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Pre-MaQuarrie "illustrations" for Star Wars (NASA, Flash Gordon, Frazetta, etc.)

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I realize that this is a somewhat bizarre thing to ask about, but it is technically SW related and I don’t really know of anywhere else to ask about this sort of thing.

So I just started reading J. W. Rinzler’s ‘The Making of Star Wars’, mostly with the intent of learning as much as I could about the early script drafts (I’ve been strangely obsessed with these lately) and I came across something interesting.
When describing Lucas’ creative process in writing the first two of drafts Rinzler mentions several pictures being attached to the scripts. Keep in mind that this is before Lucas had hired McQuarrie or any of the other artists to illustrate his ideas, so these images were not made for Star Wars.
The thing that’s bothering me is that Rinzler has decided to not show any of these photos in the book, and instead merely opted to describe them. (I guess this might be due to some copyright issues, but the book has several Flash Gordon pictures, old movie posters, etc.)

Here’s his descriptions of the photos;

-In reference to the story treatment, in May 1973
“To give United Artists an idea of what kind of visuals he had in mind, Lucas had attached ten images to the treatment:
four NASA photos (astronauts in space, sattelites, spaceships with peculiarly shaped wings); a photo of US army amphibious tanks; and five fantasy illustrations, consisting of a skull-faced , muscular man holding a dead woman, pietà-like; a sci-fantasy hero, crouching and holding a blaster; a swarm of warriors fighting a giant furry creature; another sci-fi hero standing next to a futuristic vehicle; and a goggle-faced alien staring out at the viewer.”

-In reference to the rough draft, May 1974
“Lucas’s bound copy of this draft has a mock-up cover with Flash Gordon-like characters blasting each other;
one is on a jet hover-pad, while the other protects a girl.
Interspersed in the pages are occasional illustrations pulled from comic books:
Han Solo resembles a swamp creature, while 'Captain Starkiller* (Annikin) is clearly a Buck Rogers type.”
(This “swamp creature” is probably a reference to The Swamp Thing comic series which was first published in 1972. It’s also worth noting that the Dark Horse comics adaptation of the rough draft has an alien Han Solo that looks almost identical to the Swamp Thing.)

-In reference to the second draft, January 28 1975
“A copy in the Lucasfilm Archives features a red cover with a Frank Frazetta-like illustration of a man holding a sword with an adoring, voluptuous woman wrapped around his leg.”
(I’m guessing this was the inspiration for the Jung/Hildebrant posters.)
EDIT: I actually found this one (image posted below).

Does anyone know if any of these pictures have ever been published in relation to Star Wars?
Maybe there’s some other BTS books that choose to include these pictures.

(I highly doubt that it would be possible to find these pictures simply based on these descriptions.)

EDIT:
Second draft (January 28, 1975) cover.

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Let us not forget the great unsung hero, Colin Cantwell. He was there at the beginning and helped inspire the look and feel of Star Wars. He pioneered the technique of kitbashing and was hired by George to design prototypes of the ships while he was still working on the first drafts.

The likely reason Rinzler didn’t include these in the book is that they’re not in the Lucasfilm archive. Cantwell still owns all of his original work for the film.

Here’s a great video interview series with Colin Cantwell about his work and history with the industry.

The Star Wars portion starts in Part 3. Lots of amazing stuff that you’ll find nowhere else, including artwork.

Help back OMNO!

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Tobar said:

Let us not forget the great unsung hero, Colin Cantwell. He was there at the beginning and helped inspire the look and feel of Star Wars. He pioneered the technique of kitbashing and was hired by George to design prototypes of the ships while he was still working on the first drafts.

The likely reason Rinzler didn’t include these in the book is that they’re not in the Lucasfilm archive. Cantwell still owns all of his original work for the film.

Here’s a great video interview series with Colin Cantwell about his work and history with the industry.

The Star Wars portion starts in Part 3. Lots of amazing stuff that you’ll find nowhere else, including artwork.

Yeah, I can definetely see how these might have been some of the pictures Rinzler was talking about
http://kitbashed.com/blog/colin-cantwells-concept-art

(EDIT: are these actual SW concept art by Cantwell?)


The “sci-fi hero standing next to a futuristic vehicle” could be a reference to a Buck Roger’s photo. In of one the videos you linked to Cantwell mentions how this vehicle (picture below) was based on a Buck Roger’s image Lucas showed him.

Kitbashed.com also suggests that this Flash Gordon comic from 1971 (image below) was an inspiration for Luke’s speeder. Although it doesn’t match the description of the attached images that Rinzler mentions, this could definitely have been an inspiration at some later point in the production.

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Tobar said:

ZkinandBonez said:

(EDIT: are these actual SW concept art by Cantwell?)

Yes.

Right.
Well that at least gives me some insight to the visuals of the first draft, but these NASA spaceships with the weird wings still remain a mystery.

EDIT:
I actually found one of the images described in the book on the webpage with the interviews that you linked to. Although you sent me the link several hours ago, I decided to look at it again and scroll down past the videos to see if there was something else interesting written, and after having scrolled past a whole lot of photos, there it was, Lucas’ red Frazetta-like cover for first draft.
It’s quite rare apparently, even the guy who interview Cantwell seemed surprised, and wrote that he couldn’t even find it elsewhere on the internet via a Google Image Search. And who actually made it is still a mystery.
(I’ve added the cover art to the first post btw)

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There were many designs considered for the Space Shuttle in the early 70’s, that might be what is being referred to.
http://www.armaghplanet.com/blog/10-shuttles-which-never-flew.html

NASA had also been experimenting with wingless aircraft for many years, the most famous of which became Col. Steve Austin’s ill fated craft in The Six Million Dollar Man.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Northrop_M2-F2.jpg

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Where were you in '77?