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Charles Threepio

User Group
Members
Join date
6-Feb-2016
Last activity
3-Jul-2022
Posts
353

Post History

Post
#907651
Topic
Info Thread: 3D Movies Preservation
Time

I’d like to see full HD 3D restorations of Spacehunter and Metalstorm (both of which I have on '80s VHS cassettes, respectively using the right and left eyes). I’d especially love to see Spacehunter in 3D without those annoying Japanese subtitles (they’re not annoying per se, it’s the hardcoding that annoys me).

–Charles Threepio
Human-Logo Enthusiast Relations

Post
#907645
Topic
Star Wars Prequels 35mm 4K Filmized Editions by Emanswfan (a WIP)
Time

Do you think you can do this treatment to the other eye of each of the 3D versions if and when you can get your hands on them? (And yes, believe it or not, all three of the prequels have indeed been converted. No word on when, let alone if, we’ll get 3D versions for the original trilogy yet, though I hope the original versions are the ones that get converted.)

–Charles Threepio
Human-Logo Enthusiast Relations

Post
#904884
Topic
Info: My Logo Preservation Project
Time

Hello. I am Charles Threepio, human-logo enthusiast relations.

I wish to bring up the topic of logo preservation. All too often, production and distribution logos are deleted from current prints of films (a phenomenon logo enthusiasts like to call “plastering”), resulting in the loss of such great logos as Carolco’s “Space Streaks” logo (found on early prints of “Rambo II” and “Angel Heart”), the Warner Bros. “Big W” logo from the '70s, and UA’s pre-1981 logos. Logos are works of art, too. I consider it a matter of great importance to the logo community that more old prints of more older films are found which preserve those old logos and others before it’s too late. Especially the sooner we find an original theatrical print of “Rambo II” or “Angel Heart” with the original Carolco logo, the better. And as mentioned earlier, that’s not the only one, either.

(Oh, and an original theatrical print of “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” as distributed by Paramount would be nice, too, as far as logo preservation is concerned.)

Thank you for listening to this summary of my defense of production and distribution logos. I know there’s more to the logo story than that, but I’d be here all night if I were to recount the whole thing.