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Joel

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Join date
14-Sep-2004
Last activity
21-Nov-2020
Posts
208

Post History

Post
#1318432
Topic
4K77 - Released
Time

YRK01 said:

Do you guys reckon the bitrate is the reason my video is so choppy. Like I said earlier im playing it on a TV though a hard drive. I’m not that good with computers so any help would be much appreciated.

There are several factors that could be contributing - which version are you playing? You might try both versions to see if the constant bitrate one plays more consistently than the variable or vice versa…

Post
#1318402
Topic
4K77 - Released
Time

Tomas Stacewicz said:

My Panasonic Ultra HD Blu-ray player flags the metadata of 4K77 2160p v.1.0 as 23.976 fps. I cannot se any reason that the 1.4 is any different. But I will check it out soon.

Thanks - I know it shouldn’t be 60fps, just wondering why none of my Mac media players can tell me what the frame rate is. Interestingly, using Handbrake “same as source” to re-encode gave me a 23.97fps file, so mystery (probably?) solved, but it doesn’t explain why, for instance, when I try to create a new file with my own settings, it only offers me frame rates in the 30/60 frames world.

Anyway, 1.4 looks great!

Post
#1316253
Topic
Pickle2503's Attack of the Clones Theatrical Preservation(ish) (Released)
Time

I saw the 35mm print only once in the theater, and the digital twice. I had a question back then that I don’t really remember answering:

After the title crawl, the digital/home video version has an upward tilt through the starfield (the only one in the trilogy that does that)… does the Film/Centropy version move up as well, or does it move down?

Thanks kindly!

Post
#1302640
Topic
Help Wanted: NEED ISOLATED BITS AND PIECES of dialogue and sound effects sequences from A NEW HOPE
Time

I’m sure there’s a way to do this digitally, but…

One way to do it --in real time-- using hardware is to get a modern Surround Receiver or preamp with analogue outputs for each channel (The NAD T748II has these, for example). Make sure the receiver is playing back the DTS-Master Audio, play the blu ray and record the output of the center channel to whatever recording system you have. Though I haven’t done this specifically with Star Wars, I’ll still bet you’ll end up with a very high-quality recording with almost 100% dialogue, with a few center-panned sound effects popping in as well. Most modern movies have the music panned to some combination of the L, R, and surround channels.

Post
#1277910
Topic
Phantom Menace Trailer
Time

I don’t remember any trailer ending with Darth Maul’s second blade igniting.

I downloaded and saved all of the (US) online trailers from 1998-1999, but they’re on a hard drive at home and I won’t be able to get to them until the weekend. Will definitely check!

Obvious question: have you checked the TV spots from the DVD box set? I don’t remember if they’re the same as the “tone poem”/tv spots or if there are others.

Post
#1252098
Topic
Info: Star Wars - What is wrong and what is right... Goodbye Magenta
Time

poita said:

I have spoken to Mark Wileage who did the colour for the SE, and I have an almost unfaded Kodak print here, it isn’t very different at all to the Tech IB other than the slight green in the IB being absent.

Mark did color for the 2004 DVD release - I worked at Technicolor at the time and his description of the conditions and timeframe were pretty dismal and surprising. It’s amazing the DVDs look as good as they did - Did he do the SE as well?

Post
#1236876
Topic
Info: The Disney/Fox acquisition....
Time

According to Wikipedia, Williams re-recorded the fanfare for Empire Strikes Back and his version was used in the subsequent Lucas-helmed Star Wars movies.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20th_Century_Fox

Incidentally, it seems that the “slanted 0” 20th Century Fox logo originally designated Cinemascope as well. Do we know why that particular version of the logo was used in Empire Strikes Back but not SW or ROTJ?

Post
#1203824
Topic
Empire Strikes back 35mm restoration feedback thread (POUT) (a WIP)
Time

Unfortunately, none of the GUI solutions have worked on my 2017 mac, but as per GZK8000’s suggestion, I googled “Unrar” for command line (Terminal) and got the following two links that will walk you through it:

To get and install UNRAR:
http://best-mac-tips.com/2013/02/01/install-free-command-line-unrar-mac/

To unwrap the RAR files after installing UNRAR:
http://best-mac-tips.com/2013/02/02/extract-rar-archive-command-line-mac-terminal/

Meanwhile, this is beautiful! The reds are pretty intense (as was alluded to earlier in the thread), but it does kind of help Leia look healthier while visiting Luke in the sick bay.

The opening crawl looks a little soft to me. Is that just what it looks like? …And there is obviously some flicker.

Beyond that, what kind of things should I be looking for in order to actually be helpful in this process?

Post
#1203607
Topic
2016 High-Res Star Wars Soundtracks
Time

Well the good news is that it’s a very different sound from the 2016 hi-res copies I have. Very big, great size and weight.

I’ve only given it a casual and cursory listen, but the Empire stuff is a noticeably different presentation than previous releases, with lots of reverb. I’d love to know if it was added recently or if it was retrieved from the original multis (no liner notes come with the HDTracks download), but in any case, on first listen anyway, it sounds pretty great!

Post
#1203480
Topic
2016 High-Res Star Wars Soundtracks
Time

CHEWBAKAspelledwrong said:

PSA the '2016 hi-res soundtracks" are different from the 2018 remasters. The new SKUs that came out the other day are entirely new masters.

It seems like there’s a little confusion in here.

Well that’s interesting! And I’m glad, as the stuff I downloaded (again, possibly not the real deal) was definitely not a good-sounding issue. I guess I’ll pull the trigger at HDTracks and see.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2018/03/22/original-6-star-wars-soundtracks-being-remastered

Post
#1203418
Topic
2016 High-Res Star Wars Soundtracks
Time

GZK8000 said:

Again, you’re not understanding how Nyquist works.

https://manual.audacityteam.org/man/digital_audio.html
See the part about “sample rates” in the middle of the page.

Forgive me if I rely on my audio recording degree, 15 years as a recording engineer, and 30 years as an audio hobbyist over your ability to google something.

Nyquist stated that to reproduce a certain frequency, you need a sample rate of at least twice that frequency. This doesn’t mean that a higher sampling rate only gives you more high frequencies/more frequency response. It does allow for a wider frequency response, but the point of it is to capture more plot points to reconstruct the signal (as per the chart in the link above).

If you want to tell me more about what I don’t know, feel free to PM me here, but we can stop cluttering up this post with the technical discussion.

Post
#1203338
Topic
2016 High-Res Star Wars Soundtracks
Time

a_o said:

the new versions are on hdtracks and tidal. lapti nek is on the rotj album still. wonder why it’s not the ‘special edition’ 2-cd versions of the trilogy from 97/2004

i just got the 1993 4-disc cd set myself

Whoa! I’m glad I responded to this year-old thread - I had no idea they were back up on HDTracks - and actually affordably priced ($13.98 for the 192khz/24bit version)!

It’s a little strange to me that they’re still going with the original 70s album track listings. But I’m also worried that they’ll sound like the earlier set I got.

Meanwhile, the 1993 4-disc is my favorite!

GZK8000 said:
Sampling does not work as you’re describing it. The reconstruction filter reconstructs the original analog signal up to a certain time resolution, which is very high in Redbook audio. I also think the time resolution only depends on the amount of bits per sample, rather than the sampling rate, but I don’t remember where I read that.

It actually does work exactly as I’m describing it, unless I did a poor job above. A 20khz sine wave sampled at 44.1Khz gets exactly 2 samples to describe it. At 192Khz? it gets 8, or quadruples. But the bigger difference is in the dynamic range anyway. Meanwhile, frequency is a time-based phenomenon (cycles per second). The word length determines the bit depth, or dynamic range.

The “reconstruction filter” is just low pass-filter at the analog output. That’s catching the high-frequency spikes, or the “steps” between each sampled part of the wave, and is there to smooth out the rough edges caused by the reconstruction.

Anyway, the purpose of this thread was to ask about the hi-res versions. If you don’t believe that there are real benefits, I’ll refer you to the following website:
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5891db5329687fadaad172d7/t/59c0e856cd0f6804b6b43ed3/1521034351544/?format=1500w

Post
#1203201
Topic
2016 High-Res Star Wars Soundtracks
Time

Density said:

Just FYI, “high res audio” is a fraud, a marketing gimmick based on pseudoscience. It is not physically possible to hear frequencies that high. A standard CD already captures everything within human hearing range and then some, after you’ve reached the age you’re likely to care about audio quality your hearing won’t even be able to reach that, and the vast majority of music does not make use of anywhere near the dynamic range supposedly offered by this “higher resolution.” All it does is waste disk space. It’s useful only in studios for purely technical reasons, utterly useless for the end consumer.

Unfortunately, this is misinformed and based on misunderstandings about sound, among other things. There’s nothing “pseudo” about the science, it is what is. While it’s true that humans can’t hear fundamental tones above a certain threshold (20K if you’re a kid, for instance), high frequency response is only part of what’s happening with high res audio. I won’t go into a lengthy discussion about it, but, as an example if you are trying to recreate a waveform, the more plot points you have, the more accurate that waveform is going to be. Higher sample rate = more accurate waveform.

Secondly, all music is extremely dynamic, and while most popular music is compressed and doesn’t make use of 120+ db of dynamic range (nor would you want it to), dynamic range isn’t the entire point. It’s the fact that going from 16bit to 24 bit gives you way, way more info: 16 bit = 65,536 possible volume levels, and with every bit, that number doubles. So at 24 bit, we now have 16,777,216 different volume levels. Further, the digital noise present in every digital recording (the “noise floor”) is moved even further into the background.

Anyway, maybe you don’t/can’t hear the differences - and I believe you absolutely could hear them given the right playback system - but that doesn’t mean the differences aren’t there or that other people can’t hear them.

***** Meanwhile ******

I got ahold of a download purporting to be the high-res release. It’s VERY weirdly different than all other versions I’ve heard of the soundtracks: thin, no low-end… not sure it’s legit, but if it is, it’s bizarre.

Post
#1203191
Topic
Empire Strikes back 35mm restoration feedback thread (POUT) (a WIP)
Time

poita said:
It is in two parts, download both and use WinRar or similar to decompress to a single file.
https://we.tl/KTFi9G8t9B
https://wetransfer.com/downloads/53e6c1141a27d2891c9bb2a15bffe3dd20180503053533/8258e5aa2b976c5a31ddeb3fac69704820180503053533/ce0e7c

I’m on a mac and I’m having a bear of a time trying to get these open. I generally get “incomplete” or “file damaged” error notices. Is anyone on a Mac able to watch these, and if so, what did you use to unwrap?

Post
#1058632
Topic
The theatrical colors of the Star Wars trilogy
Time

So the reference slide is being scanned, then the resulting digital image (assuming a properly calibrated monitor) is compared to the slide to make sure that what is seen in the monitor matches the slide perfectly? After this is dialed in, we can assume that anything going through the scanning process is accurate, too. I think I have it.

Thanks for the explanation!