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Shane Rollins

User Group
Members
Join date
20-Feb-2016
Last activity
27-Jan-2019
Posts
19

Post History

Post
#910156
Topic
What Listening Mode is Best For The TN1 restore?
Time

There were two different reels in 1977, a mono reel and a stereo reel. The mono reel had the same sound sent to all of the speakers in the room. The stereo sent the left track to the left of the room, and the right track to the right of the room. These tracks were different. The mono version is only available on the rare 16mm reel from 1977. The stereo track is available on all Betamax, VHS, Videodisc (CED,) and Laserdisc copies from 1982 and 1983. The Laserdisc track came out in 1993, and is the stereo with mono bits mixed in. It’s on the Definitive Laserdiscs, the 1995 “last chance to own the original” releases, and the 2006 bonus discs. There was another track in 1984, and it was all copies made from 1984 to 1992. Then the Definitive track took over. If you want the mono track, look for Puggo JarJar’s Yoda on the forum. He did a preservation of the 16mm reel.

Post
#910138
Topic
VHS boxed set
Time

With the copy protection defeated, it would look like any movie. It would either be square (4:3) if it is not stretched, or widescreen (16:9) if it is. However, without the copy protection defeated, the picture will be shaky and flashy. It will constantly get lighter and darker. With the sound, the HiFi will not work, and the tape will play with normal sound. This might cause a humming or hissing sound. This makes for an unpleasant viewing experience, and it sometimes is unwatchable. Sometimes, it might not even record if it picks up copy protection.

Post
#910126
Topic
Discussion: Most Realistic Replica Lightsaber - Recommendations?
Time

I saw a Black Series, Force FX Lightsaber on sale from Hasbro. It has a blue blade, but I’m not sure whether it is from IV or V. I say this because I currently have no unedited copies, and I can’t figure out which lightsaber I’m looking at when I watch my 97 tapes or my Blu-Rays. The lightsaber runs about $150, but depending on where and when you get it, the price may change. Also, there are many reviews that the lightsaber is not very loud, so don’t be surprised when you get it.

Post
#910119
Topic
Help: looking for... Preservations of the Original Star Wars Trilogy?
Time

althor1138 I asked people which release they had and they’re like “It’s the original. It’s definitely the original.” I know the difference between copies. I have heard that they have unedited DVDs (which depending on the way you view the bonus disc, is not true,) and unedited Blu-Ray discs (which isn’t true at all.) There are some edited releases I was looking for, but if people are lying about which release they have, it’s probably a bad idea to buy from them. You can only trust a product as much as you trust its seller. Also, bootlegs can occasionally cause problems. The last one that I got (not on the forum, though) broke my VCR. I had to spend three hours at the store trying out VCRs to find the best one, and it cost me $20, which is money I don’t have. I have one guy (not on the forum, either,) saying that he has rare versions of the OT, and his uncle has Laserdiscs of the OT. Then again, he could’ve also played poker with Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny last night. I just don’t want to get screwed when it comes to these movies. I already got screwed once with these movies (Thanks George,) and I don’t want it to happen again.

Post
#910084
Topic
Star Wars: Episode VII to be directed by J.J. Abrams **NON SPOILER THREAD**
Time

LiquidKaltar It depends on what you are willing to give up. For ESB and ROTJ, the 1993 laserdiscs, 1995 laserdiscs, 1995 widescreen VHS trilogy, or the 2006 bonus discs are the way to go. However, these are all LETTERBOX releases, not WIDESCREEN. THERE IS A DIFFERENCE. With letterbox, the black bars on the top and bottom are built into the frame. If you’ve ever watched a widescreen movie or TV show on a fullscreen TV (one of the old tube ones,) that is what it will look like. If you have one of these TVs, the picture will look like that either way. However, if you play them back on a device that recognizes the difference between a fullscreen and widescreen image, you’ll be shocked. The device will think it’s fullscreen. It will either stretch the image (like a VHS played back on a flatscreen TV,) or it will put bars on the sides and center the image, creating a box-like image. The end result will be a picture surrounded by black. You can always zoom in, but you will lose picture quality in the process. With ANH, it’s a whole different story. There are FOUR (yes, four, as in 2+2) different audio tracks for the original ANH. When it was released in 1977, some theaters got a mono reel, and others got a stereo reel. With the mono reel, the same soundtrack was sent to all speakers in the room. With the stereo reel, all of the sound on the left track was sent to the speakers in the left half of the room, and all of the sound on the right track was sent to the speakers in the right half of the room. These tracks were different. Different takes, different lines, and sometimes missing or added lines. All this depended on what theater you were in. The 16mm reel released in 1977 has the mono track. The copies made in 1982 and 1983 have the stereo track. These include the Video Rental Library copies (available on Betamax and VHS,) the 20th Century Fox Video Copies, and the drawer-case CBS/FOX Video copies. The later two are on Betamax, VHS, Videodisc (CED,) and Laserdisc. Despite the quality in the Laserdiscs, they are a time compressed version, and a few minutes of the movie is missing. The same problem occured with the Videodiscs (CED.) In 1984, when the new Betamax and VHS versions were released, they had a new audio track, that had the best parts of both soundtracks. This appeared on those copies, the 1985 Laserdisc, the 1986 and 1987 VHS, the 1989 Laserdisc, the 1990 VHS (available individually or in a trilogy), both 1992 VHS tapes (fullscreen and widescreen, fullscreen available individually or with a trilogy, widescreen only in the trilogy set,) and both 1992 Laserdiscs. The fourth track is on the Definitive Laserdiscs from 1993. This track was the stereo track with bits from the mono track mixed in. It is also on the 1995 releases and the 2006 bonus discs. With the picture, it gets worse. The widescreen copies in 1989 and 1992 were based off of a flawed Japanese Laserdisc, and the black bars on the top and bottom constantly change their position throughout the movie. The only widescreen copies without this problem have the Definitive audio track. Unless you edit the movie to your pleasing (no, George, I’m not talking to you) you will have to give up something to watch ANH. My preference is currently nonexistent, but it would be widescreen picture with the mono track. Take a look at these notes, weigh the pros and cons, and decide what’s best for you.

Post
#909788
Topic
Team Negative1
Time

If you’re right (I’m not here to start an argument) then Harmy has lied not only to me but to tens of thousands of OT fans, if not more. I have no clue why he couldn’t just do it legally, but if what you’re saying is true, then he’s just as wrong as them. I’m not as concerned for the fate of his movies, as much as I am for the fact that thousands of people have unknowingly broke the law because of this. I was planning something similar to this. I was going to try to preserve the home video releases of the OT. The first thing I was planning to do was contact Lucasfilm for permission. They would not be up for public viewing or downloading, by they could be used in some way for educational purposes.

Post
#909785
Topic
Team Negative1
Time

Harmy has had permission from the studios to do this since day one. He doesn’t want people just going freelance all over his movies. The ROTJ scan might have been obtained through legal means. However, Harmy is a citizen of e Czech Republic, and I’m not familiar with their laws when it comes to copyrights and piracy. He has said that he has had permission, but that could be a crock for all I know. When it comes to the scan, he might have purchased it directly from Fox or Lucasfilm (or whoever owns the copyright over there.) Or it could’ve been obtained in ways that aren’t legal here (I’m in America) but are there (Czech Republic.)

Post
#909782
Topic
Team Negative1
Time

Despecialized counts as a fan edit, Team Negative One found as piracy. You need written permission from the company to copy an item directly. Harmy had these permissions, and he didn’t even run the risk of piracy. If the reel was legally obtained, and the team was given permission to do this, it would have all been legal. What Team Negative One did is literally the same as copying a movie on a computer and putting it on line. Sad but true.

Post
#909780
Topic
Team Negative1
Time

Harmy did something of a mash-up of releases. It’s kind of like taking five albums from the same artist and taking your favorite songs and putting them on one CD. Harmy used digital releases, Blu-Ray discs, DVDs, Laserdiscs, and other releases to make the Despecialized versions. Also, he clearly stated that you can’t buy or sell the despecialized versions. He also said that he doesn’t want people downloading them without compensating Lucasfilm. He has stated that he wants youo buy the corresponding Blu-Ray disc of the movie before you download it. If you have a trilogy or saga set, you’re in the clear to download the despecialized versions. If you don’t, then you’re in the wrong. And you can buy a 35mm or 70mm prin directly from the company. You probably have to sign a ton of contracts that say that you won’t do anything illegal with it (you all know the song and dance by now). Then, you can buy it. No secondhand vendor is legal, because they are in direct violation of the contract.

Post
#909776
Topic
Help: looking for... Preservations of the Original Star Wars Trilogy?
Time

This is an appeal to all Star Wars fans. I am in an attempt to preserve every release of the Star Wars Trilogy, and I need your help. I am looking for copies of the Star Wars Trilogy, and I have nowhere else to turn to. I’ve done my research, and I’ve found that every single copy of an original movie (meaning Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back, and Return Of The Jedi), whether edited or not, has something that can be used. Since Amazon and eBay turn up few results, I figured that I could turn to my fellow fans for help. What I am looking for is any Betamax, VHS, Videodisc (CED), or Laserdisc releases of the original trilogy. When it comes to DVDs, I am specifically looking for the 2004 bonus disc and the 2006 limited editions in widescreen. Also, if you have them, I am looking for the machines to play these movies. I don’t have a lot of money, but if a reasonable offer comes my way, I will definitely consider it. Also, if a fan can somehow find it in their heart to part with a movie or player for little or no charge, I will be eternally grateful to you.

Please list specifically what you have. Pictures are also appreciated. If you don’t know what copy you have, please ask, and I or another fan would be glad to help you.

I only have two rules about this:

  1. No bootlegs without my prior knowledge. They have broken my players in the past, and I really don’t want that to happen again. Also, I want to know what I’m getting in to before I get in to it.
  2. No lying. Plain and simple. Don’t tell me you have something when you don’t, and don’t lie about the details/quality of your product.

Please reply to my post if you or someone you know can help. This is a serious post, so please don’t just drop random comments on it. Only comment if you want to contribute to this in some way.

Thank you for all your help, and may the force be with you.

Post
#909766
Topic
Team Negative1
Time

The reel is the property of 20th Century Fox. It’s similar to the infamous 16mm print (aka Puggo Grande) of ANH that’s been circulating on e black market for going on 40 years. It was meant for schools, prisons, military bases, etc. However, people saw the dollar signs and starting selling them. Also, when he first copies of ANH hit the shelves in 1982, they were rental copies. The tapes, which were VHS and ßetamax, are the property of 20th Century Fox Video. They were supposed to be either kept by he rental store, thrown out, or returned to Fox. Instead, they were sold at a high price to consumers in what was called a “lifetime rental.” They could pay a few hundred dollars and keep the movie for life. Because it wasn’t legally sold, no contracts were broken. The Video Rental Library copies are rare today. Technically, you aren’t buy in the tape, you are buying the contract. All of these mentioned releases, reels and tapes, are still studio property to this day. If they have explicit, written permission from Fox and/or Lucasfilm, then it is okay. However, the admins did their research, and Team Negative One is unfortunately in the wrong on this one.