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Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles) — Page 62

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I am looking for the English subtitles for ROTJ DE. Can you please send them to me? Thanks!

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Hi! Where can I get the subtitle files of the three movies, I need American Spanish and Castillan, and if it’s possible, where can I get the dub audio for the three movies as well. Thanks!

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please please help… the subs on the first movie was awesome, but already had to show the ruined version of the empire strikes back for some family members, because i just could not get subs for it… 😦 would love subs for the third one…

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Hello there! Can someone provide me these tracks:
TRACK 2) 2.0 DTS-HD-MA [English] (1977 35mm stereo mix)
TRACK 2) 2.0 DTS-HD-MA [English] (1980 mix)
TRACK 2) 2.0 DTS-HD-MA [English] (1983 mix)

Note: I downloaded the ACVHD version of the three movies I want those tracks, I know I can extract from the mkv but that’s a big file. Thanks!

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Unless I’m missing something, I only see 1 of those tracks on the mkv.

Here’s what I see with MKVToolNix:
Audio Tracks

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This is not the right thread for English audio.

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)

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 (Edited)

Hey, can you please shoot me a PM containing the Italian subtitles (.srt file for the .mkv) for The Empire Strikes Back, DE v2.0 and Return of the Jedi, DE v2.5? Thanks!

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Bluto said:

Just some observations from an interested reader:

The slightly dimmer white and increased transparency of the new subtitles look great to me.
However, I’m not as keen on the narrower font. It looks somewhat squashed to me.

Bluto

Just to update you on the progress on this: This may be addressed in the final version after all. After repeating the size testing, it looks like the increased weight at the same height makes the subtitles look too big even in my crappy small screen/big distance worst-case test scenario. So, keeping the weight the same, you don’t have to reduce the font size very much before the “lines get too wide” problem goes away, and then you don’t need a semicondensed font to work around that anymore.

Small adjustments make a big difference here. Consider the subtitles a long skinny rectangle near the bottom of the screen. If you reduce the font size, say, 10%, that doesn’t change the height of the box very much in absolute terms, but it dramatically reduces the width of the box. That’s kinda what I’m tinkering with here.

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)

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 (Edited)

Okay, here’s some more current screenshots of the new no-longer-condensed font. Current version 10.0 is on top, new version 10.1-beta is on bottom, and they are all clickable for larger image. You’ll see that the new font is actually smaller in terms of point size but at the same time still thicker in terms of stroke width. I did check this out on my classic “small TV, sitting far away” test, and it still checked out as comfortably readable, so I think it’s close to an even trade. Actually I think the previous size was a little extra large to assist with the DVD format, which used to be more of a thing around here, but the new one works well on DVD downscales too. There are still the font scaling scripts for less common cases where larger or smaller text would be preferable.

The SDH subtitles have also undergone a couple of revisions. I’d initially done them with a black outline and the black background, but that was too distracting. I finally just made the black background a little more opaque and dropped the outline.

Project Threepio: Spanish double-dialogue
Project Threepio: Spanish double-dialogue

Project Threepio: SDH subtitles
Project Threepio: SDH subtitles

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)

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This is still Noto Sans, correct? I really like the new version, much more readable and feels more natural (insofar as a subtitle can feel natural) to me. Excellent choice!

a trolling bantha

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Yes, still Noto Sans, Semibold. Trying hard to stick with that family for consistency between scripts (Cantonese mixes Latin and Chinese characters like crazy, etc), but we’ll see about that 😉

At this point it’s a race between Harmy and my Arabic translator as to when something big enough happens to trigger a new release.

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)

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I just posted a new thread in the Technical HOWTO forum about torrents, as it may apply to distributing the next version of Project Threepio. Anyone with expertise in the matter please consider adding your input, because this is new territory for me. FTP I get. BitTorrent I do not.

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)

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Do you have the pt-pt subtitles for the first movie?

It’s not available in Project Threepio v6.2

thx in advance

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PM sent. European Portuguese was a more recent addition, so it’s only in the more current versions.

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)

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Hello,
I would like to get the subtitle files for Finnish, please.

My youngest is 11 and she might still be resposive to the magic of The Movie. But subtitles are a must for her.
As they were for me when I saw it in the movies when I was 10, a long time ago…

Best Regards, and big thanks for a good work!

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I need Japanese subtitles if possible, please. At least for the first movie.

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CatBus said:

There’s a pretty detailed README file included with the project files. That part would be covered in the “Project Threepio’s file naming convention” section.

SW-eng-native.sup: A set of subtitles that cover what most people would want.
SW-eng-sdh-native.sup: A set of subtitles that include SDH (deaf & hard of hearing) audio cues.
SW-eng-alien-35mm.sup: Greedo’s subtitles, for use with preservations that don’t have burnt-in Greedo subs.
SW-eng-match-35mm.sup: A set of subtitles for the rest of the film, designed to look like Greedo’s subs (similar font & style).

SW means Star Wars, ESB means Empire, ROTJ means Jedi. I’d recommend against using SRT files unless you have no other option.

So, in short, -eng-native is probably what you’re looking for, unless you want SDH cues.

quoting this as i found it useful.

would it be fair to say that for non english languages, the -full-compat would be the prefered SRT subtitle, followed by just -full if there is no -full-compat file?

Also, the readme file is confusing me on this part:

native: onscreen text is not subtitled, designed for video with burnt-in alien subtitles
nocrawl: onscreen text is not subtitled, designed for video without burnt-in alien subtitles

those descriptions don’t seem right to me, or else i am just confused…

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The -compat business is really baffling to me. I think you’re right, it just blows me away that media players have all standardized on a completely effed-up SRT file format for RTL languages. I saw a media player that handled correctly-formatted RTL subtitles once, and, sure enough, there was a bug filed that it didn’t work with the vast majority of RTL SRT subtitles already in existence.

On the latter issue, the description is confusing but correct (I may work on that). “native” means Greedo’s lines aren’t included in the SRT/SUP file, because they are expected to be burnt-in on the video. “nocrawl” means the translated crawl is not included, but Greedo’s lines are, if the video doesn’t burn in Greedo’s lines. For example, if the English version of the video doesn’t have Greedo subs, then you’d want the Greedo lines in your SRT/SUP files but you would still not want the English crawl text in your subtitles, because that’s still in the video. Unless you’ve got the German Krieg der Sterne video, in which case you want -eng-full. It’s a bit of a mess, but that’s what I get for trying to cover every possibility.

EDITED TO ADD:

For clarification on what the difference is between -compat files and normal files… if you run Windows, Notepad is a great artifact of primitive Unicode text technology. In Notepad, if you open a -full RTL file, it will look all messed up (primarily punctuation on the wrong side of the text). If you open the -compat file, it looks fine. But try that using some more modern Unicode text-handler (a browser, word processor, whatever), and the situation is exactly reversed.

A crazier example is if you open a -compat file in Notepad (which looks fine), and then copy and paste into a browser – the characters get all jumbled around in the paste operation, because they were never in the right order to begin with, Notepad just displayed the jumbled characters in a jumbled way that made them look like they were okay when they actually weren’t.

Argh! Unicode solved this problem decades ago!

Anyway, all of this seems a little academic until you consider that I have scripts that read the SRT files and render images based on that text, and I can’t afford to be messing around with scrambled text. And I copy the subtitles and paste them into Google translate all the time, to make sure I’m working on the right line, where, again, text scrambling is unhelpful.

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)

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Is this text clearer?

native: onscreen text is not subtitled, designed to accompany video that already includes burnt-in alien subtitles
nocrawl: onscreen text is not subtitled, designed to accompany video that does not include burnt-in alien subtitles

Project Threepio (Star Wars OOT subtitles)