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The Kenobi Movie Show (Spoilers) — Page 51

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To be honest, the various canon problems introduced by this show are the LEAST problematic aspect of the show for me. I’ve had to continuously “readjust” my understanding of Star Wars since 1999.

So now we learn Obi-Wan had this whole adventure with little 10-year-old Leia, which CLEARLY is not what you would infer from Leia’s holographic message in A New Hope. But then, in 1999 I also learned that Darth Vader created C3PO - which… doesn’t exactly contradict anything, but… like, really?

Now we know that when Obi-Wan says “Obi-Wan Kenobi? That’s a name I haven’t heard in a long time… a long time”, he means like 9 years. 9 years ago was 2013. That’s barely even yesterday, especially as you get older and time subjectively seems to move faster.

But on the other hand, after watching the Prequels, I learned that “a long time… a long time” actually just means around 19 years. Kenobi also says he hasn’t heard the name “Obi Wan” since before Luke was born, which is outright contradicted by Revenge of the Sith. Furthermore, 19 years ago was 2003. That’s certainly a “while” ago, I guess. For someone under 30 that might seem like a really long time. But it’s not “a long time… a long time” from the perspective of an old man. I mean I’m not THAT old, but 2003 doesn’t feel so long ago to me. Anyone watching Alec Guinness deliver that line in A New Hope would likely come away thinking he meant “like 40 or more years ago, maybe even centuries ago? (who knows how long these magical Jedi space Wizards can live anyway?)”

The point is, I’m so used to my natural understanding of the OT being forced to adjust or contort to fit later installments, to the extent that trying to maintain a consistent “canon” seems absurd. The only way is to be selective and maintain a personal head canon.

That said, I’m not trying to defend the Kenobi show. I think it’s tragically mediocre. But the ways it screws up canon is really the LEAST of its problems.

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I agree with the negative comments in one way. This was most definitely a movie expanded into a series. The whole bit on the desolate farming planet could be cut and just go directly to the second escape where Vader shows up. But as a 6 part series, it is really good. Nicely paced and planned out, unlike Book of Boba Fett.

I find I agree with one of the comments above. Anytime an OT character shows up in something, it is either a cause for rejoicing or derision. And it seems to be tied to expectations. Those are very individual so I really can’t make any blanket comments except that when the use of an OT character leads to derision of the project, it is always because expectations for that character(s) were not met. People more willing to accept what the story has to offer tend to like these new offerings.

Remember, many on this forum do not agree about the PT or ST films. Some rank TLJ as one of the worst films and some one of the best. Some hate the PT, some don’t. So any expectation that your opinion should be universal is unrealistic.

I think the bar is lower for TV than for film. Though to be very honest, I saw nothing wrong with how this series did things. Upping the brightness to indicate heat is common, even in films. In ANH, Tatooine is rather washed out, same with TPM and AOTC. I found it refreshing that the settings were not always dramatic. Things were happening in out of the way places because these force sensitive people and those helping them are sticking to the backwater places. So the two Vader/Kenobi encounters being in fairly blah locations is perfectly logical, even if that doesn’t fit with your ideas of the appropriate setting for such epic encounters.

I saw nothing about this that looks like a fan film. Though with the tools in the hands of fans these days, it is getting hard to tell them apart. ROTJ didn’t use any locations outside of CA. Redwoods close to Lucasfilm HQ and desert close to Hollywood. Star Wars has not always used exotic international locations. Alderaan was shown as a mountainous forested location in Ep III and the location shooting in Kenobi fit exactly. So I had no issue with a single location. they were all unique for Star Wars, even if they were mundane and terrestrial. But many Star Wars locations have been. Especially the OT ones. I’ve seen plenty of fan FX that rival studio FX. It is usually the acting that gives it away if anything, but a lot of fan films are fantastically done these days. So much so that accusing Kenobi of looking like a fan film is pretty meaningless.

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DrDre said:

yotsuya said:

MalaStrana#2 said:

yotsuya said:

MalaStrana#2 said:

Vader, episode 3: « I am what you made me. »

Vader, episode 6: « You didn’t fail Anakin. I killed Anakin. »

This fucking show isn’t even internally consistent. It’s incredible how badly written this shit is…

(Just waiting for basic fans to explain « he meant what he is in a physical state not his psychological state. It fits perfectly. It bridges PT to OT perfectly » 😂)

In episode 3 Vader is referring to his suit. In episode 6 he is referring to his fall. Two totally different topics.

Quoting myself:

« (Just waiting for basic fans to explain « he meant what he is in a physical state not his psychological state. It fits perfectly. It bridges PT to OT perfectly » 😂) »

You’re so predictable 😂

But accurate. In Episode 3, Kenobi has just encountered a man he thought dead and sees the suit he is now encased in. In Episode 6 they are talking about Anakin’s fall and Vader takes full credit for it. That you are calling this out as an issue shows you didn’t watch the episodes very carefully. So it really diminishes the weight of your other comments. If you aren’t paying attention to very obvious things, how can you properly judge this series at all.

No, that is retro-fitting the argument. There’s nothing in the statement “What have you become?”, that specifies whether Obi-Wan is specifically talking about Vader’s physical appearance. There’s nothing in that episode either, that suggests Vader is specifically referring to his appearance, when he states " I am, what you made me." Given the statements in the final episode, you might conclude retro-actively, that Vader was talking about his physical appearance. On the other hand given the many lapses of logic in the series, you might also conclude the writers created yet another inconsistency. There is no objectively correct answer here. Just an interpretation of what was said.

It is pretty clear that Kenobi is shocked by Vader’s appearance and that was the question asked and the one Vader answered. When he says “I am what you made me.” what else could he be referring to except the armor that now keeps him alive? Kenobi didn’t cause his fall to the dark side so that would make no sense. So the two conversations are about two different aspects of Vader, body vs. force.

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Heck, any fan with reasonable money can fake an anamorphic look (proper anamorphic, not just cropping to 2:39:1) and using 35mm film stock these days. There are anamorphic lenses and filters on the market, along with real 35mm grain plates in all the desired resolutions.

I’m more a fan of 16mm faking myself. If Kenobi had gone for a more fake-16mm look (including a 1:78:1 or 1:66:1 AR), it might’ve sold me a bit more on the cinematography and the rougher feeling.

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As for Leia, this series just emphasizes things we saw in the OT. How did she stand in front of Vader, get tortured by Vader, without her force abilities showing? She obviously has them, more obvious in this series, but even in the OT there are hints. So what do we make of these and do they agree or not?

First I would say they agree. For one thing, we don’t see Vader at full power in ANH. It was the first film and Lucas hadn’t worked that out yet. Vader probably wasn’t intended to use the Jedi mind trick on Leia to get her to talk. But not seeing the interrogation, we don’t know what he did or did not do. We only have what we can surmise from the rest of the OT. So whatever he does, he never realizes she is force sensitive or his daughter.

Second, young Leia has powers, but is not wise in their use yet. She can read people. She is powerful in the force, but not like Luke, Kenobi, or Yoda. Her power is subtle. A good power for a politician. It goes unnoticed until Kenobi tells Luke she is his sister. Like in ANH, Leia is around Vader and Reva and they don’t notice her power. This also ties in to explain the big plot hole in ROTJ vs. ROTS. Kenobi knew Padme. Leia reads his memories of Padme and gains what she tells Luke of in ROTJ. Padme was on his mind a lot, which seems to be what she can sense.

And most of all, this young Leia is very much an homage to Carrie Fisher. She is wild like Carrie and we see some character development as she learns the cost of being wild and the benefits of channeling her talents. At the end she dresses herself and is ready to do her duty for Alderaan. Much closer to the Leia we meet in ANH.

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Channel72 said:

To be honest, the various canon problems introduced by this show are the LEAST problematic aspect of the show for me. I’ve had to continuously “readjust” my understanding of Star Wars since 1999.

So now we learn Obi-Wan had this whole adventure with little 10-year-old Leia, which CLEARLY is not what you would infer from Leia’s holographic message in A New Hope. But then, in 1999 I also learned that Darth Vader created C3PO - which… doesn’t exactly contradict anything, but… like, really?

Now we know that when Obi-Wan says “Obi-Wan Kenobi? That’s a name I haven’t heard in a long time… a long time”, he means like 9 years. 9 years ago was 2013. That’s barely even yesterday, especially as you get older and time subjectively seems to move faster.

But on the other hand, after watching the Prequels, I learned that “a long time… a long time” actually just means around 19 years. Kenobi also says he hasn’t heard the name “Obi Wan” since before Luke was born, which is outright contradicted by Revenge of the Sith. Furthermore, 19 years ago was 2003. That’s certainly a “while” ago, I guess. For someone under 30 that might seem like a really long time. But it’s not “a long time… a long time” from the perspective of an old man. I mean I’m not THAT old, but 2003 doesn’t feel so long ago to me. Anyone watching Alec Guinness deliver that line in A New Hope would likely come away thinking he meant “like 40 or more years ago, maybe even centuries ago? (who knows how long these magical Jedi space Wizards can live anyway?)”

The point is, I’m so used to my natural understanding of the OT being forced to adjust or contort to fit later installments, to the extent that trying to maintain a consistent “canon” seems absurd. The only way is to be selective and maintain a personal head canon.

That said, I’m not trying to defend the Kenobi show. I think it’s tragically mediocre. But the ways it screws up canon is really the LEAST of its problems.

I would argue it does more damage than the prequels in that regard. Short of obvious flubs like Lucas forgetting that “a thousand years” and “a thousand generations” are two different things and stuff like Leia remembering her mother when RotS showed that the twins both had the exact same amount of time with her, there’s nothing that really changes or makes what comes after fundamentally unworkable. Things like Qui-Gon being Obi-Wan’s master rather than Yoda works just the same since Yoda trained all the Jedi and there’s no reason force ghost Kenobi would go into details while Luke is freezing to death on Hoth.

With this show though, you’re taking a film that has already been recontextualized out the wazoo by later films like RotJ and the prequels that it’s already packed to the brim with subtext dripping out of every line of dialogue. Adding more to that just stretches it beyond belief and stops creating substance and starts being incomprehensible.

Leia never mentioning or showing familiarity with Obi-Wan and now Luke showing unfamiliarity with lightsabers and never mentioning what happened to him as a child all comes off as unbelievable rather than plausible, even if he suffered amnesia or something after the fact, WE the audience know what happened and that little tidbit of info doesn’t actually add anything to the saga. Especially in something that is comparatively extended media compared to the film saga itself.

Couple that with a brand new character who is never mentioned in any other source being tied so intimately with each of the main characters and it reads like fanfiction. And maybe as a fanfiction it would be acceptable but a big budget Disney TV show that’s supposed to be ‘official’ canon? I’m sorry, no.

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As much as I loved the finale, now that I’ve had the time to look back on the whole series with hindsight, I agree with many out there that this should’ve been a movie instead. That said, I did like how each episode “emulated” a different saga film from Episode I-VI, and I’m pretty sure the finale also had a few sequel trilogy references sprinkled in for good measure too, which was cool. Not sure if any of that has been discussed here yet!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Budu1ux09Rs

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yotsuya said:

NeverarGreat said:

Omni said:

Guess now we know why Leia’s lightsaber resembles Obi-Wan’s and she named her son Ben 😃

Hey that’s a good connection!

RL, I was reminded of the GOT scene on Tatooine, it felt like I was listening to a Radio Drama because there was literally nothing visible on screen.

Also, another thing that baffled me was why Obi-wan thought his plan to divert Vader’s attention would work, and also why it did.

Like, Obi-wan knew that Vader had a personal shuttle with which to pursue him in alone, and also had the Grand Inquisitor with which to continue pursuit of the refugees. Yet Vader just diverts the entire Star Destroyer to follow Obi-wan and then just leaves it behind and says that he will now follow Obi-wan alone in his ship. Baffling.

Not really baffling. We see Vader do the exact same thing in TESB. He orders his whole fleet to pursue the Falcon into the asteroid field. And at that moment it is faster to have the Star Destroyer go after Kenobi rather than get in a shuttle or Tie fighter. Kenobi knows what motivated Anakin and Vader is even more obsessive. Until corrected by the Emperor.

The difference is that in ESB the Falcon is the only Rebel ship that hasn’t escaped into Hyperspace. Vader really only has one choice:

1: Find the Falcon at all costs and use it as bait for Luke.
2: Try to follow Luke’s X-wing despite not knowing where it went.

Obviously he will go for option 1.

In Kenobi Vader had at least five choices:

1: Send fighters to immediately disable the transport and/or close the distance in a shuttle and board the transport himself. Obi-wan’s plan fails before it begins.
2: Ignore Kenobi and continue pursuit of the transport. Obi-wan’s plan fails.
3: Send the Grand Inquisitor in the shuttle with some fighters to continue pursuit of the transport while Vader and his Destroyer follows Kenobi. Obi-wan’s plan fails.
4: Follow Kenobi in his shuttle with some fighters and allow the Destroyer to pursue the transport. Obi-wan’s plan fails.
5: Send everything against Kenobi and ignore the other high value targets on the transport, including Leia. Obi-wan’s plan succeeds.

Only a child without object permanence would choose option 5, especially since if they were really so obsessive and blinded by rage they would choose option 1 and win.

And this is only one of several instances where the show tries to show Vader as both an impulsive, unthinking rage monster hellbent on capturing Kenobi and also a character who is so disinterested in finishing the job that he sits back and lets Kenobi escape at least four times in six episodes.

I’m more than willing to engage with these stories on their own terms and have individual villains make sub-optimal decisions based on their established character traits, but if these traits become Flanderized to the point that two of the galaxy’s most powerful villains can’t capture a crippled freighter, don’t blame me for pointing out that their Star Destroyer has become a clown car.

You probably don’t recognize me because of the red arm.
Episode 9 Rewrite, The Starlight Project (Released!) and ANH Technicolor Project (Released!)

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NeverarGreat said:

yotsuya said:

NeverarGreat said:

Omni said:

Guess now we know why Leia’s lightsaber resembles Obi-Wan’s and she named her son Ben 😃

Hey that’s a good connection!

RL, I was reminded of the GOT scene on Tatooine, it felt like I was listening to a Radio Drama because there was literally nothing visible on screen.

Also, another thing that baffled me was why Obi-wan thought his plan to divert Vader’s attention would work, and also why it did.

Like, Obi-wan knew that Vader had a personal shuttle with which to pursue him in alone, and also had the Grand Inquisitor with which to continue pursuit of the refugees. Yet Vader just diverts the entire Star Destroyer to follow Obi-wan and then just leaves it behind and says that he will now follow Obi-wan alone in his ship. Baffling.

Not really baffling. We see Vader do the exact same thing in TESB. He orders his whole fleet to pursue the Falcon into the asteroid field. And at that moment it is faster to have the Star Destroyer go after Kenobi rather than get in a shuttle or Tie fighter. Kenobi knows what motivated Anakin and Vader is even more obsessive. Until corrected by the Emperor.

The difference is that in ESB the Falcon is the only Rebel ship that hasn’t escaped into Hyperspace. Vader really only has one choice:

1: Find the Falcon at all costs and use it as bait for Luke.
2: Try to follow Luke’s X-wing despite not knowing where it went.

Obviously he will go for option 1.

In Kenobi Vader had at least five choices:

1: Send fighters to immediately disable the transport and/or close the distance in a shuttle and board the transport himself. Obi-wan’s plan fails before it begins.
2: Ignore Kenobi and continue pursuit of the transport. Obi-wan’s plan fails.
3: Send the Grand Inquisitor in the shuttle with some fighters to continue pursuit of the transport while Vader and his Destroyer follows Kenobi. Obi-wan’s plan fails.
4: Follow Kenobi in his shuttle with some fighters and allow the Destroyer to pursue the transport. Obi-wan’s plan fails.
5: Send everything against Kenobi and ignore the other high value targets on the transport, including Leia. Obi-wan’s plan succeeds.

Only a child without object permanence would choose option 5, especially since if they were really so obsessive and blinded by rage they would choose option 1 and win.

And this is only one of several instances where the show tries to show Vader as both an impulsive, unthinking rage monster hellbent on capturing Kenobi and also a character who is so disinterested in finishing the job that he sits back and lets Kenobi escape at least four times in six episodes.

I’m more than willing to engage with these stories on their own terms and have individual villains make sub-optimal decisions based on their established character traits, but if these traits become Flanderized to the point that two of the galaxy’s most powerful villains can’t capture a crippled freighter, don’t blame me for pointing out that their Star Destroyer has become a clown car.

But Vader is a rage monster. That is what being a Sith is about. Vader burns with hate toward Kenobi and his actions fit with that assessment. Vader only cares about Kenobi. The inquisitors care about the others who are escaping, but Vader does not. It is clear from this entire series and from the scenes in ANH that Vader burns for revenge and will stop at nothing to get it. He doesn’t calm down until the Emperor tells him to. He’s ready to send the fleet after Kenobi and is told no by the only person he will listen to. So your argument that Vader must make some other choice isn’t in character for him. In the PT Anakin was portrayed as similarly single minded. He was ready to abandon the chase for Dooku to rescue Padme and wanted to take Kenobi and the clones as well.

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If he has seen/sees it, I’m guessing… he didn’t/wouldn’t like it very much. Plus, there wasn’t a lot of mention of him during the press tour, even when Hayden and Ewan were constantly talking about how reception to the PT has changed a lot, how they rewatched the PT and thought they were fine movies, etc.

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Weirdly I feel like George wouldn’t like this but he would dig a lot of aspects of Book of Boba Fett. I have no evidence of this, just vibes.

EDIT: Happy 1000th post to me.

“Remember, the Force will be with you. Always.”

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I’m sure George has seen it, or his friends telling him to watch it.

Yes, it’s not perfect, not by a long shot. There’s lots of errors and stuff I would have done differently.

There’s a lot of things I liked in this, but there’s also things that didn’t make sense.

I do miss the wipes, John Williams musical score, and a few common sense issues that the characters didn’t have.

Some of the background actors with speaking roles seemed liked they were just going through the motions and the script without showing any emotion on their faces whatsoever. Some were good, others just didn’t show anything. There was no urgency for a couple of actors I noticed.

Overall, I liked it, but it could have been better than what it was. It could have used at least one or two more rewrites before shooting started.

I can’t wait to see the fan edits of this.

I give it a 78% out of 100.

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timdiggerm said:

What on earth was going on with the spaceship movements? That was awful

Haha, to some it was “incredible and harkened to the opening of ANH …awesome poetry!”

And I just don’t get it. To me, there was no care brought to any aspect of the story and visuals. This should have been their chance of committing excellence to such a bold idea. I fear for the future of SW…people are praising this show up and down.

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Fan_edit_fan said:

timdiggerm said:

What on earth was going on with the spaceship movements? That was awful

Haha, to some it was “incredible and harkened to the opening of ANH …awesome poetry!”

And I just don’t get it. To me, there was no care brought to any aspect of the story and visuals. This should have been their chance of committing excellence to such a bold idea. I fear for the future of SW…people are praising this show up and down.

Yes, some are calling this duel one of the best in the saga, and while it certainly had a number of cool moments, I felt (like in episode 3 of the series) the duel had no rythm. There was something very chaotic in the way the lightsaber duels were shot.

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DrDre said:

Fan_edit_fan said:

timdiggerm said:

What on earth was going on with the spaceship movements? That was awful

Haha, to some it was “incredible and harkened to the opening of ANH …awesome poetry!”

And I just don’t get it. To me, there was no care brought to any aspect of the story and visuals. This should have been their chance of committing excellence to such a bold idea. I fear for the future of SW…people are praising this show up and down.

Yes, some are calling this duel one of the best in the saga, and while it certainly had a number of cool moments, I felt (like in episode 3 of the series) the duel had no rythm. There was something very chaotic in the way the lightsaber duels were shot.

I liked that duel, but “one of the best” is definitely pushing it. Without the conceit of Hayden and Ewan facing off again, it probably wouldn’t be regarded as very special. The aftermath may well be one of my favourite Star Wars moments, though - even if Rebels did the broken mask first.

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Well, the series certainly isn’t perfect. The predictability is one thing, as soon as the Grand Inquisitor made his cold comment to Reva, I knew they’d try to make her sympathetic and work her into things as not being so bad, blah blah, etc., but this is hollywood and Disney, so no surprise. As to continuity concerns, I can understand them, but the only thing that is true canon is the original trilogy (unaltered, of course). Ever since the prequels I take a rather lenient policy on continuity issues, as long as something doesn’t clearly contradict the original trilogy, I generally let it slide. When it comes to Star Wars, you have to know what to take and what to leave, what belongs and what’s revisionist nonsense, what fits with what Star Wars really is and was made to be when it was originally crafted and what doesn’t. Discerning fans who understand the source of the mythos and lore and what it represents understand the need to do this. So while I do prefer if the continuity is handled well in a series, I don’t worry about it too much; while always keeping in mind that the original trilogy is the gold standard on Star Wars, other sources being lesser.

I do think the confrontation between Obi-Wan and Vader was done quite well. I felt bad for Obi-Wan, Anakin was his best friend, and he was entrusted to train and prepare him, and the combination of his fall years earlier and now when he sees what has happened to him, well, that’s a very hard thing to deal with… And I will give Vader credit for essentially admitting to Obi-Wan that while his severe injuries were at Obi-Wan’s hands, his fall to the dark side took place just before the duel that led to those injuries. I think deep inside he sort of felt bad that Obi-Wan was taking 100% of the blame on himself, even if Vader wouldn’t openly admit it, in part due to his pride and arrogance. But imagine Anakin seeing with his own eyes the look on Obi-Wan’s face when Obi-Wan looks upon him in his current state, what has become of his close friend, that had to cut him deep…

The Star Wars trilogy. There can be only one.

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Lots of unrealistic expectations here.

It’s a modern TV series. That means generic entertainment/storyline and production values limited by time and cost-cutting. It’s not art, it’s a (more or less rushed) product for binge/consumption.

And it’s from Disney, meaning the focus is on a broad audience and merchandising. They specifically avoid complex themes and try to make things suitable for younger people (defusing tension through humor - Leia’s pursuit, redemption arcs - Reva, etc).

So it must be compared with other similar TV series, not with movies. For what it is, I think it’s really enjoyable.

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4throck said:

Lots of unrealistic expectations here.

It’s a modern TV series. That means generic entertainment/storyline and production values limited by time and cost-cutting. It’s not art, it’s a (more or less rushed) product for binge/consumption.

And it’s from Disney, meaning the focus is on a broad audience and merchandising. They specifically avoid complex themes and try to make things suitable for younger people (defusing tension through humor - Leia’s pursuit, redemption arcs - Reva, etc).

So it must be compared with other similar TV series, not with movies. For what it is, I think it’s really enjoyable.

So, it’s the viewer’s fault for expecting more than mediocrity. There have been plenty of great TV shows with high production values, but more importantly good writing. The entire reason for the existence of these shows is HBO pushing the envelope with series like The Sopranos, Rome, and GOT, while Netflix has also had its string of successes. Series like Cobra-Kai have shown, that you can elevate beloved and cheesy properties like Karate Kid without losing the essence of what it was about. Fans rightly expect more from series these days, because they’ve seen them done right, and not just fan service strung together by weak writing, and a distinct lack of actual story.

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4throck said:

Lots of unrealistic expectations here.

It’s a modern TV series. That means generic entertainment/storyline and production values limited by time and cost-cutting. It’s not art, it’s a (more or less rushed) product for binge/consumption.

My expectations for production value were set by Mandalorian. This series didn’t live up to that at all.

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Channel72 said:

I’ve had to continuously “readjust” my understanding of Star Wars since 1999.

Been at it myself since 1980. 😉

This is moving quickly, so I’m just perusing. I’ll deep dive later this evening. Hats off, by the way, at keeping things fairly civil.

originaltrilogy.com Moderator

Listen, it don’t really matter to me, baby.
You believe what you want to believe.

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Well, Sopranos, etc. were the old days. A modern (made in the last 2-3 years) streaming series has 10 episodes per season (or less), and production constraints are publicly acknowledged (usually blaming the pandemic or remote working). So I’ve adjusted expectations based on those clues, given by the production companies themselves.

But quality was going down before that (GOT is a good example). Even on Star Wars TV, the quality drop from Mandalorian season 1 to season 2 and BobaFet is obvious.

Indeed I’ve come to expect mediocrity, but can still enjoy a series as long as it isn’t boring or completely stupid. I simply don’t attach myself to any series as I do with a movie (where I do expect some quality).

(There’s no blame here - it’s fine if you don’t like it or if it doesn’t match your quality standards. These are just opinions, each person will have their own and they can change 😉 ).

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4throck said:

Well, Sopranos, etc. were the old days. A modern (made in the last 2-3 years) streaming series has 10 episodes per season (or less), and production constraints are publicly acknowledged (usually blaming the pandemic or remote working). So I’ve adjusted expectations based on those clues, given by the production companies themselves.

But quality was going down before that (GOT is a good example). Even on Star Wars TV, the quality drop from Mandalorian season 1 to season 2 and BobaFet is obvious.

Indeed I’ve come to expect mediocrity, but can still enjoy a series as long as it isn’t boring or completely stupid. I simply don’t attach myself to any series as I do with a movie (where I do expect some quality).

(There’s no blame here - it’s fine if you don’t like it or if it doesn’t match your quality standards. These are just opinions, each person will have their own and they can change 😉 ).

Fair enough! 😃