Sign In

anamorphous2351

User Group
Trusted Members
Join date
30-Jul-2018
Last activity
15-Apr-2019
Posts
3

Post History

Post
#1231779
Topic
Goldeneye 35mm Scan and Preservation
Time

This one should be cool to see, actually! I remember seeing GoldenEye in cinemas back in late '95 and being shocked to actually notice the boom mic creeping in during certain shots. The one I remember most of all was when the girl is supposedly inspecting computer equipment she wants to buy, as a means of looking up Boris. From further memory, I think it also occurs during Bond’s early scenes with M, when they see the EMP blast going off on the screens. Curiously, with both the original widescreen laserdisc release and all DVD and HD issues the movie appears to be quite tightly cropped and re-framed, perhaps to hide this issue.

Post
#1231777
Topic
Logo Preservation
Time

Ah, the old logo-plastering situation… Next to ‘blanket-tinting’ (aka: making classic movies look like a Listerine filter has been applied over the image) this would have to be the single most annoying thing about video presentations and rereleases of films. It seems to be a curious sort of problem, as some studios seem to be OK with original logos being left intact on their back-catalogue product (Paramount, Columbia, Universal,) while others feel a compulsion to update logos to reflect whatever corporate situation they may currently find themselves in (MGM, WB.) Also, changes of rights ownership can affect this situation. But there have been instances where the takeover of a movie’s rights from one entity to another still sees the original production logo(s) being left intact, ie: “Psycho.” In the case of both logo plastering and blanket-tinting (even soundtrack design alteration) what the powers-that-be seem to forget is that movies are a product and reflection of the time in which they were produced and released. Whilst the current advancements in technology have granted the benefit of preserving film history, it shouldn’t be used as a means of changing the artistic integrity of the original elements. Logos should and must fall into the same category of consideration. “If that’s how it originally was, that’s how it should stay.”