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What are you reading? — Page 50

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I’m rereading Batman Knightfall

I’m just a simple man trying to make my way in the universe.

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JadedSkywalker said:

I started reading Brandon Sanderson’s Wheel of Time trilogy, and it immediately dawned on me he doesn’t use the same word style as Robert Jordan I was taken right out of the book.

Not sure if i’ll be able to finish them. He admits in the introduction he wasn’t going to be writing in Jordan’s style.

Sanderson does have a consistent style.

I’m currently reading the Steelheart trilogy after finishing the Mistborn trilogy for the second time and reading the first two books of the Starsight trilogy. After that I’ll be reading Elantris. In his books I’ve found that he never fails to construct decent plots around believable worldbuilding. The characters can sometimes be a bit flat, but it’s not the worst problem in the world.

You probably don’t recognize me because of the red arm.
Episode 9 Rewrite, The Starlight Project (Workprint V3 Released!) and ANH Technicolor Project (Released!)

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JadedSkywalker said:

Can someone recommend some science fiction or fantasy?

I haven’t read anything new in a couple decades in these genres beyond GRRM.

Once upon a time i used to read every new book my library brought in. Amazingly i was much more busy back then and still found more time to read than i do now.

Its easy to get comfortable and reread stuff you are familiar with. In Lieu of any such recommendations i’ve began re-reading Mary Stewart’s Merlin Trilogy and Le Morte D’Arthur. I never finished the Winchester version and i figure i might as well finish the second half of that. I’ve read the complete Caxton.

I’m very late to this, but two sci-fi books I read last year I really liked: Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood and The Dispossessed by Ursula K Le Guin. Oryx and Crake (definitely the more well-known of the two) chronicles a man’s life story before and after an apocalypse, heavy on the science and with some of the best worldbuilding in a novel I’ve experienced; it’s also morbid as hell and if you’re desperate to avoid anything that reminds you of the pandemic, I’d maybe give it a miss. The Dispossessed is a sci-fi book that FEELS more like fantasy, at least to me - in fact, I thought it was until Earth is mentioned near the end. In a solar system of two neighbouring, opposing planets, it follows Shevek - a galactically famous physicist - as he becomes the first man to travel to the other planet to spread his theories and open minds. He gets caught up in a political game, and the novel is packed with thoughtful political commentary - but it’s never obtrusive or dull. The Dispossessed is one of my favourite books now. There are other novels set in the same universe, but they’re all distinct and you don’t have to read those to understand this book.

“Remember, the Force will be with you. Always.”

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I dug out my Dolphin Edition of Fellowship of the Ring from 1970 from Ballantine Books. I forgot how long the introduction is. It takes forever even before you get to Bilbo’s birthday party.

I’m rereading because i just watched the first film. Wish there was a facsimile of the first edition text like their is for the Hobbit.

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JadedSkywalker said:

Can someone recommend some science fiction or fantasy?

I haven’t read anything new in a couple decades in these genres beyond GRRM.

Once upon a time i used to read every new book my library brought in. Amazingly i was much more busy back then and still found more time to read than i do now.

Its easy to get comfortable and reread stuff you are familiar with. In Lieu of any such recommendations i’ve began re-reading Mary Stewart’s Merlin Trilogy and Le Morte D’Arthur. I never finished the Winchester version and i figure i might as well finish the second half of that. I’ve read the complete Caxton.

Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation - Asimov
Snow Crash - Neal Stephenson
Lost Stars - Claudia Gray
The Expanse Series - James S. A. Corey

I’m currently reading The Expanse books, but I just got a copy of The Three Body Problem - Liu Cixin. Can’t wait to get started on it.

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Huxley, Aldous - Antic Hay

Bored with teaching, Theodore Gumbril resigns from the school in order to …
He’s not quite sure. Money would be nice, more rather than less.
Brainstorm flash, Theodore decides to make and market pneumatic pants, an inflatable bottom for bony arsed wearers.
This is the funniest line in the novel, along with marketing expert who knows every trick to convince distracted buyers that pneumatic pants are must-own accessories!
The novel itself is a prickly experience.
Set after the Great War (never mentioned), the main characters, once Bright Young Things, are aimless and adrift. Nothing seems to engage them.
They are affluent. No need of employment to distract their moods or occupy their time.
By and large, they ridicule and belittle others – friends and associates.
Few characters emerge as sympathetic, nor is there enough “character” in any to admire or despise.

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Spiess, Christian Heinrich - The Dwarf Of Westerbourg

Good knight Rudolph comes into his inheritance, which includes a magical dwarf who has been advising and serving the Westerbourg crest for centuries.
Rudolph is an earnest knight, more concerned with tournaments and conflicts, than romance.
The dwarf, Peter, gradually shifts his eye towards the fairer sex, those of pure innocence.
From then on, Rudolph steps down an ever steepening slope, pursuing and possessing the virtuous.
Maiden after maiden, each displacing the other in terms of unequaled beauty.
Time and again, Rudolph has moral arguments with himself, yet – to be honest dear reader – he has the resolve (and IQ) of a biscuit.
An incredibly funny book, roaring with adventures, swinging from macabre to preposterous.
Influential on Lewis’ “The Monk” and Radcliffe’s “The Mysteries Of Udolpho.”

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A friend is reading Much Ado About Nothing with me.

I’m just a simple man trying to make my way in the universe.

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I’ve never read that one. I’ve read Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, And Julius Caesar. And Henry the V.

Haven’t read a midsummer nights dream, the tempest, or Macbeth. Yet.

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JadedSkywalker said:

I’ve never read that one. I’ve read Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, And Julius Caesar. And Henry the V.

Haven’t read a midsummer nights dream, the tempest, or Macbeth. Yet.

You should read King Leer

I’m just a simple man trying to make my way in the universe.

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Just bought Jonathan Rinzler’s definitive books for A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back as they were on sale for Star Wars Day! Super excited to go even deeper into the films and learn a thing or two! Hopefully I can add Return of the Jedi in the not too distant future as well.

"Pleasure’s fun. It’s great, but you can’t keep it going forever; just accept the fact that it’s here and it’s gone, and maybe then again, it will come back, and you’ll get to do it again. Joy lasts forever. Pleasure is purely self-centered. It’s all about your pleasure: it’s about you. It’s a selfish, self-centered emotion, that is created by a self-centered motive of greed. Joy is compassion. Joy is giving yourself to somebody else, or something else. And it’s a kind of thing that is, in its subtlety and lowness, much more powerful than pleasure. You get hung up on pleasure; you’re doomed. If you pursue joy; you will find everlasting happiness.” - George Lucas

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The making of Star Wars wouldn’t have been possible without the work of Charley Lippincott and his contemporary interviews which he was never paid royalties for on the sale of that book, not when Lucas owned Lucasfilm and not under Disney. A man written out of the history of Star Wars much like Marcia Lucas and Gary Kurtz.

RIP Charley.

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Curran, Tim - Worm

The first few chapters, we are briefly introduced to the meals … oops … characters.
The small residential burg is shaken by quakes, the ground boils open, and slippery, rank black ooze spreads.
Worse, this occurs within homes, as sinks, drains and toilets belch forth the subterranean vomit.
Mr. Curran has tapped into a childhood fear. Going to the toilet in the middle of the night, when creatures, horrible creatures, wriggle in the shadowy bowl.

Somewhere, James Herbert is going, “Way to go, mate.”

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Crowther, Peter - The Longest Single Note

Generous, very generous collection from Mr. Crow, who bears a hybrid of UK and USA styles.
Most of the stories are very good, honing in on isolated and disenfranchised souls, watching death in action.
“Gallagher’s Arm” is overtly Lovecraftian, in setting, in tone, in subject matter.
In “Home Comforts,” father and daughter drive cross country, post epidemic, scrounging food and fuel where they can, yet ever searching for the villain who traumatized the girl.
“Shatsi” observes the kidnapper, actually cat-napper, a smooth planner who knows the score. A hard boiled alley of the deluded.
“Too Short A Death,” one of the longer tales, is haunting. The reporter (fan) tries to find the obscure poet (Weldon Kees) who had vanished mysteriously.
In “Forest Plains,” a tribal member rolls easy into the sleepy backwater. The town is dying, bypassed by the Inter-State highway. Not that all dead, or dying, are at peace.
Mine is a Cemetery Dance edition, published in the 1990’s, when that publisher boasted an impressive run of authors and titles.

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Just added these books. I’m really looking forward to delving in and gaining a greater cultural understanding of traditions in old Russia through art and folklore. It helps they won’t be misinformed accounts as they were both published in Russia.

"Pleasure’s fun. It’s great, but you can’t keep it going forever; just accept the fact that it’s here and it’s gone, and maybe then again, it will come back, and you’ll get to do it again. Joy lasts forever. Pleasure is purely self-centered. It’s all about your pleasure: it’s about you. It’s a selfish, self-centered emotion, that is created by a self-centered motive of greed. Joy is compassion. Joy is giving yourself to somebody else, or something else. And it’s a kind of thing that is, in its subtlety and lowness, much more powerful than pleasure. You get hung up on pleasure; you’re doomed. If you pursue joy; you will find everlasting happiness.” - George Lucas

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McCammon, Robert - The Providence Rider

Recent installment of novels following Matthew Corbett, and direct sequel to Mister Slaughter.
This time out, “problem solver” Corbett was kidnapped by arch nemesis Professor Fell.
Settings shift from New York in Winter, to the high seas of the Atlantic, into Bermuda. Time - 1703 - 1704.
Cutthroats, smugglers, blackmailers, arms peddlers, and the embrace of the octopus, hem Corbett from all sides in Fell’s palace of traps.
As always with McCammon, the book was well crafted, with a wonderful eye for 1704. Queen Anne sat on the English throne, New York was still a colony, recently taken from the Dutch. Slaves and servants were commonplace.
Nice entertaining read, and no, one does not have to read the previous books, of which there are several.