes4444.
In Resolve I’ll then typically use a tonemapping LUT I created with DisplayCAL or another tonemapping LUT.
And finally still in Resolve I’ll do my final grade/edit.

Nice! That sounds like it would work really well too. Similar ideas. I like the idea of skipping a step and just going straight to ProRes in FFmpeg; however, I haven’t done that myself because FFmpeg’s ProRes implementation is unlicensed, and I’ve actually noticed a slight color shift with it. Maybe the issues have been fixed since I played around with it a couple of years back, and if so that would be awesome. That’s also a great way to get it into ProRes if you’re on Windows! Great thinking!

Post
#1341002
Topic
Harmy's STAR WARS Despecialized Edition HD - V2.7 - MKV (Released)
Time

CHEWBAKAspelledwrong said:

Another thing is adding print grain, given the mission, would be excessive, since the best Blus today come from OCNs and therefore have relatively fine grain fields.

Maybe the way to go would be to try to replicate the grain field from a quality Blu of a film from the same era shot on similar stock.

Another option would be to analyze the grain patterns from the prints and then use a grain generator plugin, such as the one built into Resolve, to perfectly replicate it. It technically wouldn’t be “real” scanned grain, but the end result would likely be a closer approximation to the print than just hoping to find a grain sample that happens to be a perfect match.

Some purists might not like this idea, but this is a technique used in very high end restoration. IMO, the look of the end result is what matters most.

And FWIW, that’s how I got the grain to look perfect in my Fellowship of the Ring Extended color restoration.

Post
#1340985
Topic
Harmy's STAR WARS Despecialized Edition HD - V2.7 - MKV (Released)
Time

Harmy said:

So, if someone could help me with the proper HDR workflow, it would be appreciated. I don’t even really want to make the final result 4K HDR - I’d like the result to be a regular BD, as I feel like this way the sources will match better and there shouldn’t be a significant loss in quality anyway but would like to source the HDR BDs to use the better dynamic range for color-grading.

bttfbrasilfan said:

44rh1n said:

Hey Harmy, thanks for the update. Love your work. Here are my two cents. You’ll definitely be able to do more with the new UHD rips than the new HD rips, because of the wide color gamut and 10-bit color. Even if your final delivery is in SDR, having the HDR version as a source will give you more details to pull from, especially in the shadows. Essentially, you can use it the same way you’d use Log camera footage. It will need to be graded though, otherwise it will look very flat. The other alternative would be to use the UHD source tonemapped to SDR, but in my opinion a tonemapped version would serve as an inferior source because you wouldn’t have that wide color gamut to work with anymore.

You can bring HDR footage into DaVinci Resolve and export it as ProRes (or TIFF/EXR/DPX, although those are overkill IMO), without tonemapping, and then that would serve as your best source for creating an SDR restoration with a custom grade. Resolve doesn’t handle MKV-wrappped files though, so you’d first need to rewrap an HEVC MKV remux to HEVC MP4 with ffmpeg (I recommend the GUI called Hybrid). I’d be happy to walk you through how to do any of this if you’d like. (Or I could do it myself and send the files to you, if someone can provide the BD UHD remuxes).

Just feel free to DM me if you want me to walk you through anything! Working with HDR footage is pretty simple once you wrap your head around it. 😃

Could you, please, make a tutorial on how to grade and export(in SDR) HDR Blu-rays or general video/media files in Resolve? Or at least point the way?

Hey Harmy, oohteedee, bttfbrasilfan, Chewielewis, and anyone else who’s interested – I just published my guide for how to work with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR. Hope it helps. https://originaltrilogy.com/post/id/1340983/action/topic#1340983

Post
#1340983
Topic
Info: Guide for Working with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR
Time

Guide for Working with 4K HDR Blu-ray Rips in SDR

HDR footage is nothing new. We’ve been using it for well over a decade in SDR workflows, despite HDR delivery being relatively new. Think of Arri Log C, RED RWG/Log3G10, Sony S-log, or Panasonic V-log. These are all HDR color spaces that we’ve been grading inside of SDR environments for a very long time. So treating the HDR footage from a UHD disc is a very similar process. Here’s how to get your UHD Blu-ray discs to a point where you can properly add custom grades to them.

•Create a remux from your UHD disc, using MakeMKV. This will copy the entire HDR film into an MKV wrapper without transcoding. (There are lots of guides for this online already, so I won’t go through that here).

In my example, I’m using a 4K HDR remux of X-Men: Apocalypse (Sorry, I haven’t bought my Star Wars OT in 4K yet).

If you have DaVinci Resolve Studio (the paid version of Resolve), keep reading. But if you only have the free version of DaVinci Resolve (the non-studio version), skip down to the “UPDATE 06/03/2020” section below.

•Use Hybrid (FFmpeg GUI) to rewrap the MKV file to MP4 (Not transcode. We want to preserve the original HEVC file). The reason we need our 4K HDR HEVC file to exist within an MP4 wrapper is so DaVinci Resolve can import it. To do this, set your Video setting in Hybrid to “passthrough” and ensure the container is set to “mp4.” Audio can be set to “ignore,” since we don’t need audio for this. Once you’re done, set your output folder and file name, and add it to the queue.

•In Hybrid, go to the “Jobs” tab, and hit the “Start” button to start processing your queue.

Once it’s done, you will have your original HEVC file, now as an MP4.

•Import the MP4 HEVC file into DaVinci Resolve Studio’s media pool, on the Media page. (Note: the free version of Resolve does not support importing HDR HEVC files, so this must be done in Resolve Studio. If you only have access to the free version, don’t worry! Skip down to the the “UPDATE 06/03/2020” section below)

•Ensure that the Resolve color management settings are set to the default: DaVinci YRGB, with timeline color space set to Rec. 709 Gamma 2.4.

•Make sure your project resolution and framerate are set to 4K UHD (3840x2160), 23.976fps.

•On the Edit page, pull the new MP4 file into a new timeline. It will look flat and ugly, with a slight green shift. This is what we want. We don’t want a tonemapped version. We want this log, flat, ugly version. This means it’s the HDR source. (Also, please note that the file will be a bit sluggish in Resolve because HEVC is a high-compression delivery codec and not really intended for editing/grading).

•On the delivery page, prepare a ProRes 422 HQ export of the film, in full resolution 3840x2160. (You may use ProRes 4444 if preferred, although it will use more storage space. ProRes 422 HQ is still 10bit, so it should suffice and save you a bit of storage). Once you’ve prepared the ProRes export, set an output location and add it to the render queue. Then on the render queue, hit “Start Render.”

This will give you the full 10-bit, wide gamut footage, without any of the HDR metadata. And since it’s ProRes (an intermediate codec intended for editing and grading), it will run much faster and be much less taxing on your CPU/GPU than the original HEVC version. The file size will be relatively large — approximately 220 GB / hour. You may think this is excessive, but that’s the price you have to pay to use proper intermediate codecs! (Using proper codecs will save you much time and frustration).

Note: If you’re on a Windows PC then you unfortunately won’t have the ProRes encoding options. You may use DNxHR HQX instead. It’s a fine alternative to ProRes HQ, although it is a bit more sluggish. Or you may also use any of your preferred image sequence formats: EXR, DPX, TIFF, etc. (although, in my opinion, those produce unnecessarily large file sizes, especially for footage sourced from HEVC).


UPDATE 06/03/2020 - If you only have the free version of DaVinci Resolve and not the paid Studio version, then you can convert to ProRes straight inside of FFmpeg (or the Hybrid FFmpeg GUI). Afterwards, you may follow the rest of this guide using the free version of Resolve. Below are some settings you can use in Hybrid. Or forum user oohteedee has kindly provided the command line for this in the comments below, if you prefer command line).


Once your ProRes export is complete, you now have your film ready to be graded and used in your fan restoration! This new ProRes clip is what you will now import into Resolve (or any other software) and use from now on.

The next step is knowing how to use this HDR footage and make it look pretty. Here’s one simple way to get a starting point in your color grade, using a Color Space Transform (CST) node in Resolve:

•Open your OpenFX palette and drag the “Color Space Transform” effect onto a new node.

•Set the Input Color Space to Rec.2020 and the Input Gamma to ST2084.
•Set the Output Color Space to Rec.709 and the Output Gamma to Gamma 2.4.
•Change Tone Mapping Method to Luminance Mapping, and Gamut Mapping to Saturation Mapping.

Now we have properly converted the color space from Rec.2020 to Rec.709, with tone mapping. This won’t look perfect, because every film is graded differently. It’s simply a color space conversion. But you’re now in the correct color space for SDR, and it should provide you with a really great starting point. You may add a node before or after the CST node, and tweak it to taste, using Lift/Gamma/Gain, YRGB Curves, and Contrast/Pivot/Hue/Saturation.

In my case, I added a node before the CST, and brought down the gamma/midtones as well as brought the temperature slightly cooler, and now it feels a bit more balanced.

If Resolve isn’t your preferred grading application, you may export your custom CST/grade as a Lookup Table (LUT) and bring it into any other software to use as a starting point for your grading. Here’s how:

•Right-click on a clip that has your CST/grade applied to it.
•Click “Generate 3D LUT (33 Point Cube).”
•Choose a directory where you want to export the LUT.

You can now use the .cube LUT file in any supported application.

You don’t need to grade the HDR footage with a CST like this; it’s just one way to get a quick starting point. You can do 100% custom grading on your HDR footage instead, if preferred. But I think this is a quick and effective way to get in the right ballpark.

I went ahead and created a LUT out of this, in case anyone wants it for their non-Resolve software applications. Just note that, in terms of grading hierarchy, you’ll want to make any large color adjustments in a layer/node before the LUT. There are two flavors of the LUT – one with just the default CST, and one with the CST + a few custom adjustments. Feel free to download them here.

And that’s it. Hope this helps.

-44

Post
#1340927
Topic
Harmy's STAR WARS Despecialized Edition HD - V2.7 - MKV (Released)
Time

NeverarGreat said:

Harmy said:

I am now in contact with oohteedee and we’re talking about collaborating on v3.0 using his D+xy versions as a basis and despecializing them further.

I have said before that now that we have 4K77 and 4K83 as 100% true theatrical preservstions (with 4K80 hopefully coming soon) the focus of Despecialized can shift to being what a modern transfer of the movie, if the SE never existed, could be. This is why I don’t think power-windows, not 100% theatrically accurate grading or redone wipes and such are really a problem.

Color grading and recomposited wipes are a given for a modern transfer based on the original negatives, but power windows to differentiate foreground/background elements for 3D feels noticeably different, at least based on none’s comparisons.

I wouldn’t be too torn up if they appeared in 3.0, but it seems a shame. Is there any idea how many of these power windows exist in the OT?

If Disney ever put out a “restoration” of the theatrical versions, it would have a polished color grade, including power windows. That’s standard for new 4K remasters of old films. So if Harmy can at least put out a theatrical version that’s of the same caliber to what a studio would put out, then that’s pretty great. I believe that’s all Harmy is trying to say here.

And then I think he’s also saying that if you’re looking for a true theatrical experience, with all the analogue “issues” that come with that, then the 4K77 version is what he recommends.

Basically, it seems like the 4K77 scans have sort of replaced the despecialized editions in terms of mimicking the original 1977 theatrical experience, whereas despecialized has pivoted towards having a clean, modern transfer of the theatrical cuts. And I think that’s pretty cool. It’s great to have both options.

Post
#1340755
Topic
Harmy's STAR WARS Despecialized Edition HD - V2.7 - MKV (Released)
Time

Dek Rollins said:

Is it wise to use the UHD as the primary source for Despecialized, considering the use of Power Windows?

In my opinion it’s a non-issue. The UHD is still the cleanest source (even though it’s DNR’d) and Power Windows can easily be undone in the grade, if necessary. The 2011 Blu-ray had Power Windows in the grade too.

Post
#1340357
Topic
Harmy's STAR WARS Despecialized Edition HD - V2.7 - MKV (Released)
Time

Hey Harmy, thanks for the update. Love your work. Here are my two cents. You’ll definitely be able to do more with the new UHD rips than the new HD rips, because of the wide color gamut and 10-bit color. Even if your final delivery is in SDR, having the HDR version as a source will give you more details to pull from, especially in the shadows. Essentially, you can use it the same way you’d use Log camera footage. It will need to be graded though, otherwise it will look very flat. The other alternative would be to use the UHD source tonemapped to SDR, but in my opinion a tonemapped version would serve as an inferior source because you wouldn’t have that wide color gamut to work with anymore.

You can bring HDR footage into DaVinci Resolve and export it as ProRes (or TIFF/EXR/DPX, although those are overkill IMO), without tonemapping, and then that would serve as your best source for creating an SDR restoration with a custom grade. Resolve doesn’t handle MKV-wrappped files though, so you’d first need to rewrap an HEVC MKV remux to HEVC MP4 with ffmpeg (I recommend the GUI called Hybrid). I’d be happy to walk you through how to do any of this if you’d like. (Or I could do it myself and send the files to you, if someone can provide the BD UHD remuxes).

Just feel free to DM me if you want me to walk you through anything! Working with HDR footage is pretty simple once you wrap your head around it. 😃

Post
#1338347
Topic
44rh1n's "The Fellowship of the Ring" Extended Edition Color Restoration (Released)
Time

Plum said:

44rh1n said:
Right now the versions on Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, Movies Anywhere, etc. are from the same master as the Blu-ray. So they all have the same color issues. Hopefully when the 4K version comes out later this year (fingers crossed it’s still happening this Summer!), they restore the colors to their proper hues. Hopefully. And if that’s the case, the Digital HD versions will likely get upgraded as well. But yeah, right now they all have the gross green color grade. The theatrical version has the original, beautiful color grade across all streaming services though, as does the extended edition on DVD.

Thanks. Shame that there isn’t a official ‘definitive’ options for the Extended Editions right now. They’re classics and people deserve to be able to see them in their best light.

Luckily The Two Towers and The Return of the King aren’t affected, and the official Blu-rays of those films both look amazing. So this restoration of Fellowship should more or less fill the gap.