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Interstellar - ColorMatching BluRay to 70mm — Page 2

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Thanks!

Although some scenes would have unnatural colors, we are talking about a film, so… if you think about it, maybe 90% of action Hollywood movies released in the latest years have some (or all) of them!

According to my (brief) tests, it seems to work well, but I should watch the whole movie (still encoding) - even if, to be honest, after few minutes the brain “set up” the white point, so it will say to my eyes it is OK, even if it’s not… 😄

70mm cells: I took your picture as inspiration because, reading what you wrote about, it should look like a lot close as it is when watched live; but don’t know about those other cells, tough… pretty sure they were scanned without too much care, so can’t be trusted as color reference, unless the scanner have done a good job like you, and wrote about it!

Nevertheless, it would be nice to have a look at them, and maybe discover that they match your 70mm one!

[Fundamental Collection] thread| homepage: blog.spoRv.com| fan preservation forum: fanres.com|

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take a look at the comparison for the whole movie:
http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/216927

That’s night and day! I wish you’d do the same whole movie comparison for “The Dark Knight” using the same process to resurrect the blues and teals. It might finally look the way I saw it on gorgeous DCP.

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Watched the whole regraded movie, and it surprisingly (even to me!) worked very well!

Despite the cool tints seen in the comparison, I didn’t expect it to be quite warm indeed; every shot was spot on, color wise, in particular of course the “water” planet - the blue cast added to many IMAX shot helped a lot there.

[Fundamental Collection] thread| homepage: blog.spoRv.com| fan preservation forum: fanres.com|

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Thanks! Or, maybe, 50% for Earth scenes, and 100% for the space ones? It’s (50+100)/2=75 percent as well, after all… 😄

Well, at least the sea planet at 100% is really great, while the ice planet works better at 50%.

Made a quick comparison with some 70mm cells - the ones that seemed better…

top “inspired by 70mm” (100%), middle real 70mm cells, bottom BD:

I suspect that, when improperly captured, the cells show more green than the one that is really present… but you guys here have more knowledge about that. But the 50% seems more spot on IMHO.

[Fundamental Collection] thread| homepage: blog.spoRv.com| fan preservation forum: fanres.com|

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Interstellar’s new 4K UHD Blu-ray has been zoomed-in and cropped on all four sides; much more than the IMAX shots in the Blu-ray.

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Papai2013 said:

Interstellar’s new 4K UHD Blu-ray has been zoomed-in and cropped on all four sides; much more than the IMAX shots in the Blu-ray.

I just picked up the Nolan 4K Collection, I’ll have to check it out. I have a one of the decent IMAX cells that came with the original BD release of Interstellar.

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The IMAX shots of all the Nolan films on UHD have been zoomed-in and cropped out from all four sides.

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I’ve been planning on buying the 4K copy of Interstellar. I know MakeMKV has the ability to rip some 4K discs and I have a blu-ray drive in my computer that is supported in the list. Has anyone compared the color timing with the normal blu-ray? I figure once I pick up the 4K version I will make it my mission to complete this project

It doesn’t hurt to offer help, but it always hurts to disregard those that do.

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I saw ‘Interstellar’ on 35mm. It was part of the 4th edition of ‘Reframing the Future of Film’ with Tacita Dean and Christopher Nolan, presented by Filmmaker and film preservationist Shivendra Singh Dungarpur.
The screening took place at a beautiful art-deco cinema in Mumbai called Liberty Cinema. The crowd was chanting “Nolan, Nolan” as a chorus. What did strike me was how incredibly humble and contained a person he is. Very reserved, regal and calm.

As for the projection itself, it was a beautiful looking print with gorgeous, richly saturated, warm colours. Textural details were delicious. The difference between the DCP/Blu-ray and the print was that the latter had a soft look, which was very soothing for the eyes. The details never took a hit and I noticed no intrusive black crush. The colours were very much closer to the images of the 70mm film cells that were posted on the first page of this thread.

The colours in the ice-planet scenes were slightly dull for my tastes, lacking in good contrast (the Blu-ray is even worse in these regards). It wasn’t at all grainy, neither did the print distractingly shake. But thankfully, it wasn’t stable as dead, like digital projection. The sound was out of this world powerful and I remembered that the sound during the 90’s 35mm screenings were also this loud and thumping, but never hurt the ears like digital sound does now in multiplexes. There’s a nice echo in analog sound, especially in older single-screen cinema halls, that creates a larger-than-life soundscape.

As for the cropping (and I took careful notice), the sides were quite tight, though never compromising the framing. The home videos are much wider in that regard. But I prefer the framing of the 35mm print as it was tight and focussed on the action without adding too many distracting elements at the edges. The vertical portion of the film frame was not masked however and we could often see the tail end of the previous film frame running through the projector. The cinema did not have projectors since 2014, so they can be forgiven for not getting all the necessary equipment.

But having seen 35mm film projection, I prefer it any day than over-hyped digital projection. Digital is pixelated and hurts my eyes while film soothed them. I never got any eye-fatigue watching this. Actually, I would say the 35mm projected image is close to the quality of the UHD blu-ray in terms of the details and the colour, than the Blu-ray. However, the home videos look a bit sharper but that’s a feature I don’t really need or even want.

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That sounds about right from what I saw in 70mm.

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What did strike me was that the first few scenes were really green, yellow and orange. The colours were very deep and rich, the likes of which I don’t recall seeing since the 90’s.