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What are you reading? — Page 51

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Haven’t read that one in a while. I remember it being a thriller of sorts.

I remember getting the novel Shadow Hunter, The comic book of Darth Maul, a lego set of Qui Gon and Maul, and the Phantom Menace DVD as a gift.

I want to reread some of the legends canon books but i’m finding the books are quite expensive, maybe if my library opens i can essay to read them all again.

Like all i have is the Allston X-wing books and, I, Jedi by Stackpole. And i need to get all the Stackpole books. Need to replace my Zahn trilogy from the original paperback print. Was reading heir to the empire and the binding came off. I have a bunch of vintage sci-fi paperbacks as well i have to replace all the time when they fall apart. My Lord of the rings set is done for, the Dolphin edition from the 1960s.

I’m way behind on my read through of the Disney Star Wars books, i want to read some of the books. But i’ve only been able to read the novelizations and some of the Marvel comics. Loved Last Jedi the book was great. Han Solo’s funeral was touching, should’ve been in the movie. Luke was also more fully fleshed out and his motivation made far more sense.

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Currently reading Shadows Of The Empire.

I’m just a simple man trying to make my way in the universe.

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I like the Dark Lord Trilogy even if i’m not the biggest prequel fan. I think its Labyrinth of Evil, Revenge of the Sith, and Dark Lord the Rise of Darth Vader.

I also remember liking the Coruscant Nights trilogy.

There are so many legends books. I’ve pretty much read them all except for the Medstar books could never really get into that, tried a couple of times.

Read all the Dark Horse comics as well except for Invasion. Since Luke is barely in it. Even though its related to the New Jedi Order.

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JadedSkywalker said:

I like the Dark Lord Trilogy even if i’m not the biggest prequel fan. I think its Labyrinth of Evil, Revenge of the Sith, and Dark Lord the Rise of Darth Vader.

I also remember liking the Coruscant Nights trilogy.

There are so many legends books. I’ve pretty much read them all except for the Medstar books could never really get into that, tried a couple of times.

Read all the Dark Horse comics as well except for Invasion. Since Luke is barely in it. Even though its related to the New Jedi Order.

Nice!

I’m just a simple man trying to make my way in the universe.

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 (Edited)

Power, Albert - Azerbaijan Tales

Three novellas, set in Azerbaijan during Soviet control.
“Matinee In Baku” luncheons with a forgotten film star, waiting in a word-of-mouth popular cafe. In walks an older man, scruffy, yet charged with a probing intensity. He soon rakes the slumbering embers of memory. Secrets from the actress’s past; also secrets of her own mother, an even more legendary actress.
Buried business, ugly business. One wants suppressed, another wants excavated.
“The Pit-Crypts Of Kish” carries ripples of the first story. A minor character from “Matinee” is part of an archeological dig at Qabala, along with three men, and a party apparatchik.
Faith and history run parallel, if unevenly.
The ending felt not so much unresolved as unfinished, with several shingles of narrative tacked on in a concluding act. I was dissatisfied.
“The Sanatorium At Chakhirshirincelo” makes for a murky finale, yet compelling and fulfilling.
The director of the institute wonders if he can release an inmate, accused of murder, back to her hometown. To help him decide, another apparatchik arrives.
Different voices, conflicting agendas, diverse recollections, all muddy the waters. Not one unreliable narrator, but a handful, force the reader to grope in darkness.
Power has a sure hand throughout, sitting us inside the director’s office, then drawing us deeper and deeper, down and down, into a labyrinth of underground passages, heavy with ancestral memory.
As a bonus, there is also a poem, of which I will not elaborate. This feels like a window, cracked open by the author, providing, ever so slightly, a glimpse of the muse.

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Various (Editor: Parry, Robert) - Ghosts Of The Chit-Chat

Parry does an excellent job showcasing not only the bright names, but the lesser known, as well.
There is an overall history of the club, members, influences, quirks.
Also a biography for each of the eleven writers.
M.R. James and the brothers Benson are represented, and most horror readers will be familiar with their stories.
The draw for many will be those forgotten members.
H.R.W. Tatham’s “The Phonograph Bewitched” offers a vintage recording device that appears to record with a will of its own.
Maurice Baring has two haunted tales, a room for the night, and a religious artifact.
Gerald Warre Cornish perished too young in the Somme. An excerpt from his “Beneath The Surface” gives a painfully tantalizing glimpse of lost potential.
Kudos for Mr. Parry for researching and unearthing these gems; this must have been a labor of love.

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I’m reading Dune for the first time to prepare for the film’s release in October.

“Remember, the Force will be with you. Always.”

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jedi_bendu said:

I’m reading Dune for the first time to prepare for the film’s release in October.

I am currently halfway through Children of Dune.

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At the moment I’m reading The Color Out of Space by H.P. Lovecraft. It’s for a class, but I’m glad to be experiencing Lovecraft for the first time.

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Anakin Starkiller said:

At the moment I’m reading The Color Out of Space by H.P. Lovecraft. It’s for a class, but I’m glad to be experiencing Lovecraft for the first time.

Sounds like a wonderful class! Welcome to the wacky somewhat racist world of H.P. Lovecraft. Enjoy!

I’m just a simple man trying to make my way in the universe.

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I remember reading that the added bonus of Lovecraft’s works is that they’re readily available online since they are all public domain.

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Duffy, Steve - Finding Yourself In The Dark

Diverse assortment of hauntings and unmarked boundaries.
“Chambers Of The Heart” is from Olivia’s viewpoint. Perched uneasily at the edge of 40, looks beginning to fade, working another trifling job. Her employer finds himself in a spot of trouble, and she is caught.
Found footage, in this case, an old tape, reveal death dealings in “The Last House On Mullible Street.” Old men recall youthful indiscretions, the Blitz, and trespassing.
“The Clay Party” might best be appreciated by those who have a taste for the Donner Party.
“A Day At The Hotel Radium” sees the refugee arrive at a safe oasis, a shelter of serenity. This reads like a child’s fairy tale … up to a point.
Two or three stories are unresolved. Individuals caught in sea fog, cut off by the tide, displaced from the “normal” world, the busy normal world, still perceived in the distance.