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Reddkryten

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Join date
23-Mar-2014
Last activity
6-Sep-2018
Posts
9

Post History

Post
#1238402
Topic
Who Designed The CGI Jabba In The 1997 Special Edition?
Time

The 97 Jabba is full of wrinkles and folds, he “looks” like a real object.
His design however doesn’t match the Jabba puppet at all. The best comparrison I can think of is a cartoon. Cartoons often simplify the design because drawing a complex figure over and over would become difficult. If you watch a cartoon based on a movie, the animated version is sort of a broad strokes version.

The later Jabba is a much closer match to the puppet, which is probably why I dislike it, the closer it gets the easier it is to see what is wrong. This Jabba lacks the texture of the previous one, it looks flat with the wrinkles painted on. This may be why he looked better in Phantom Menace, they painted it to look good front on in a particular lighting state, however when taken out of thaf environment it falls apart.

Post
#711943
Topic
Team Negative1 - Return of the Jedi 1983 - 35mm Theatrical Version (Release Details and Updates)
Time

Speaking of the bunker. At certain points the blue screen matte seems to go out of sync. It's when an imperial officer walks infront of the weird pylon structure, two rebels rush in. The rebels are followed by a black copy of their shape. And bits of the blue screen become visible. Would it be possible to see some of this.

Post
#701956
Topic
HD Broadcast Question
Time

Ah excellent, thanks so much for this. 

So most TV transfers were created earlier, before blu ray and usually were straight scans, with few or no deliberate changes.

Would I be right in assuming that when it comes to both modern films and less prestigious films, the blu and the TV version would usually share the same master?

I mean, the last Harry Potter film was released onto blu ray shortly after it finished in the cinema. There the TV and Blu would share a common transfer. However the first Harry Potter film, released when VHS was still around, may have had a HDTV transfer, then when it came to Blu years later, a new version may have been created?

And less prestigious titles. For something big like Ghostbusters, I imagine there might be a few transfers. But for more obscure films like Grosse Pointe Blank, Wings of a Dove or Bound (great films, but not massively popular or lucrative) they probably only scanned them once and would have no reason to pay for another.

Post
#701834
Topic
HD Broadcast Question
Time

Hi there.

i've just been reading through the treads, I'm very interested in preserving films for historical reasons as well as different versions for comparison.

However there is one question as have after reading these threads. Often the HD broadcast of a film will be different from the bluray, having different colours, grain etc. Why is this?

i can understand why this is the case with SD material, that built up over years and as new telecine technology became available or new tape formats, various new copies would be made. As I understand it, TV stations would buy the broadcast tapes and keep them. So one channel would have bought Star Trek tapes on BetaSP tapes in the 80s and have no reason to replace them. While a channel that started airing it in the nineties would have bought Digibeta tapes.

Either way, these tapes and versions built up over decades.

However, aren't all the HD copies fairly new? I'm not sure about the exact times, but wouldn't the HD scans have been made ten years ago at most? So why are there so many versions?

Post
#700451
Topic
Disney brings back all six movies to the big screen on 2014-05-03/04 - In Germany
Time

I'm a newbie here so I could be wrong, but surely it couldn't be 4k? Or if it is 4k it would be a big deal for the original trilogy?

My understanding is that the scans of the original trilogy, were all done at 1080p, just under 2k. So if Disney have a 4k screening, they would have had to rescan the negative?

Also, werent the last two prequels shot at 2k or under, so they would be impossible.