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Supermartyohreturns

User Group
Members
Join date
22-Apr-2016
Last activity
22-Apr-2016
Posts
7

Post History

Post
#933143
Topic
Worst Blu-ray transfers thread
Time

KevinStriker said:

So has anybody mentioned Moontrap from 1989 with Walter Koenig and Bruce Campbell?

Good LORD. That’s the worst Blu-ray transfer ever right there. Terrible picture quality dipping into VHS at times with pale blacks and no detail (which would be bad enough it weren’t cropped from 4:3 to 16:9… and it is). And unlike some of Anchor Bay’s output, this release doesn’t even have the courtesy of giving us a decent audio track to make up for the picture quality. Its audio track poorly defined with muddled music, sound effects and speech.

http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Moontrap-Blu-ray/102290/#Screenshots

Wowsers!! That one doesn’t look very good, but it seems the fingers point more to company that Olive licenced it from (Olive hardly does any remastering work on titles they get, just take the studio 1080p files they receive and plop 'em onto Blu), as they took a Laserdisc master (made from a worn 16mm print) and applied a crop job plus DNR.

Post
#933142
Topic
Worst Blu-ray transfers thread
Time

captainsolo said:
But the worst major release from a studio aside from poor elements or a smaller label having lack of money or care…is Universals Family Plot. Holy **** you can obviously tell they did not care about their Hitchcock stable and still do not. What an atrocious mangling of the Master’s final work. The DVD is better in every single possible way.

That one wasn’t great, but it didn’t seem THAT bad. Predator Ultimate Hunter edition… YUCK!!!

Post
#933139
Topic
Fullscreen Laserdisc / DVD Preservation
Time

Jp4195 said:

So X-Men United along with the first Fast and Furious are not pan and scan in the traditional sense but rather sort of a hybrid between open matte and pan and scan >

Yes, because the most common way of getting 4:3 out of Super 35 films is using the full framing it was shot in (usually 1.78 or 1.66:1, though some are full 1.37 Academy) then side cropping to 4:3. VFX can vary from getting the same treatment if done on the full S35 ratio (True Lies and SM2 are examples), or being P&S if they were animated/matted to OAR during production. Most HDTV airings of the F&F films are open matte (though some shots or VFX on the later ones like Fast and Furious may be cropped).

Post
#933137
Topic
Fullscreen Laserdisc / DVD Preservation
Time

Jp4195 said:

Im a little confused about ET, are the full screen dvd’s open matte for some shots but not others ?

When I last saw the 20th anniversary 4:3 DVD, I remember the OP/ED credits and actors only scenes like the one with Elliot’s brothers at the table had alot more vertical information (but loses a bit on the sides) compared to the widescreen theatrical cut on disc 2. That scene there (and a few others) is clearly matted top and bottom while gaining some side information. On the shots with ET and the VFX, they are clearly side cropped but do gain a bit on the top and bottom, meaning they were hard matted/animated somewhere at around 1.66 so cropping to 4:3 wouldn’t be such a mess.

Post
#933122
Topic
Logo Preservation
Time

Charles Threepio said:

Hello. I am Charles Threepio, human-logo enthusiast relations.

I wish to bring up the topic of logo preservation. All too often, production and distribution logos are deleted from current prints of films (a phenomenon logo enthusiasts like to call “plastering”), resulting in the loss of such great logos as Carolco’s “Space Streaks” logo (found on early prints of “Rambo II” and “Angel Heart”), the Warner Bros. “Big W” logo from the '70s, and UA’s pre-1981 logos. Logos are works of art, too. I consider it a matter of great importance to the logo community that more old prints of more older films are found which preserve those old logos and others before it’s too late. Especially the sooner we find an original theatrical print of “Rambo II” or “Angel Heart” with the original Carolco logo, the better. And as mentioned earlier, that’s not the only one, either.

(Oh, and an original theatrical print of “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” as distributed by Paramount would be nice, too, as far as logo preservation is concerned.)

Thank you for listening to this summary of my defense of production and distribution logos. I know there’s more to the logo story than that, but I’d be here all night if I were to recount the whole thing.

Question, are you ryanasaurus007 on CLG?

Anyways, yeah this bugs me too. But at least i’m not the only one who notices these things in groups outside of CLG.

Post
#933119
Topic
Fullscreen Laserdisc / DVD Preservation
Time

Well, since I cannot recover the last account I made because I can’t retrieve the last email I gave with it, I opened up a new one so I hope no one has a problem with that. If any admin does, let me know.

Anyways, I have a few to add. The full-screen versions of E.T have the credits and actor only shots that are unmatted 4:3 (some may be zoomed in further than others but it depends on the shot). The FF DVD of Road to Perdition, while being S35, is only cropped a little bit on the sides in most shots but shows more vertically in 4:3 (and I think in one office shot, you can see lights at the end of the wall prop).

For the later X-Men FF DVDs, I think X2 used a 1.78 open matte master and side cropped it to 4:3, but then also cropped the VFX shots which I believe were hard matted to OAR. X-Men: The Last Stand I believe was pan and scanned from a matted scope master like one of the Harry Potter films were. The Fast and Furious full screen DVDs I also hear, are 1.78 OM masters side cropped to 4:3. But 2F2F strangely had hard matted live action shots that were P&S, while the SFX were opened back up to the VistaVision ratio but cropped to 4:3.