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The originaltrilogy.com acronym buster — Page 2

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Nope. Tella-sinny.

1Gb = 1,000,000,000 or 1,073,741,824 bytes, apparently?
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Are you sure? Are you perhaps one of those movie industry experts I referred to in my post?

So you're saying the "e" on the end of telecine is a long "e" sound?

On your question, yes, it depends on if you're measuring RAM memory amounts (1024k) or hard drive capacity (1000k).

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I always thought it was telly-sign

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The fact that "telecine" is pronounced "tella-sinny" makes my brain hurt to no end. This pronunciation doesn't follow ANY language's phonetic rules.

If I had a time machine, I would go back in time and kill the first person who pronounced it that way.

You know of the rebellion against the Empire?

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I have worked with telecine guys in the UK, the US, New Zealand and Australia and it is always tellysinny, or the close variant tellasinny. Don't know about France.

As to why, probably because tellysinny sounds like one word, and cannot be mistaken for two or three discreet words. (unlike Tell a Sinner, or Telly Sign, or Tell a Sign or Tell a Sin)
Also:
a) It kinda rhymes (telly, sinny)
b) The abbreviation of television (when not TV) was already "telly" as in 'turn the telly on', no one says 'turn the tell-uh' on.
But tellasinna sounds like Tell a Sinner which is confusing and the uh sound on the end is ugly.
c) Tellysign sounds like a sign of some description to hang on the telly. Tellysign also follows no rules any way, not many people say sign-ema for cinema.
d) I think most English countries pronounce the first syllable of cinema as (roughly) Sin.


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Dam, I was way off...I always read it as "tella-scene" but then again I'm a child when it comes to this whole film making/ film restoration scene.....

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Laserman's explanation fails to address two points:

1. Almost nobody outside the weird countries of the British Commonwealth (i.e. all of them, except for Canada) uses "telly" to mean "TV". Especially not in the US, where "tellisini" is apparently de rigeur. So where'd we get "telly" instead of "tel'-schwa"?

2. The other obvious pronunciation -- there are at least three of us who have to this point assumed it was "tel'-schwa-seen" -- is not explained away. To my ears, it sounds nicer. It's shorter, and ends with a nice familiar "n" sound, rather than the distinctly furrin-sounding "i" sound. It also rhymes with (and has the same number of syllables as) "magazine", which everybody's familiar with. Or "melamine", say. Or even "vaccine".

Or do you propose we start pronouncing it "vaxini"?
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I can't account for Canadian tone deafness, but unlike most English terms, industry terms (especially obscure industries) tend to have a lot of consistency in pronunciation, probably because it isn't open to the sort of evolution of words that happens with wide exposure.

So if you invent a term, you get to set the pronunciation, RANK /CINTEL ( Rank was a british company) invented the telecine in the late 30s, (kinescopes were used before that) so probably the name came from an Englishman which would explain the telly part.

As for using the pronunciation of the last syllable as 'seen' it is far too close to 'scene' for me, tell a scene would probably cause endless 'who's on first' type discussions.

Whatever way you slice it, like most industry terms (and unlike most common language) there is a correct pronunciation and it seems consistent between English speaking countries.

Now who is up for the correct way to pronounce kinescope?
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Kin-uh-skohp. How's that?

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Originally posted by: Karyudo
Or "melamine", say. Or even "vaccine".

Or do you propose we start pronouncing it "vaxini"?
Not a valid argument - these words have different roots, they are formed by the addition of the -ine suffix, meaning "a substance derived from".

Melamine comes from melam and amine, amine is a substance derived from ammonia. Vaccine comes from the latin "vacca" meaning cow. The first ever vaccine (for smallpox) was a substance derived from cowpox.

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Originally posted by: Moth3r
Not a valid argument


You're picking this as the first time to break that out of your toolbox?? Geez, the number of times on this forum that that could have already applied...

(Of course I know you're right. I love these forums, too!)

Just know that when all y'all read any future post of mine with the word "vaccine" or "magazine" in it, I'll be pronouncing them "vaxini" and "magazini", just to be perverse. Sort of like releasing the OUT in non-anamorphic widescreen, from an LD master, upsampled from NTSC for PAL. It's not right, but what are you gonna do?
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Originally posted by: Karyudo
The other obvious pronunciation -- there are at least three of us who have to this point assumed it was "tel'-schwa-seen" -- is not explained away.
The key word here is "assumed." Those who are supporting that pronunciation have only read the term.

"Cine," as in "cine camera," has always been pronounced "sinny."

Also...

Dictionary.com: tel·e·cin·e [tel-uh-sin-ee, tel-uh-sin-ee] - link;

Merriam-Webster Online: tele·cine ['te-li-"si-nE] - link;

Hear Merriam-Webster's spoken pronunciation - here.
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Originally posted by: Laserman
So if you invent a term, you get to set the pronunciation, RANK /CINTEL ( Rank was a british company) invented the telecine in the late 30s, (kinescopes were used before that) so probably the name came from an Englishman which would explain the telly part.


*Erik sets his time machine for late 1930s England*

You know of the rebellion against the Empire?

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Erik - The Telecinator.


By the way, Erik, while you are there find and kill the goose that decided "schwa" was an obvious way to represent the sound "?"
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Upside-down "e" works for me, or "uh."
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Sadly, Adolf Hitler's antics really ruined the schwa's image. He never should have gone around putting up those damned schwa stickers all over the place.

Since I'll be in the late 1930s, I'll see if can pop over to Germany and "take care of" the schwa situation as well.

You know of the rebellion against the Empire?

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Originally posted by: THX
Those who are supporting that pronunciation have only read the term.


Right you are. But that's why I say it's an "obvious" pronunciation: if three people who have only ever read the term have come up with the same pronunciation independently, then it's probably for a reason. It's not because each of those three people is mental and doesn't know how to pronounce anything.

It's going to be tough, but I'm resigned to the fact that I've gotta change. Despite the fact I still think there's lots of good reasons it could/should be "tel-schwa-seen"...

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And here, up until this thread, I was always pronouncing it "tel-uh-sign." To further clarify, that's a silent "g" not "sigg-un."

Now, where did I put my book of Keeng Ahrthuhr and the Nytes of the Rownd Taybull?
I am fluent in over six million forms of procrastination.
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Originally posted by: Karyudo
Originally posted by: THX
Those who are supporting that pronunciation have only read the term.


Right you are. But that's why I say it's an "obvious" pronunciation: if three people who have only ever read the term have come up with the same pronunciation independently, then it's probably for a reason. It's not because each of those three people is mental and doesn't know how to pronounce anything.

It's going to be tough, but I'm resigned to the fact that I've gotta change. Despite the fact I still think there's lots of good reasons it could/should be "tel-schwa-seen"...


I put it down to people who are on insanity peppers and go to the sign-ma or the seen-ma to watch their movies, and go sailing on their yatcheds
i.e. They are looking at the straight spelling rather than the root of the word to come up with tel-schwa-seen.

How come my upside down e came out as a question mark *after* I posted the message, it showed as an upside down e when I typed it in. Hmmm... I sense a disturbance in the schwartz.

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back on topic: MTFBWU- well if you don't know what it means I don't know why you are here, but I guess for non-native english speakers, some acronyms are just hard to figure out.
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May The F*%* Boris Wake Up?

Sadly it took me quite a few seconds to work out what MTFBWU was - I'm crap at deciphering custom number plates as well (license plates)
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Originally posted by: Laserman
How come my upside down e came out as a question mark *after* I posted the message, it showed as an upside down e when I typed it in. Hmmm... I sense a disturbance in the schwartz.


Dunno, but I had the same problem. That's why I've resorted to spelling out "schwa" all the damn time.

Actually, I would submit it's those people who pronounce C-I-N-E "sinny" who are neglecting the root of the word: it's from French (innit? they invented movies...), and I'll bet you any Frenchman worth his baguette would cold-pronounce C-I-N-E as "seen".

Maybe it's our nominal biligualism, but I know I'm not the only Canadian who has ever read "telecine" as "tel-schwa-seen".

Or it could be something in the water...

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Yeah but you don't say seen-ma or do you?