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GuardianoftheWhills

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6-Jan-2022
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30-Mar-2022
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Post
#1466881
Topic
<strong>The Book Of Boba Fett</strong> (live action series) - a general discussion thread - * <strong>SPOILERS</strong> *
Time

ZkinandBonez said:

GuardianoftheWhills said:

Also, it’s really striking how much of the praise for the show is focused on fan service. But it’s not a substitute for a strong narrative and risks turning Star Wars into a zombie franchise.

I can’t speak for others, but I’m not enjoying the show so far because of fan service but because I think it has so far has been an interesting character story and I hope it will continue to be so. Sure, not every SW story needs to be a redemption arc, but it is very baked into the DNA of the franchise and I don’t think a series where Boba Fett is just a ruthless bounty hunter would be all that interesting. A character driven series needs more depth than that, and based on what we’ve been give so far I think we’ll get it.

Just because we’ve gotten one mediocre episode with some wonky effects and action I don’t think there’s any need to panic. I mean we’re not even halfway through the series yet.

We’ve had two mediocre episodes - 1 & 3.

Where is this interesting character story? Can you explain why you think it is compelling? In what way do you think this is adding to the characterisation of Boba Fett?

Why does a supposedly ruthless bounty hunter who’s been left for dead in the stomach of a monster and then experienced the loss of his new tribe want to rule with ‘respect’ (especially when almost everyone around him blatantly disrespects him)? Why doesn’t he want to get revenge or at least impose order? That would at least be consistent with his characterisation prior to this show. Why is he seemingly so naïve?

I cannot think of any well regarded series where the plot is as aimless as this. It’s like watching a Star Wars screensaver.

Episode 2 showed this could be better - I want it to be better. But even a good director can only take a story so far if the writing isn’t up to scratch.

We shouldn’t have to wade through an hour of mediocrity in the hope later episodes might be better. There are only seven episodes - they should all be high quality. If the producers can’t manage that then they should cut the number of episodes.

Post
#1466861
Topic
<strong>The Book Of Boba Fett</strong> (live action series) - a general discussion thread - * <strong>SPOILERS</strong> *
Time

StarkillerAG said:

Also, I feel like they made Boba way too soft in this show. I get that he’s been through some traumatic stuff, but he just seems blind to the realities of running a criminal organization. Instead of him being the calculating warrior from the OT and Mando, his solution to everything seems to be “give the bad guys some money and hope they go away.” And that tendency was especially bad this episode: did they really need to include that scene of him going kawaii-mode over the baby Rancor?

We’re three episodes in and the audience still hasn’t been given a clear reason why Boba wants to be a crime lord. Furthermore, it’s even less clear HOW Boba is a crime lord, given that he lacks the necessary organisation to be one. &, no, a bunch of pouting cyber-mods doesn’t address that deficiency.

It does make me wonder if the show was a last minute stand-in for the Mandalorian season 3, and there’s some truth to the rumours of behind the scenes difficulties. But perhaps that’s being to charitable to Favreau, and the limitations of his writing ability are being exposed here. The plot manages to be both simplistic and convoluted. They need to put a good writers room together.

& I agree they need to stop ‘humanising’ the villains. They don’t all need redemption arcs. There are other interesting character arcs.

Also, it’s really striking how much of the praise for the show is focused on fan service. But it’s not a substitute for a strong narrative and risks turning Star Wars into a zombie franchise.

Post
#1466649
Topic
<strong>The Book Of Boba Fett</strong> (live action series) - a general discussion thread - * <strong>SPOILERS</strong> *
Time

I’m glad I qualified my praise for the previous episode because this week’s was drek. Rodriguez has a unique talent for making this world look so cheap. The Bantha Bobba rode in the flashback looked like a muppet.

The fight choreography was lacking. Bobba is no worse for wear after being tossed around, choked, bitten and crushed? Then he lets Black Krrsantan just walk away. The Hutts are just leaving?

The Vespa scooters & their riders seemed jarringly out of place - a Quadrophenia homage on Tatooine? They seemed like something from a bad Syfy or CW show. What was with the bizarrely slow ‘chase’ scene?

Where are the stakes? What is the hook? We’re three episodes in yet the present day story is still thin and underdeveloped. I don’t expect the Sopranos in Space but the poor plotting and characterisation is really exposed when you don’t have a strong director capable of elevating the very basic writing.

GuardianoftheWhills said:

The only negative I’ll add at this point is that the sparseness of the narrative - as with the Mandalorian - really requires great direction to elevate the material. The Rick Famuyiwa and Deborah Chow episodes of the Mandalorian were real standouts. Famuyiwa’s ‘The Believer’ from Season 2 being the high point for me.

Unfortunately, I didn’t enjoy Robert Rodriguez’s opening episode of the series, nor has stint on the Mandalorian season 2. I hope his subsequent episodes don’t drag down the show’s pacing.

The handling of Bobba Fett here reminds me of how the Prequels undermined Vader: the economy of his dialogue was a large part of his menace. He didn’t say much but what he did say was pointed and delivered with weight.

The Book of Bobba Fett leaves me wondering did we really need this chapter in his life? More than that, it leaves me thinking who is this inept wanna be crime lord? How can someone who was one of the top bounty hunters in the galaxy be so ignorant of the underworld? How does his organisation work when it seems to only consist of him, Fennec, a couple of Gamorrean guards and a few droids? Why is he so ‘nice’?

With any luck we get a better director who can at least make these issues less glaring. But this show underlines some significant problems with the Mandoverse. I’m looking forward to some other show runners being rather more ambitious.

Post
#1465690
Topic
<strong>The Book Of Boba Fett</strong> (live action series) - a general discussion thread - * <strong>SPOILERS</strong> *
Time

This was a massive step up from the first episode. Better pacing and direction. It felt far more cinematic, with the lighting and cinematography disguising the limitations of filming in the Volume for the most part. The flashbacks were also far less jarring as a result.

Plus it drew on the new and original expanded universe without seeming too much like fan service.

Black Krrsantan looked suitably menacing. The Hutt Twins were a great new addition. With the Pyke Syndicate too, it’s shaping up to be the exploration of the Star Wars’ underworld it promised to be - if it can keep to this quality.

The train attack reminded me of the one from the early 1980s Classic Star Wars newspaper strips - where Luke derails an Imperial desert train under attack from Chubbits on the planet Aridus. The train designs are very similar - see Classic Star Wars issue 10.

Camie and Fixer getting into scrapes at Tosche Station recalled Biggs’s comments to Luke in the Star Wars radio drama that they would never amount to much: “They’ll never leave Tatooine - maybe never get as far as Mos Eisley. … Fixer’s just about smart enough to know he’s better off being a big noise in a small room. Camie’s dumb enough to think she’s made the prize catch hereabouts.”

Liked the parallels between the Tuskens’ aquatic past and Boba’s own watery upbringing on Kamino.

The ‘humanising’ of the Tuskens felt very classic Star Wars - the indigenous species battling superior tech - and a modern day counterpoint to their portrayal in the OT and PT.

The only negative I’ll add at this point is that the sparseness of the narrative - as with the Mandalorian - really requires great direction to elevate the material. The Rick Famuyiwa and Deborah Chow episodes of the Mandalorian were real standouts. Famuyiwa’s ‘The Believer’ from Season 2 being the high point for me.

Unfortunately, I didn’t enjoy Robert Rodriguez’s opening episode of the series, nor has stint on the Mandalorian season 2. I hope his subsequent episodes don’t drag down the show’s pacing.

On the plus side, I hope we’ll see Steph Green direct more Star Wars TV.