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Original Triogy Soundtrack 4 CD set

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 (Edited)

Is there any listing of the track lists in seqential order for each Cd?

 I've treid splicing it myself, but I get lost at the end of A New Hope.

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I'm not sure I understand the question-

Are you talking about the 'Star Wars Anthology' CD set from the early 1990s?

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Why don't you use the .cue file to split it?

Fez: I am so excited about Star Whores.
Hyde: Fezzy, man, it's Star Wars.
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$20 is a decent price, I think, especially considering that it's OOP, but check eBay to see what they're selling for there.

The thing I love about that set is that it came with a nice book and has the original music from Jedi (lapti nek, ewok celebration) plus a few other bits and pieces that weren't included on the 1997 2-disc SE sets (although, the 2-disc sets also have a lot of unreleased stuff that wasn't in the anthology, too). If you have all the 2-disc sets and the Anthology, you've pretty much got a complete set of everything that was ever released officially.

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Knightmessenger said:

I saw one of those early 90's trilogy soundtrack sets used at an FYE. It looked tempting but I passed. I think it was about $20, was that a good price?

 

 It is the best value you get the most of the whole score better than the Album releases and the IV - VI 1995

editions I think.

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I have the 97 Star Wars soundtrack. I like that it is complete and does not have any of the added music for the new scenes. Even where the Jabba scene goes it just fades like in the original version.

Does the 97 Empire soundtrack have any of the tracked music spliced in from the new scenes? The part where we see Vader land his shuttle in the RotJ outtake sounds really bad, it's an abrupt change in the music and repeats the score of where Vader says "No, I am your father."

Those added scenes to Empire don't get mentioned a lot but I think they are among the worst additions to the trilogy. They show that George has no idea of pacing or story structure or that a scene which on it's own might look cool can make a movie worse. It totally ruins the moment with Luke's escape from the bottom of Cloud City. The Jabba scene in ANH is stupid but it doesn't interrupt nearly as emotionally involving of scenes as the Vader shuttle ones do.

And are the versions of Lapti Nek and Yub Nub in the earlier cd's the same as they sound in the movie? The only isolated versions (Deleted Magic menu audio) I've heard are different.

Take back the trilogy. Execute Order '77

http://www.youtube.com/user/Knightmessenger

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Knightmessenger said:

 

And are the versions of Lapti Nek and Yub Nub in the earlier cd's the same as they sound in the movie? The only isolated versions (Deleted Magic menu audio) I've heard are different.

The Lapti Nek on the boxed set CD is the same that was on the original soundtrack LP from 1983- meaning that it is not the same as the movie version. I don't think the movie version was ever released officially.

I believe there are 2 different versions of the Ewok Celebration song included, though- the '83 LP version and the film version.

 

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That is because Lapti Nek film version is lost forever except for as it appears in the film itself.  The music master tape could not be found anywhere in the Lucas archives.

It may have been borowed Like the Master for the Jabba scene during the making of From Star Wars to Jedi.  And now since both are permanently Lost. 

Lapti Nek exists only with the film.  Been so long since i have seen Return of the Jedi, i believe the problem is Jabbas and Oolas Huttese dialogue is mixed in with the music.

I am sure fans and bootleggers have tried making a clean version of this from this souce and given up in despair.

The only thing That could be done if Lucasfilm cared was to re-record it from the original music sheets, that is if the artist who sang it is still even available.  But they did not do so because they now had Jedi Rocks the only piece of Music written for the special editions not by John Williams.

Williams wrote that new end piece in Jedi that goes "ya ya ya ya ya."  Instead of Yub NUB, or yub yub.

There was also an LP with the dance version and Disco version of lapti nek, as well as the album version.  That with the film version means their are 4 versions of the song.

There are 2 versions of Leia Breaks the News, and 2 Versions of Funeral Pyre for a Jedi.  2 versions of The ewok Celebration song and 2 versions of the forrest battle.  The ewok Forrest battle not used in the movie is the concert suite version.

 

Even if you have the anthology and the rca or sony versions you still don't have all the music, but close to it.  Much closer to a complete scores than say for all 4 indiana jones scores released recently which are missing hours of material in that boxset. The prequels scores are also incomplete much more so than the original trilogy music.  The original trilogy music is a lot more played and popular and has way more re-recordings than the prequels.  The Public consensus seems to be that the prequel scores were not as good.

In fact the only Modern Scores that come close to dupliacted the quality of the oot scores are those by Howard Shore for the Lord of the Rings Trilogy.  Not sure everyone would agree with that, or that the movie trilogy of lord of the rings is the modern equivalent of the immortal trilogy that star wars once was.  Before the dark times, before the gout.

“Always loved Vader’s wordless self sacrifice. Another shitty, clueless, revision like Greedo and young Anakin’s ghost. What a fucking shame.” -Simon Pegg.

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Knightmessenger said:

Does the 97 Empire soundtrack have any of the tracked music spliced in from the new scenes? The part where we see Vader land his shuttle in the RotJ outtake sounds really bad, it's an abrupt change in the music and repeats the score of where Vader says "No, I am your father."

Those added scenes to Empire don't get mentioned a lot but I think they are among the worst additions to the trilogy. They show that George has no idea of pacing or story structure or that a scene which on it's own might look cool can make a movie worse. It totally ruins the moment with Luke's escape from the bottom of Cloud City. The Jabba scene in ANH is stupid but it doesn't interrupt nearly as emotionally involving of scenes as the Vader shuttle ones do.

No, the Empire CD is intact.  Just like its predecessor, it includes the score as is, including plenty of deleted music.  Interestingly, I first heard this deleted music as part of the score of the N64 Shadows of the Empire.  I'm referring to the tune (un)used for Echo Base being the music in the file select screen.  When I first heard the soundtrack, it gave me quite a shock.

And, hey, I've gone on record as stating the very same thing.  I think those changes in Empire are the absolute worst of the entire special edition, in some ways even worse than Jabba and Hayden (yes, Hayden).  Hayden as Vader is ridiculous and disrespectful (and, most importantly, confusing if you haven't seen the prequels), but it doesn't change the pacing of the film.  The Jabba scene kills the pacing, but it's not nearly as damning as interrupting the climax of the movie for a pointless shuttle ride.  So, yeah, I'm right there with you.

There is no lingerie in space...

C3PX said: Gaffer is like that hot girl in high school that you think you have a chance with even though she is way out of your league because she is sweet and not a stuck up bitch who pretends you don't exist... then one day you spot her making out with some skinny twerp, only on second glance you realize it is the goth girl who always sits in the back of class; at that moment it dawns on you why she is never seen hanging off the arm of any of the jocks... and you realize, damn, she really is unobtainable after all. Not that that is going to stop you from dreaming... Only in this case, Gaffer is actually a guy.

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Yeah and Vader magically Lands on death star II that has not been built yet and Jejjerodd greets him.  When he was supposed to land on his star destroyer,lol .

A lazy re-used footage from Return of the Jedi that not only adds needless information, but destroys the pacing of the scene.  Even the new James Earl Jones Dialogue "Alert my Star Destroyer to prepare for my arrival"  is not as good and chillingly delivered as the pissed off Vader in "bring my shuttle"

I mean its almost as laughable as "noooooooooooooo!"

or this liitle exhange in the 2004 cut of empire:

Emperor " i have no doubt the young rebel who destroyed the death star is the offspring of Anakin skywalker"  Vader "How is that Possible" lol

To me the worst change of all in Empire is T. Morrison redub of paul wingreen as boba fett's voice.  Seriously i wanted to smash something.

I guess we should be glad Lucas did not have Hayden redub Mark Hamills lines.  I would hate to give uncle George any more of his brilliant ideas for his extra extra super special special editions for Blu Ray.  Next thing he will have Han Solo have a walkie talkie instead of a gun, and replace chewbacca with Jar Jar.

In that version Greedo will shoot first with his walkie talkie and miss and Han Solo will shoot second and greedo will be stunned by the walkie talkie. 

 

“Always loved Vader’s wordless self sacrifice. Another shitty, clueless, revision like Greedo and young Anakin’s ghost. What a fucking shame.” -Simon Pegg.

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google:

www.jw-music.net

elvisjones2000

 

and I ve made a track list in chronological order, but i dont know where it is, i look for it...

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skyjedi2005 said:

Even if you have the anthology and the rca or sony versions you still don't have all the music, but close to it.  

 

The single-disc Star Wars Trilogy CD recorded by the Utah Symphony is also a must for SW-soundtrack completists. It has the full Jabba the Hutt concert suite, which the anthology and rca/sony releases do not.

http://www.amazon.com/Star-Wars-Trilogy-Strikes-Re-recording/dp/B00000153G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1228941375&sr=1-1

John Williams also recorded a version for the Skywalker Symphony CD- but it was not as good, IMO.

 

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    (This from The Unoffical John Williams Home Page)

    PHASE ONE
    Episode IV: A New Hope

    Finalized 12/6/98
    Version 2.0 created 6/16/99

 

As we mentioned earlier, the original soundtrack to Star Wars was first released on 20th Century Records as a double album set (as well as on 8-track and cassette). When RSO Records acquired the soundtrack rights from 20th Century, it was also released on CD as two discs, and later re-issued as part of the Fox Scores box set and the RCA Victor SE CDs.

Abbreviations for this phase: OLP stands for original double album; FOXB stands for the Fox Scores/Arista 4-CD Box Set; RCA stands for the RCA Victor/BMG Classics "Special Edition" CDs. We are not counting the 8-track, cassette, and RSO CD releases since they are, in essence, the original double album content.

Here is the music listed in film order and where they can be found....

1. 20TH CENTURY FOX FANFARE (Track 1-RCA)--This recording, the only one on the soundtrack not composed by John Williams, is the famous Cinemascope fanfare written by Alfred Newman and recorded in 1954. In the film, this accompanies the Fox logo and the title "A Lucasfilm Ltd. Production" (in the SE, the Fox logo is followed by an updated version of the Lucasfilm logo). On the FOXB, we hear the 1980 re-recording (which we'll explain when we get to The Empire Strikes Back).

2. MAIN TITLE (Side 1, Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, Track 2, FOXB and RCA)--This is the first passage of the now-famous march known as "Luke's Theme", accompanied in the film by a scroll setting up the film's plot. After the scroll, the music quiets down, then rises up to the first dramatic reading of the Rebel Fanfare as we see the Rebel Blockade Runner Tantive IV being pursued by an Imperial Star Destroyer (this part of the cue is known on the RCA as "Rebel Blockade Runner"). A reprise of the Rebel Fanfare ends this cue, but on the OLP and FOXB this is followed by the end credit music (we'll explain its placement when we get to the end).

3. IMPERIAL ATTACK (Side 1, Track 2, OLP; Disc 1, Track 3, FOXB and RCA)--Accompanies the Empire's assault on the Rebel soldiers on the Tantive IV. After Darth Vader arrives, we are introduced to Ben's Theme and Princess Leia's Theme as Leia places the Death Star plans in the memory of R2-D2. When the Princess is taken for questioning, Darth Vader's theme is introduced, and as the track ends, we hear the Death Star motif for the first time. The OLP omits a ten-second section of music where the Rebels hold their fire prior to Stormtroopers breaking into the Blockade runner, as well as another ten-second segment of music where C-3PO searches for his counterpart (both sections were later restored for subsequent releases).

4. THE DESERT (Side 1, first part of Track 4, OLP; Disc 1, first part of track 4, FOXB and RCA)--This somber music underscores C-3PO's plight through the desert planet Tatooine's Dune Sea. On the RCA, this cue is known as "The Dune Sea Of Tatooine". On the OLP and FOXB, this is followed by "The Robot Auction".

5. THE LITTLE PEOPLE WORK (Side 2, Track 2, OLP; Disc 1, Track 5, FOXB; Disc 1, second part of track 4, RCA)--Jaunty theme music for the little Jawa creatures as they transport R2-D2 to their Sandcrawler. Trumpet, bassoon, and bending strings underscore a look at other robots inside the Jawa transport. On the RCA, this cue was called "Jawa Sandcrawler". The cue is presented as originally recorded, as it was shortened for the final film.

6. THE ROBOT AUCTION (Side 1, second part of Track 4, OLP; Disc 1, second part of Track 4, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 5, RCA)--The Jawa theme is reprised for the final time during the sequence where the robots are sold to Uncle Owen Lars and his nephew, Luke Skywalker. "Luke's Theme" is reprised as this cue ends...at least on the OLP and FOXB. The track on the RCA, re-titled "The Moisture Farm", concludes with a short coda where Luke and the robots make their way to the homestead's garage for repairs (this was not included in the OLP and FOXB).

7. THE PRINCESS APPEARS (Side 3, Track 5, OLP; Disc 1, track 6, FOXB and RCA)--This is a series of two cues, the first underscoring the title sequence where the holographic image of Princess Leia appears to Luke and the robots, set to "Princess Leia's Theme". [On the RCA, this first part was called "The Hologram"]. The second takes place right after Luke's midday meal as he gazes at the sunset of Tatooine's twin moons, then returns some time later to find that R2-D2 has gone off in search of the mysterious Obi-Wan Kenobi. This portion, titled "Binary Sunset" on the RCA, was originally conceived with "Luke's Theme" in mind, but for the final film version presented here, it was replaced with "Ben's Theme" to reflect R2's plight of the old Jedi Master. We'll discuss the original version of this cue later.

8. THE LAND OF THE SANDPEOPLE (Side 3, Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, Track 7, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 7, RCA)--Opens with a fast version of "Luke's Theme", accompanied by a motif done on a bouncing horn (this introduction was deleted from the film due to post production editing). Pounding congas signify the presence of the Tusken Raiders (this section was shortened for the film), followed by a portion of music not included in the OLP and the FOXB. This portion opens with a quiet chord (which ends the first part of the cue, known on the RCA as "Landspeeder Search"), then strings suddenly can be heard as Luke senses trouble after he finds the wandering R2-D2 (this will open the second part, known on the RCA as "Attack Of The Sand People"). Percussion is heard as Luke is attacked by the Sand People. Quiet strings follow, with a motif that would later be heard on the next cue (which we'll discuss in a moment). "Ben's Theme" returns when the old Jedi Master appears, and that concludes this cue.

9. TALES OF A JEDI KNIGHT (Side 2, second part of Track 4, OLP; Disc 1, second part of track 9, FOXB; Disc 1, first part of Track 8, RCA)--First portion of the cue (known on the OLP and FOXB as the second part of the track "Inner City") underscores Luke meeting Ben Kenobi and finding a disassembled C-3P0). Second portion (found only on the RCA) underscores Ben telling Luke about Darth Vader (set to a reprise of "Darth Vader's Theme"). "Ben's Theme" returns when Obi-Wan first tells Luke about "the Force", something the youngster cannot see or even define.

10. LEARN ABOUT THE FORCE (Disc 1, second part of Track 8, RCA)--Presented in its entirety in both the film and the RCA, the first part of the cue underscores the return of the Princess' holographic image, now seen and heard in full as she outlines the danger that has befallen her. The second part underscores Luke's reluctance to join Ben Kenobi in his mission to Alderaan. The track ends with a strong rendition of the Death Star motif as we cut to the conference chambers in the film.

11. THE RETURN HOME (Side 3, Track 3, OLP; Disc 1, Track 8, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 9, RCA)--Somber piece opens with Luke and company discovering dead Jawas and discovering the Stormtroopers may have headed for Luke's homestead. The jaunty motif from "Land Of The Sandpeople" returns as Luke races toward his speeder, and a dramatic passage of "Ben's Theme" can be heard as Luke finds the remains of his aunt and uncle. We then segue into the Death Star (accompanied by Darth Vader's Theme, the Princess theme, and an original passage of threatening winds and strings) where Vader approaches the Princess' cell with a torture robot. The cue (known on the RCA as "Burning Homestead") will crossfade into the next track.

12. MOS EISLEY SPACEPORT (Disc 4, track 4, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 10, RCA)--Underscoring Luke's reluctant decision to join Obi-Wan Kenobi to Alderaan and learn about the ways of the Force, and their trip to Mos Eisley spaceport...but the group runs into stormtroopers along the way. The FOXB edition was entitled "A Hive Of Villany". In the SE film, this track was split into half, with tracked music from another cue which we'll discuss later.

13. CANTINA BAND (Disc 3, Track 5, OLP; Disc 4, Track 10, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 11, RCA)--One of two cues not performed by the London Symphony Orchestra that consist of music for the Mos Eisley Cantina. This was performed by hand-picked jazz musicians. "Cantina Band" is sort of a cross between Benny Goodman and New Age music. The OLP fades out before the end of the track, while the FOXB and RCA has a "cold closing" (in other words, does not fade out).

14. CANTINA BAND #2 (Disc 4, Track 12, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 12, RCA)--The second of two music cues for the Mos Eisley Cantina, again performed by jazz musicians, and again with the same Goodman-meets-New Age atmosphere.

15. INNER CITY (Disc 2, third part of Track 4, OLP; Disc 1, third part of track 9, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 2, RCA)--Underscores the latter part of the Mos Eisley sequence where Luke sells his landspeeder and we are introduced to the Millenium Falcon. A short mid-section of this was edited out of the OLP but restored later for subsequent re-issues. On the OLP and FOXB, this was the final section of what was called "Inner City". On the RCA, this cue was titled "The Millenium Falcon". In the SE film, this was interrupted briefly by a tracked cue to fit the restored Jabba the Hut scene (we'll talk about this tracked cue when we get to Return Of The Jedi).

16. BLASTING OFF (Side 3, second part of Track 2, OLP; Disc 1, second part of Track 10, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 2, RCA)--This cue, based largely on "Ben's Theme", accompanies the Falcon's departure from Tatooine and jump into hyperspace. The first 15 seconds of the cue were left out of the OLP and the FOXB, but restored for the later reissues. The RCA edition was re-titled "Imperial Cruiser Pursuit".

17. DESTRUCTION OF ALDERAAN (Disc 4, Track 5, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 3, RCA)--Dramatic original piece as we see the Death Star's destructive power demonstrated on Leia's home planet of Alderaan. Here John Williams avoids any of the usual themes and goes for complete originality in this cue.

18. THE DEATH STAR (Side 2, first part of track 4, OLP; Disc 1, first part of track 9, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 4, RCA)--Underscores the Falcon being pulled into the Death Star by the planet-like space station's tractor beam. The motif heard in the previous "Destruction Of Alderaan" cue is present, followed by a march-type rendition of the "Rebel Fanfare". The working title on the cue sheet was "Is It A Bird?". On the OLP and FOXB, this was the first portion of the cue "Inner City".

19. THE STORMTROOPERS (Disc 2, second part of track 4, RCA)--Luke and company's adventures on the Death Star begin with this cue as both Han and Luke disguise themselves as Stormtroopers to gain access to the space station's computer terminal.

20. MOUSE ROBOT (Side 3, first part of Track 2, OLP; Disc 1, first part of track 10, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 5, RCA)--Cue accompanying the wookie Chewbacca being transported to the detention block under a ruse opens with Chewie scaring off a mouse robot (hence the cue's title). "Luke's Theme" is reprised as Han tries to lock the binders on Chewie. There is a period of quiet, then the music builds which immediately leads to the next cue. The RCA edition is re-titled "Wookie Prisoner". In the SE film, a portion of this cue can be heard to fit the extended scenes on Tatooine as the Stormtroopers search for the missing robots.

21. DETENTION BLOCK AMBUSH (Side 4, first part of Track 1, OLP: Disc 1, first part of Track 15, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 5, RCA)--Tense action cue as Luke, Han, and Chewie overtake the Imperial officers in the detention block, set to a majestic version of "Luke's Theme". After Han has disabled the communications system, the "Rebel Fanfare" is heard, followed by a brief rendition of "Princess Leia's Theme" as Luke finds the Princess in her cell. On the OLP and FOXB, this was the first portion of the track "The Last Battle".

22. SHOOTOUT IN THE CELL BAY (Side 2, first part of Track 3, OLP; Disc 1, first part of Track 11, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 6, RCA)--Another fast action cue, this one underscoring the title scene, Luke, Leia, Han and Chewie vs. Stormtroopers who have shot their way through the cell bay. The first chord of this cue was not heard in the actual film. On the OLP and FOXB, this was the first part of what was titled "Rescue Of The Princess". However, on the FOXB, an alternate cue was used (see "Alternate Cues" section).

23. DIANOGA (Side 3, second part of Track 4, OLP; Disc 1, second part of Track 12, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 6, RCA)--This cue was to have been heard in the film during the sequence in the trash compactor where a snake-like creature called the Dianoga attacks Luke. Shades of the cue that comes after this can be heard here. George Lucas felt that the scene would play better without music, however the SE film uses this music to much greater advantage in the extended Mos Eisley sequences (this would come in the middle of the "Mos Eisley Spaceport" cue). The OLP and FOXB editions marked the second portion of what was entitled "The Walls Converge".

24. THE TRASH COMPACTOR (Side 3, first part of Track 4, OLP; Disc 1, first part of Track 12, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 7, RCA)--The bulk of this cue, underscoring the walls of the trash compactor closing in on our heroes, relies on originality (although the climbing figure construction was heard on the previous "Dianoga" cue). A hint of "Darth Vader's Theme" can be heard when the droids make their way out of the control room, talking their way out of the sight of the Stormtroopers in the process. The climbing music returns, builds, then suddenly stops. The first 40 seconds of this cue was not heard in the film, but the final chord can only be heard on the RCA. On the OLP and FOXB, this was the first section of what was called "The Walls Converge".

25. THE TRACTOR BEAM (Side 4, second part of Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, second part of Track 15, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 8, RCA)--Quiet cue accompanying Ben Kenobi releasing the tractor beam. "Luke's Theme" can be heard when we see a glimpse of the Millenium Falcon, but then goes into a nervous passage of violins as Han and Chewie encounter Stormtroopers. On the OLP and FOXB, this was the second portion of the track "The Last Battle". This cue will immediately lead to the next track.

26. CHASM CROSSFIRE (Side 2, second part of Track 3, OLP; Disc 1, second part of Track 11, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 9, RCA)--This piece of music owes a lot to the swashbuckling scores of the 1930s through 1950s. The Imperial motif (heard earlier in "Imperial Attack") is done at a slower tempo than before as Han and Chewie try to escape the Stormtroopers, then a majestic swashbuckling arrangement of "Luke's Theme" underscores Luke and Leia's swing-across. There is a quiet passage of "Luke's Theme" when we next see Ben, but "Darth Vader's Theme" returns as Han and Chewie escape the Stormtroopers. A series of drum beats underscores Ben encountering Vader for the final time. The working title on the cue sheet was "The Swashbucklers". On the OLP and FOXB, this was the final portion of "Rescue Of The Princess".

27. BEN'S DEATH/TIE FIGHTER ATTACK (Side 2, Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, Track 13, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 10, RCA)--This is presented as one entire cue exactly as it plays in the film. It accompanies the death of Ben "Obi-Wan" Kenobi at the hands of his one-time student, Darth Vader, as well as the Century ship attack that follows. It opens with a quiet passage of "Ben's Theme", then goes into "Princess Leia's Theme" as Ben is killed and our heroes make their escape. The "TIE Fighter Attack" is based largely on the "Rebel Fanfare", with a rhythmic phrase as its main configuration. The first half of this cue on the RCA was entited "Ben Kenobi's Death".

28. STANDING BY (Disc 4, Track 15, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 11, RCA)--This is the first of three cues underscoring the final battle on the Death Star, as the Rebel spaceships make their way towards the space station. The Death Star motif is heard for the final time as the Rebels get past the magnetic field. On the RCA, this was the "Launch From The Fourth Moon" section of "The Battle Of Yavin".

29. X-WINGS DRAW FIRE (Side 4, third part of Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, third part of Track 15, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 11, RCA)--The second of three "last battle" cues underscoring the attack on the Death Star. On the OLP and FOXB, this was the third part of the track "The Last Battle", while the RCA is the "X-Wings Draw Fire" section of "The Battle Of Yavin".

30. USE THE FORCE (Side 4, fourth part of Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, fourth part of Track 15, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 11, RCA)--Final portion of the battle scene beginning from the point where an Rebel spaceship crashes into the Death Star's surface. It is now Luke's turn to try and destroy the Death Star. Here, "Luke's Theme" and "Ben's Theme" collide as the young starfighter eventually remembers the lessons of his late mentor . A crash of timpani marks the Death Star's destruction, and a passage of the "Rebel Fanfare" closes the track, which was the last portion of "The Last Battle" on the OLP and FOXB, and the "Use The Force" section of "The Battle Of Yavin" on the RCA.

31. THE THRONE ROOM/END TITLE (Side 4, Track 2, OLP; Disc 1, Track 16, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 12, RCA)--Underscores the final scenes of the film and presented in its entirety as it is in the film. A brass fanfare leads to a processional arrangement of "Ben's Theme" (according to the OLP's liner notes, it made as a fitting tribute to the late Jedi Master). Then it goes into Coronation-type music as the Rebels are presented their medals. "Luke's Theme" (as well as "Princess Leia's Theme") is reprised as the end credits roll. To give the original album the feeling of an overture, the "End Title" from the intro of "Luke's Theme" to the end is also presented as the second part of the "Main Title" track on both the OLP and FOXB. "The Throne Room" is also presented as the first part of Track 16 on the FOXB, but there it is followed by an alternate version of the "End Title" (see the "Alternate Cues" section).

ALTERNATE CUES

1. MAIN TITLE--There are no more than five takes of the film's main title that were recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra. All five of these can be heard at the 5:00 mark of Track 13 of Disc 1 of the RCA. This is explained only in the CD's liner notes, not on the jacket of the CD package itself. Take 16 is the historic first recording of the "Star Wars Theme". The wind section was toned down for Take 17, and portions of the last three takes (18, 19, and 20) made up what would become the final film version of the cue. However, only two of these takes were used for the FOXB. Disc 1, Track 2 used Take 19, while Disc 4, Track 2 used Take 20. Take 20 was also used for the radio adaptation of Star Wars. For the original 24-page read along book and record (released by Buena Vista Records in 1977), the second reprise of "Luke's Theme" with added brass in Take 18 was utilized after the narrator says "Let's Begin Now". You could count the 45 rpm single version of the theme as a sixth variant since it was edited to over 3 minutes. But please don't count Meco's more successful disco version as a seventh variant since it was entirely rerecorded.

2. IMPERIAL ATTACK--As presented on Disc 1, Track 3 of the FOXB, some of the accentuation of the beats in the opening section are markedly different than the final film version.

3. BINARY SUNSET--This second portion of what is commonly titled "The Princess Appears" has somewhat of a history. Originally, John Williams based this cue on "Luke's Theme". For the final film version, it was based on "Ben's Theme", but in this original recorded version found on Disc 1, Track 13 of the RCA, you can hear how Williams avoided using thematic material for something entirely original...and unusual, that is if all you've been used to hearing is the film version cue. The final chord of this is about the same as in the final film version.

4. RESCUE OF THE PRINCESS (section 1) (aka "Shootout In The Cell Bay")--Presented on Disc 1, first part of Track 11 on the FOXB, you can tell this is an alternate cue by listening closely to the end section, especially the final crashing of cymbals and timpani (underscoring the Rebels jumping into the trash compactor).

5. END TITLE-- Found on the FOXB as the second part of Disc 1, Track 2, and again on Track 16 of the same disc. Here, you can clearly hear the horn section out of tune (sounding a lot like a high school marching band) when it starts to play "Luke's Theme".

CONCERT ARRANGEMENTS

PRINCESS LEIA'S THEME (Side 1, Track 3, OLP; Disc 1, Track 14, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 1, RCA)--Straightforward presentation of Leia's theme, paying tribute to romantic music of the 19th Century. Holds up alright compared to the later "love themes" of the remaining two films of the trilogy.

 

Author
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    PHASE TWO
    Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back

    Finalized 12/12/98
    Version 2.0 created 6/16/99

The soundtrack to this 1980 sequel was originally released as a double album set on RSO Records, once again with its tracks placed out of sequence. Around this time, a promotional album was released with half the original album's content (this would later become the CD release). Much of its content was restored for the FOXB, while fully restored for the RCA. We won't count the Var?se Sarabande release (with Charles Gephardt and the National Philharmonic Orchestra), but we will count the actual film cues in order of presentation (some of these are actually hidden within the RCA's tracks themselves).

Abbreviations: Once again, as in phase one, OLP stands for the original double album; FOXB stands for the Fox Scores/Arista box set; RCA stands for the RCA Victor "Special Edition' release. We are not counting the cassette and 8-track versions of the original album as it is essentially the original album content. We are also not counting the abbreviated promotional album/CD release.

1. 20TH CENTURY FOX FANFARE (Disc 2, Track 1, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 1, RCA)--The famous Fox Cinemascope Fanfare, written in 1954 by Alfred Newman, was originally re-recorded in 1980 by John Williams and the London Symphony Orchestra for The Empire Strikes Back. This particular recording has been re-used in subsequent Fox films and score releases until 1994, when Bruce Broughton recorded yet another arrangement of the logo music. In any event, this version is presented here as it was in The Empire Strikes Back. Something to note: this 1980 re-recording was also used as the first track of the FOXB disc to Star Wars instead of the original 1954 one. It would be resurrected for the beginning of 1999's "Star Wars: Episode One--The Phantom Menace".

2. MAIN TITLE (Side 1, first part of Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, first part of Track 2, FOXB; Disc 1, first part of Track 2, RCA)--This re-introduces "Luke's Theme", and touching on the same arrangement as the main title in the earlier film, and again seen over the prologue scroll. This time around, however, there is no question there is only one version that has been represented in all Empire releases (except for the Var?se/NPO re-recording). On the OLP, this was part of the cue "Main Title (Star Wars)".

3. THE IMPERIAL PROBE (Disc 1, first part of Track 4, RCA)--The cue, as actually heard in the film and presented here on the RCA, was not what John Williams originally intended to use, for this is actually an alternate version of the cue where we see Imperial Probes launch into space (we'll talk about the original version of the Probe music later). For some strange reason, this is placed as the beginning of the RCA's Track 4 and out of the original context of both the album and its score. It is also one of two "hidden alternate cues" found on its Empire CD. The track , which like its original counterpart, introduces a new theme for Darth Vader (played on solo piccolo), ends at the 1:14 mark of the RCA and segues into...

4. THE ICE PLANET HOTH (Side 1, third portion of Track 1, OLP; Disc 2, third portion of Track 2, FOXB; Disc 1, third part of Track 2, RCA)--A lengthy cue intended to underscore the opening of the film from the point where Luke is on a re-con mission in the icy snow of Hoth to where Han sets out to find Luke. While reprising familiar themes it also introduces new ones, such as a new theme for Han and Leia first heard while Luke is contacting his Correlian friend. Bombastic percussion and strings accompany Luke being attacked by a Wampa Ice Creature, and from that point on this portion of the cue ends on the OLP, but on the FOXB and RCA we hear music unused in the film right to the point where Han says goodbye to Leia. Military music underscores Han arriving at the Rebel Base, and "Princess Leia's Theme" (from the first film) signals Leia's first Empire appearance and Han requesting leave of absence so he can settle his debts with Jabba the Hut. Music used in the film returns when Han says goodbye to Leia, and as Han and Leia argue we hear the first full presentation of the "Han and Leia" theme. We then cut to the droids, R2-D2 and C-3PO, accompanied by an introduction of a musical bridge that would serve as a mini-theme for the Droids, and later heard in the cue "Hyperspace". The remainder of this track (underscoring Han silencing 3PO and his intention to seek Luke using Tauntauns) went unused in the film. In fact, much of the Empire score went unused (we'll explain as we go along). However, the final chord of this cue can be heard in the original release version.

Now here's where documenting the remainder of the music in the "Star Wars Trilogy" becomes tricky...

5. LUKE'S RESCUE (Side 1, first portion of Track 4, OLP; Disc 2, Track 3, FOXB; Disc 1, first part of Track 3, RCA)--Luke, held hostage by the Wampa Ice Creature, uses the Force and his lightsaber to make good his escape. This dramatic cue re-introduces "Ben's Theme" as Luke draws his inner power, followed by a brief majestic reading of "Luke's Theme", and powerful strings as Luke kills the ice creature. From the point where Luke makes his way out of the cave, the remainder of this track is unused. The Rebel Fanfare (in transposed minor key form) accompanies Han seeking his friend. The "Hyperspace" bridge returns as R2-D2 uses his radar to locate Luke. As Luke collapses in the snow, majestic march music returns and rounds out the track. This cue is presented in edited form on the OLP as the first part of the track "The Heroics Of Luke And Han", while in its full version on both the FOXB and the RCA (the latter CD edition titled "The Wampa's Lair").

6. VISION OF OBI-WAN (Disc 1, second part of track 3, RCA)--Another track on the RCA which has some music unused in the film (in the case of this track, the first minute), but this cue begins at the 3:28 mark of the RCA's track 3, with a return to the Rebel base as Luke's friends look on in sadness. A French horn statement of "Ben's Theme" is heard as a delirious Luke sees a vision of his old mentor telling the young Jedi to seek further training from Yoda on the Dagobah system. A dramatic passage follows as Han finds Luke and forced to build up shelter for the night. This cue ends with a slow two-note horn phrase that develops into a fuller version of...

7. LUKE'S RESCUE (Side 3, first part of Track 3, OLP; Disc 2, Track 4, FOXB; Disc 1, third part of Track 3, RCA)--A rhythmic piece underscoring Luke and Han's rescue by snowspeeder group Rogue Flight. Almost the entire track is not heard in the film, save for an 18-second segment where Rogue Flight finds the frosted Rebels. The first part was tracked from "Hyperspace", while the last was tracked from "Luke's Escape". On the OLP, this was the first part of the cue "Rebels At Bay", while the RCA was titled "Snowspeeders Take Flight".

8. ABOARD THE EXECUTOR (Disc 1, second part of Track 4, RCA)--This was meant to underscore Han and Chewie battling an Imperial Probe, and the re-introduction of Darth Vader as he makes his plans for the Battle Of Hoth. The first half (totaling 2 minutes, 5 seconds) was not used in the film, although the first 50 seconds of "The Imperial March (Darth Vader's Theme)" replaced this when we cut to the Executor.

9. DRAWING THE BATTLE LINES/LEIA'S INSTRUCTIONS (Disc 4, Track 6, FOXB; Disc 1, first part of Track 5, RCA)--A long suite (entitled "The Battle Of Hoth" on the RCA) begins with this series of two cues (heard on the FOXB together as one piece), which the first underscores Luke's farewell to Chewbacca and Han, and Darth Vader's "finishing" of Admiral Ozzel (set to a strong opening passage of "The Imperial March"). The next cue is where Princess Leia outlines the plans for the coming battle, then an Ion Cannon fires several shots clearing the way for the first transport to get away. , this leads to a triumphant passage as Luke and the Rebels board the snowspeeders for the snow battle. On the RCA, this entire cue is called "Ion Cannon". This piece will lead directly to the next one...

10. THE BATTLE IN THE SNOW (Side 2, Track 5, OLP; Disc 2, Track 6, FOXB; Disc 1, second part of Track 5, RCA)--Intense cue underscoring the first part of the Snow Battle against Imperial Walkers, set to unusual orchestration involving, among others, grand pianos, piccolos, oboes, and a battery of eight percussion. No recurring thematic material is used, originality throughout. The grand piano introduction was not used in the actual film. The RCA was re-titled "Imperial Walkers", the second part of the "Battle Of Hoth" suite.

11. LUKE'S FIRST CRASH (Side 3, Track 3, OLP; Disc 2, Track 7, FOXB; Disc 1, third part of Track 5, RCA)--Picks up immediately where the previous cue left off, with Han and Leia beginning their escape from Hoth base, while the title scene during the snow battle occurs, followed by Luke attempting to destroy an Imperial Walker using blast charges. A brief passage of the "Hyperspace" bridge (where R2 is being lifted up into Luke's fighter) can be heard before the majestic music continues. A section of battle music that follows was left out of the OST, but restored for later releases. The cue ends with a passage of "The Imperial March" as the Walkers kill the Rebels and blast away Hoth's main generators. On the OLP, this was the second section of the cue "Rebels At Bay", while the RCA was re-titled "Beneath The AT-AT". This segues directly into the next piece...

12. THE REBELS ESCAPE AGAIN (Side 1, second part of Track 2, OLP; Disc 2, Track 8, FOXB; Disc 1, fourth part of Track 5, RCA)--Accompanies the Falcon's escape from Hoth. A brief reprise of Leia's theme can be heard before dramatic brass passages of "The Imperial March" signal the presence of the Dark Lord. "Han And Leia"'s theme is juxtaposed with that of Vader's march as the Falcon makes good its escape from Vader and his minions. On the OLP, this was the second portion of the cue "The Heroics Of Luke And Han", while the RCA was the final portion of "The Battle Of Hoth" suite called "Escape In The Millenium Falcon".

13. THE ASTEROID FIELD (Side 3, Track 1, OLP; Disc 2, Track 9, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 6, RCA)--Virtuoso is the word for this fast-paced cue whose scene it underscores speaks for itself. A brass melody soars as the four TIE fighters pursue the Falcon through the asteroids. The "Han and Leia" theme ends all of this, as our heroes make their way through a cave.

14. ARRIVAL ON DAGOBAH (Disc 4, Track 9, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 7, RCA)--This music picks up right where Luke's X-Wing crashing into planet Dagobah's swamp left off. Dark-toned music represents Luke and R2's exploration of the planet on which they have just landed. Dramatic undertones accompanies R2's encounter with a swamp. When R2 is rescued, the "Hyperspace" bridge returns briefly. We then cut to Vader's ship as we take a rare look at an unmasked Vader, underscored by Vader's march. The five-note slam ends the FOXB version, which was entitled "Crash Landing". This slam also was tracked in the scene earlier in the actual film where Han arrives at Hoth base. The RCA goes a bit further though, as we hear more Dagobah music (after an unscored scene in the cave), leading to a surprise ending where we first see Yoda, the Jedi Master Ben mentioned earlier in the movie.

15. LUKE'S NOCTURNAL VISITOR (Side 1, second part of Track 3, OLP; Disc 2, second part of Track 12, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 8, RCA)--This playful interpretation of "Yoda's Theme" was meant to underscore the scene where Luke encounters the Jedi Master. You can tell how this music fit right into that scene...if only the bulk of it had actually been used in the movie. Only the tail end of this (the second playful passage of "Yoda's Theme) made it into the final film. There is an alternate version of this cue, which we'll get into later in the "Alternate Cues" section. The OLP and the FOXB was the second part of a cue entitled "The Training Of A Jedi Knight".

16. HAN SOLO AND THE PRINCESS (Side 2, Track 4, OLP; Disc 2, Track 11, FOXB; Disc 1. Track 9, RCA)--This cue starts out as a straightforward presentation of "Han and Leia"'s theme as their ill-fated romance begins to develop while making repairs on the Millenium Falcon. The mood is broken however, by C-3PO's presence. We then segue into Darth Vader's ship Executor, where he is in communication with the Galactic Emperor. A quiet passage underscores this talk. A better title for this cue would have been, perhaps, "Han And Leia/Emperor's Discussion", but this cue is presented in its entirety both on the soundtracks and in the movie. It is not an album arrangement (as the track title would have you to believe). However, in 1995, conductor Paul Bateman introduced a new concert arrangment which was warmly welcomed.

17. JEDI MASTER REVEALED (Side 3, first part of Track 2, OLP; Disc 2, first part of Track 15, FOXB; Disc 1, first part of Track 10, RCA)--This music starts from the point where Luke says, "..we're wasting our time!" This is the cue where Yoda reveals to Luke his true identity as the legendary Jedi Master, and Luke reluctantly agrees to train under him. The melding of Ben's theme, Yoda's theme, and Luke's theme all come together as his adventures on Dagobah will begin to take shape. On the OLP and FOXB, this was the first portion of the cue "City In The Clouds".

18. MYNOCK CAVE (Side 1, fourth portion of Track 1, OLP; Disc 1, second part of Track 10, RCA)--Rhythmic cue underscores the Millenium Falcon's escape from what turns out to be the mouth of a space slug. The first minute and three seconds of this cue was not used in the film nor the OLP, but can be heard in its entirety on the RCA. Most of the unused opening was also used in the radio adaptation of Empire. On the OLP, this was the final portion of the "Main Title (Star Wars)" track.

19. THE TRAINING OF A JEDI KNIGHT (Side 1, first part of Track 3, OLP; Disc 2, first part of Track 12, FOXB; Disc 1, first part of Track 11, RCA)--Luke's training as a Jedi begins with this short piece of music, which as it turned out, was unheard in the film. The OLP and FOXB (which was the first part of the title cue) ends at the :44 mark, but the RCA continues with the conclusion of the cue in its entirety. One can hear how the flourishes underscored Luke swinging from vine to vine during his exercises. "Ben's Theme" is again put to use in this track too.

20. THE MAGIC TREE (Side 4, Track 3, OLP; Disc 2, Track 13, FOXB; Disc 1, second part of Track 11, RCA)--For this track, Luke undergoes a crucial test as a Jedi in a cave underneath a huge tree (hence the cue's title) as he confronts the power of the Dark Side of the Force. Dark and eerie orchestrations underscore Luke's confrontation with a duplicate of Darth Vader. Synthesizers are used for the first time in the trilogy during this somber piece. The end of this track (the one with Vader's march) as heard in the original edition of the film was tracked with a hybrid of music from the beginning of "The Imperial March" and the end of "Aboard The Executor". The OLP, FOXB, and RCA (as well as the "special edition" film re-release) present the end section as originally recorded and intended to be used.

21. ATTACK POSITION (Disc 4, Track 8, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 3, RCA)--The Millenium Falcon comes out of the asteroid field and does a strategic maneuver to outsmart an Imperial destroyer in this dramatic cue, presented in its entirety as originally recorded and used in the film. The conclusion of this track (with "Yoda's Theme") underscores Luke's continuing training as a Jedi as he sees his X-Wing sinking in the water. This will lead directly into the next piece. The RCA was re-titled "Attacking A Star Destroyer".

22. YODA AND THE FORCE (Side 3, Track 4, OLP; Disc 2, Track 14, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 4, RCA)--"Yoda's Theme" is the main basis for this track as Luke attempts to raise his X-Wing from the watery swamp of Dagobah. When he fails, Yoda informs Luke of the wisdom of the Force before the old Jedi Master successfully raises the ship from the water. As with "The Magic Tree", the track in the original edition of the film ends with the "Imperial March/Aboard The Executor" hybrid, while the OLP, FOXB, and RCA (as well as the "special edition" film re-release) present the Vader's march reprise ending as originally recorded and intended to be used.

23. IMPERIAL STARFLEET DEPLOYED (Disc 2, first part of Track 5, RCA)--After Lord Vader has killed Captain Needa for his cowardice, Admiral Piett orders the fleet deployed in their search for the Millenium Falcon. The cue ends as the fleet is breaking up. The first 26 seconds of this track was unused in the film, but later used in the radio adaptation.

24. CITY IN THE CLOUDS (Side 3, second part of Track 2, OLP; Disc 2, second part of Track 15, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 5, RCA)--Three-part cue (presented as one whole both on the soundtracks and in the film) mostly underscoring the introduction of Cloud City of Bespin. The first part (of which the first ten seconds went unheard in the original edition of the film and later restored to the "special edition" film re-release) accompanies the Falcon making their journey to Bespin unaware that Boba Fett is following them (the bounty hunter represented by a bassoon motif that would later be heard in "Betrayal At Bespin"). We then segue to Dagobah where Luke, under training from Yoda, suddenly has a vision of Bespin with his friends in danger (a 22-second portion of this section was left off the OLP). The third section is a beautiful orchestration of chorus and orchestra as we're introduced to the magnificence of Cloud City. The chorus dies down as the Falcon lands on Platform 327. The final 49 seconds of this track went unused in the film.

25. LANDO'S PALACE (Side 4, Track 3, OLP; Disc 2, Track 16, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 6, RCA)--The centerpiece of this cue is a new theme for Lando Calrissian, administrator of Cloud City and old friend of Han Solo. This theme also represents the marvelous interiors of Bespin. The music turns sinister as C-3PO confronts an unseen enemy. We then segue to the planet Dagobah, where Luke has decided to end his training to go to the rescue of his friends. Here, "Luke's Theme", "Ben's Theme", and "Yoda's Theme" are once again junxaposed as Ben and Yoda warn him not to leave Dagobah prematurely for a fight for which Luke is not ready. The piece ends with a quiet passage of "Ben's Theme" as Yoda reminds his student Ben of "another".

26. BETRAYAL AT BESPIN (Disc 2, Track 7, RCA)--This is actually three separate cues from the next act of the film. The first picks up from where "Lando's Palace" left off (with "Luke's Theme" as its basis) as Luke departs Dagobah for Bespin, little knowing what awaits him there, then we cut back to Cloud City for a passage of the "Han and Leia" theme as the Princess suspects something about Lando. The next cue covers the title scene as Lando leads his guests to the dining room where Darth Vader awaits (it begins with "Lando's Theme" followed by a strong but brief passage of Vader's march as Han fires at Vader to no avail). As the Stormtroopers surround the Rebels and Boba Fett appears, we return to the bassoon motif heard earlier in "City In The Clouds". The second cue ends with "Luke's Theme" underscoring Luke "almost there" at Bespin. The third and final cue finds Chewie trying to put 3PO back together again (set to the bridge from "Hyperspace"), followed by another brief passage of Vader's march as the Dark Lord begins torturing Han Solo. The final chord, by the way, was tracked into a cue on the OLP, which we'll discuss in a moment.

27. DEAL WITH THE DARK LORD (Disc 2, Track 8, RCA)--This music comes after Vader has made an altered deal with Lando concerning the fate of his friends which he betrayed, represented by Vader's march. The "Hyperspace" bridge returns as 3PO now finds his head screwed backwards. After Han and Leia is thurst into the room, the "Han and Leia" theme surfaces, then when Lando enters, a short action cue is heard as Han and Lando end up in a fight. We then abruptly cut into a rising horn and another statement of the "Han and Leia" theme, as we lead to the carbon freezing chambers for...

28. CARBON FREEZE (Disc 4, first part of Track 17, FOXB; Disc 2, most of the first part of Track 9, RCA)--One of many crucial cues that was left out of the OLP as Han meets his frozen fate. Here, dramatic passages of the "Han and Leia" theme and Vader's march clash. Pounding brass represents Han being lowered into the freezing chamber. A sad passage of "Han and Leia"'s theme underscores Leia looking on the frozen effigy of her beloved captain. After an Imperial officer has informed Vader of Luke's arrival, we are introduced to Boba Fett's theme (here junxaposed with Vader's march) as he prepares to take his frozen prize to Jabba the Hut. The FOXB presents this cue exactly as heard in the film, while the RCA has been extended with an alternate passage that wasn't used, the second of the "hidden alternate cues" buried within that particular CD (we'll discuss this in "Alternate Cues").

29. LUKE PURSUES THE CAPTIVES (Disc 4, second part of Track 17, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 9, RCA)--Most of this cue is based on Boba Fett's theme as we see Luke (having arrived on Bespin) trying to find his friends whom he believes is in danger. A shootout then develops, set to "Yoda's Theme", first with Boba, and then with Imperial guards who are escorting Leia and company to the Star Destroyer. Leia warns Luke of the danger that awaits, but the young warrior ignores her warnings. The music quiets, and Luke enters a dark chamber. The first grand piano slam signals the start of a very pivitol one minute-and-20-second section not used in the film (although the first piano slam can clearly be heard in the original release version of the film). This unused section begins the duel between Luke and Darth Vader. This is where the Dark meets the Light for the first time in the trilogy. Again, Boba Fett's theme is more prominent than Vader's march during this sequence. The final 15 seconds of this cue returns us to music heard in the film as Lando's men outpower the Imperial troops. This will directly lead to the next cue. The RCA was re-titled "Darth Vader's Trap".

30. DEPARTURE OF BOBA FETT (Side 2, Track 2, OLP; Disc 4, third part of Track 17, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 9, RCA)--Picks up immediately where the previous cue left off (in the film, it starts right after Lando's line "Keep it quiet"). Lando and friends try to save Han Solo before Boba takes him away. Boba Fett's theme again is reprised as Chewie strangles Lando for betraying Han, but Leia asks Chewie to let him go and continue their pursuit of Boba. The brass passage heard earlier in "Luke Pursues The Captives" underscores Han being lifted into the cargo hold of the Slave I, Boba's ship. The next section is set to a nervous version of "Han and Leia"'s theme finds R2-D2 reunited with his counterpart, C-3PO, as the group rushes to Platform 327 too late to save their frozen friend. A shootout then develops. This second section was heavily edited in the original release version of the film and the music there ended with the Slave I taking off, while the "special edition" film release lets the music run on without edits, up until the time we go back to the carbon freezing chamber. The remainder of the track was meant to underscore the continuation of the lightsaber duel between Luke and Vader (this section was unused in the film but later utilized in the radio adaptation). The cue ends with a short reprise of "Luke's Theme". While the final chord of the OLP version of the cue was tracked from the final chord of "Betrayal At Bespin", the FOXB and RCA versions are presented as originally recorded and intended to be used.

31. THE DUEL (Side 4, Track 1, OLP; Disc 2, Track 17, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 10, RCA)--Actually, only the first part of the music presented here covers the title scene, where Luke and Vader continue their duel not only with lightsabers, but with thrown objects. Vader's march is more prominent here than the two previous duel cues. We then segue back to Lando and Leia and their continuing shootout, beginning with passages of "Yoda's Theme" and "Lando's Theme". The "Han and Leia" theme then is heard as R2, having overcome Imperial stormtroopers, allows Lando and company to escape with their lives in the Millenium Falcon. Trumpet phrases signal the cue's climax. The synthisized opening was not heard in the actual film. The RCA was re-titled "The Clash Of Lightsabers".

32. LOSING A HAND (Disc 4, Track 18, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 11, RCA)--One of the most emotional cues in the entire Empire score (and one of the best in the entire trilogy), which begins with Vader severing Luke's sword hand. Vader's theme is present throughout during the Dark Lord's plea to Luke, revealing his true identity and encouraging the wounded Jedi to join his cause. Swirling strings underscore Luke falling down the chasm, into a waste chute and sending him onto a weather vane beneath Bespin. This introduces a "call for help" passage conveying his pain and desperation. The music quiets down as Luke calls for Leia. "Ben's Theme" returns as Leia realizes Luke is in danger, and decides to go back to Bespin to rescue her friend. As the Falcon turns back, Lando spots the weather vane. The "call for help" passage returns, and slowly "rises" in sound as Lando catches Luke before the fallen Jedi can slip into endless space. Just as Imperial TIE fighters close in, the Falcon finally departs Bespin. On the RCA, this cue was called "Rescue From Cloud City". In the "special edition" film re-release, this was divided in two with music at the midpoint tracked from the scene where Vader reveals his identity to Luke (in place of the Vader's march passage which underscores the Dark Lord calling for a shuttle). On the RCA, the music crossfades right into the next piece with perfection (as it was in the film), while you can hear the final note segue clearly on the FOXB, thus ruining the dramatic effect.

33. HYPERSPACE (Side 2, Track 4, OLP; Disc 2, Track 18, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 11, RCA)--Climactic cue underscoring the Falcon's eventual escape into hyperspace. This mostly original piece relies heavily on a chopping four-note measure used throughout. It is interuppted at several points by "Princess Leia's Theme" (as Leia is reunited with Luke) and Vader's march (as Vader orders his men to prepare their weapons for stun). The bridge of this piece is what has served as the theme for the 'droids throughout the entire score. The music slows down as Vader telepathically contacts Luke, once again lurning him to the Dark Side of the Force. The music returns to fast pace as R2-D2 finally allows the Falcon to enter lightspeed, accompanied by a major chord. The cue turns dark, however, with the presence of Vader's march as the Dark Lord ponders his failure to bring Luke to the Dark Side. In the "special edition" film re-release, this track was divided with tracked music from "Losing A Hand" (seen over, believe it or not, outtakes from Return Of The Jedi, used to represent Vader's arrival in the Star Destroyer).

34. THE REBEL FLEET (aka "Finale") (Disc 2, first part of Track 19, FOXB)--We're now heading into the film's epilogue (when Luke and company have safely reached a Rebel transport headed for the rendezvous on Tatooine) where Luke, now fitted with a prosthetic hand to replace his real one lost in Cloud City, bids farewell to Lando and Chewie as they begin their long quest to rescue Han Solo. As Luke joins Leia and the droids looking on after the departed Millenium Falcon, "Han and Leia"'s theme is reprised signifying hope that Leia's true love, Han Solo, will be found. The story itself, though unresolved, is brought to a satisfying conclusion. The FOXB is presented exactly as heard in the original release version. See "Alternate Cues" for the rest of the story. By the way, in the actual film, this is preceded by 20 seconds tracked from "Yoda And The Force".

35. END CREDITS (Disc 4, second part of Track 21, FOXB)--Reprises all of the major themes heard in Empire, starting with a brief passage of "Luke's Theme", followed by an arrangement of the concert version of "Yoda's Theme", then onto "The Imperial March", and finally a reprise of "Han and Leia"'s theme. We wind it up with the Rebel Fanfare, with the first four notes of Vader's march hidden, and the brass and timpani roll into a crescendo-ish conclusion. The FOXB is presented exactly as it is in the original release version, though you can clearly hear the edit point during "Yoda's Theme". See "Alternate Cues" for the rest of this story.


ALTERNATE CUES

1. THE IMPERIAL PROBE (Side 1, second part of Track 1, OLP; Disc 2, second part of Track 2, FOXB; Disc 1, second part of Track 2, RCA)--This is the original recorded version of the music following the opening prologue scroll where remote probes are launched into space and one of them lands on Hoth. The opening is about the same as the final film version (with the hidden introduction of Vader's march), but here this particular cue is more dramatic than its film counterpart. A 12-second segment (from 2:30 to 2:42 on the RCA) was left out of the OLP and FOXB. From the end of this segment, we go to "The Ice Planet Hoth" (see #4 above) and join Luke on his Tauntaun. The OLP edition was the second section of the track "Main Title (Star Wars)", while the FOXB was the second section of "The Imperial Probe (extended version)", and the RCA was the first section of "The Ice Planet Hoth".

2. LUKE'S NOCTURNAL VISITOR (remains unreleased)--This is a slight variation on the final film version of this track, especially the end section of this. This alternate version was never used in the film, obviously, but when you listen to the one in the actual film you'll get an idea on the slow tempo the end section might have been had it been used.

3. CARBON FREEZE (Disc 2, portion of first part of Track 9, RCA)--Original version of a 40-second segment covering a section from where Han's carbon frozen effigy is being lifted from the chamber up through an Imperial officer signaling Luke's arrival. This passage is a more dark-sounding piece than the one heard in the final film. While the RCA presents both 40-second segments, this particular piece can be found on the section from 2:40 to 3:21 on Track 9.

4. THE REBEL FLEET (Side 4, Track 4, OLP; Disc 2, first part of Track 12, RCA)--This is the original recorded version of the epilogue music that leads to the end credits. The very opening is different (with some strings not clearly present in the final film version), and it has been extended a bit both in length and composition. While the FOXB presents the version as heard in the original release print, this alternate cue as heard on the OLP and RCA can be heard in the "special edition" film re-release (albeit in edited form).

5. END CREDITS (Side 4, second part of Track 4, OLP; Disc 2, second part of Track 19, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 12, RCA)--As far as tempo goes, this version of the end credits is a wee bit slower than the one in the film (you'll notice the difference when you listen to the film version), but it still harkens on the same themes ("Luke's Theme", "Yoda's Theme", "The Imperial March", "Han and Leia", "Rebel Fanfare"). On the OLP (which was part of the "Finale" cue), "The Imperial March" section has been tracked with a portion of the concert arrangement version (which we'll talk about in a moment), while Disc 2 of the FOXB and RCA presents this as originally recorded.

CONCERT ARRANGEMENTS

1. YODA'S THEME (Side 1, Track 2, OLP; Disc 2, Track 10, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 2, RCA)--Straightforward presentation of the theme for the old Jedi Master of Dagobah, evoking gentleness and folly.

2. THE IMPERIAL MARCH (Darth Vader's Theme) (Side 2, Track 1, OLP; Disc 2, Track 5, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 1, RCA)--For Empire, John Williams wrote an entirely new theme for Darth Vader, and at the same time to represent the evil might of the Galactic Empire. This march serves basically as the theme music for the entire film. It is, in essence, the "flip side" of "Yoda's Theme" and obviously is a majestic minor-chord piece that represents the villainy of the Imperial forces. The first 50 seconds of this piece was used in the final film to replace a portion of "Aboard The Executor" (Second portion of Track 4 on the RCA). The final portion was also tracked in the OLP "Finale" to replace the original recorded reprise of the march.

 

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    PHASE THREE
    Episode VI: Return of the Jedi

    Finalized 12/18/98
    Version 2.0 created 6/16/99

This is the most complex phase in the entire series of articles on the "Star Wars Trilogy". To put this all into context...the original soundtrack album was originally released in 1983 as a single album. This was due to the declining interest in vinyl and the emergence of the compact disc. As a result, this album became more of an original score album than a soundtrack recording, and many crucial film cues were left out.

However, two notable re-recordings more or less made up for what was missing on the OST. Until 1993, the only other albums which additional music could be found was a Var?se Sarabande album called, naturally, "The Star Wars Trilogy" (with the Utah Symphony Orchestra), and an RCA Red Seal release of the Jedi score by Charles Gerdhart and the National Philharmonic Orchestra. And the rest is history.

The score, recorded at EMI/Abbey Road Studios in London, recieved special treatment in 1983 with George Lucas' TAP (Theater Alignment Program), which ensured improved good sound in theaters of that period. This was almost a throwback to Star Wars, where the score, as mentioned before, recorded at Anvil Studios in Denham, recieved similar treatment with the Dolby Stereo format. John Williams would serve another digitized score a decade later with the score for "Jurassic Park," which introduced DTS (Ditital Theater Sound)

For this section of the article we will take into account all the major releases which contained the Jedi score, with the exception of the Sony Classical recording with the Skywalker Symphony Orchestra.

Also, we should note that there are many alternate cues either featured in the FOXB or hidden in the RCA, and the fact that new music was recorded for the "special edition" re-release. We will therefore first deal with the music as originally recorded and intended to be used in the original release version, with all the cues in order, rather than list the actual film cues first (as we did with Star Wars: A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back). This will give us a better perspective on the landmark third score in the "Star Wars Trilogy".

Abbreviations: OST stands for the original soundtrack album; FOXB stands for the Fox Scores/Arista box set; RCA stands for the RCA Victor "special edition" CDs; RCAG stands for the RCA Red Seal recording with Charles Gerdhardt and the National Philharmonic Orchestra; VAR stands for the Var?se Sarabande "The Star Wars Trilogy" release with the Utah Symphony Orchesta. For this article, we will not count the cassette and CD releases of the original soundtrack album since it is essentially the original album content. By the same token, we will also not count the CD version of the RCA Red Seal Re-recording, nor the Sony Classical re-recording featured on the Skywalker Symphony Orchestra's recording of "The Star Wars Trilogy".

1. 20TH CENTURY FOX FANFARE (Disc 3, Track 1, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 1, RCA; Side 1, Track 1, VAR)--In the film and on the FOXB & RCA, the film opens with the same 1980 re-recording of the Fox Fanfare as first used in The Empire Strikes Back. The VAR features, obviously, an entirely different recording by the Utah Symphony Orchestra.

2. MAIN TITLE (Side 1, first part of Track 1, OLP & RCAG; Disc 3, first part of Track 2, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 2, RCA)--This is the same main title arrangment of "Luke's Theme" as heard in the previous two films and seen over the prologue scroll. The OLP is the first part of the cue "Main Title (The Story Continues)". For some reason, the original CD is labeled "Main Title (The Main Story Continues)".

3. APPROACHING THE DEATH STAR (Side 1, second part of Track 2, OLP & RCAG; Disc 3, second part of Track 2, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 2, RCA)--Covering the opening scene in the film where we are introduced to a new, but uncompleted, Death Star. It starts out rather appropriately eerily, then builds to a dramatic rendering of "The Imperial March", which is then heard in passages as Vader informs the commander of the Emperor's arrival. On the RCAG, it has been edited only in composition with the track ending with Vader's first appearance in the film. The OLP was the second part of the cue "Main Title (The Story Continues)".

4. TATOOINE RENDEZVOUS (Disc 1, fourth part of Track 2, RCA)--This jaunty piece of music (beginning at the 5:44 mark of the RCA's Track 2) originally covered scenes with Lord Vader contacting his son through the Force, and Luke presenting the robot R2-D2 with a new lightsaber. As it turned out, these scenes were deleted from the film, and so the music was not used at all. After the opening Death Star scene, the music in the film picks up at the 7:16 mark as we follow C-3PO and R2-D2 to the castle of Jabba the Hut. The track concludes with an unused cue covering the opening of the palace door (this begins at the CD's 8:07 mark to conclusion). Incidentally, this track opens with an alternate opening section of a climactic cue which we'll discuss later.

5. JABBA'S BAROQUE RECITAL (Disc 1, Track 13, RCA)--Synthsizers are again put to use in this first source cue covering the introduction of the slug-like gangster, Jabba the Hut, who has held the carbon-frozen Han Solo for some time.

6. THE DROIDS ARE CAPTURED (Disc 1, Track 3, RCA)--Short orchestral passage that begins with the sight of the still-frozen Han Solo, then we move to the bowels of Jabba's palace where the droids are about to be refitted for service to Jabba.

7. LAPTI NEK (film version) (remains unreleased)--Dance music "performed" by Jabba's Sy Snootles Band. This rendition is markedly different from the other versions which we'll discuss later. For one thing, it has different Huttese lyrics, and the lead vocal is from a different singer than the other versions. An instrumental version of this can be heard in the radio adaptation of Jedi.

8. BOUNTY FOR A WOOKIE (Disc 1, Track 4, RCA)--Princess Leia, disguised as bounty hunter Bousch, presents the Wookie Chewbacca to Jabba for reward. The first 45 seconds of this track, unused in the film, was meant to underscore Oona being eaten alive by the Rancor creature. Parts of this cue were tracked in to the restored Jabba scene in the "Special Edition" of Star Wars: A New Hope.

9. SAIL BARGE DANCE (Variation #1) (remains unreleased)--First of two variations of a dance piece that would later be heard on Jabba's Sail Barge. This rendition comes after the Wookie has been sold to Jabba for reward. The original master tapes to this are said to be lost...that and CD time limitations precluded its release on the "special edition" CD, so this remains unreleased. However, a short section can be heard in the documentary From Star Wars To Jedi: The Making Of A Saga.

10. HAN SOLO RETURNS (At the Court of Jabba The Hut) (Side 1, Track 5, OLP; Disc 3, Track 3, FOXB; Side 2, Track 2, RCAG)--Underscores Han Solo being released from his carbonite prison and immediate capture by Jabba. Starts out quiet, but brass rises as Han comes out of his carbonite coffin. When Bousch reveals itself to be Princess Leia, the "Han and Leia" theme is re-introduced, and that ends the RCAG version. But this original recorded version segues into a passage of the concert arrangement of Jabba's theme (which underscored Jabba's surprise appearance behind the curtain). There are no more than two alternate versions of this (we'll discuss that when we get to "Alternate Cues").

11. LUKE CONFRONTS JABBA (Disc 1, first part of Track 6, RCA)--In this somber cue, Luke has now infiltrated Jabba's palace and demands that Solo be released or Jabba and his friends will die. He uses the Force and his Jedi Knight skills to no avail, and the cue ends with the horns rising as Jabba releases the trap doors leading to the dungeon of the Rancor. The second half of this cue was tracked with music from later in the film (we'll discuss this later), but buried within this piece of music on the RCA is the third section of the film version of the previous "Han Solo Returns" cue, which will be talked about when we get to "Alternate Cues". Otherwise, "Luke Confronts Jabba" is presented on the RCA in two parts, the first found in the section from 0:00 to 1:26, and the second in the section from 2:06 to 3:14 where the next track begins...

12. FIGHT IN THE DUNGEON (Side 2, second part of Track 3, RCAG; Disc 3, Track 4, FOXB; Disc 1, second part of Track 6, RCA)--Brass, winds, and percussion are present on this dramatic underscoring of Luke's confrontation with the Rancor. "Ben's Theme" and "Luke's Theme" intermingle during the struggle. The RCAG only presents the second half of this music, while the FOXB and RCA present this in its entirety. The cue was slightly edited for the final film release. The RCA was re-titled "Den Of The Rancor".

13. SARLACC SENTENCE (Disc 1, third part of Track 6, RCA)--Picks up right where the previous cue left off, as Han and Luke face Jabba and their death sentence for their defiance. Timpani and synthesizer (underscoring the death of the Rancor) begin this piece. The final chord was unused in the original version of the film, while restored to the "special edition" film.

14. SAIL BARGE DANCE (Variation #2) (remains unreleased)--Second arrangement of the music for the Sail Barge, this time done with Calypso instruments. The original master tapes are said to be lost, that (along with CD time limitations) precluded its release on the "special edition" CD.

15. THE PIT OF CARKOON (Disc 1, first part of Track 7, RCA)--Underscores the scene at the title spot leading to the sail barge battle. Only the first ten seconds (with the strong brass) were used in the film. However, most of the unused second half were tracked into a restored Jabba scene in the "Special Edition" film of Star Wars: A New Hope.

16. THE RETURN OF THE JEDI (Disc 4, Track 19, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 15, RCA)--The music to the sail barge battle, as John Williams originally composed and recorded before a entirely new piece was used for the final film. Here, Williams opts mostly for originality, not using thematic material. However, the beginning, middle (with the final passage of the Jabba theme) and the end (the passage that would be used in a climactic cue) are about the same as what was eventually written and used. Incidentally, a passage of this recording would turn up in a concert arrangement of one of the main themes (see "Concert Arrangements"). This interesting piece of music would eventually be used in the radio adaptation of Jedi. The RCA was re-titled "Sail Barge Assault (Alternate)".

17. THE EMPEROR ARRIVES (Disc 3, Track 6, FOXB; Disc 1, first part of Track 8, RCA)--Underscores Emperor Palpatine's arrival at the still-uncompleted Death Star. This cue introduces a new, sinister theme for the master of the Dark Side of the Force. This is the original recorded version of the cue. Here, the beginning is very similar to what was eventually written and used in the film, but in this rendition a trumpet and horn solo (not strings, as eventually used in the final film) lead into Vader's march. We'll discuss the film version of this cue later. Also, the final statement of Vader's march leading to the next cue was tracked in the final film with a later cue, which we'll also discuss later.

18. THE DEATH OF YODA (Disc 3, Track 7, FOXB; Disc 1, second part of Track 8, RCA)--We switch to gentler surroundings as Luke visits Dagobah for the last time to find a dying Yoda revealing the truth about Darth Vader, and giving the young student the last words of wisdom before he becomes one with the Force. "Yoda's Theme" is the basis for this cue. Here, to underscore Yoda's death, Williams takes the first few notes of "Yoda's Theme", lowers the third note by half a step while raising the fourth by half a step, and creates a series of four descending notes that would later turn up in a later cue. The piece, as originally recorded, opens with "Luke's Theme", but in the final film it was tracked with music from "Luke's Nocturnal Visitor" (from The Empire Strikes Back). The cue ends as we see the ghostly image of Ben Kenobi who will now reveal the truth behind Yoda's final words.

19. OBI-WAN'S REVELATION (Disc 1, third part of Track 8, RCA)--About 3/4 of this music was unused in the film, and was meant to underscore Ben's discussion with Luke about Darth Vader's identity, as well as that of his sister. "Ben's Theme" is the main basis of the cue. Music used in the film returns when Luke realizes Leia is his true sister. We then segue into space near Sullest where Rebel spaceships have re-unted for a briefing on the coming battle of Endor.

20. ALLIANCE ASSEMBLY (Disc 1, Track 9, RCA)--One track on the OLP is errornsly and purposely titled "Rebel Briefing". This particular cue might as well have been called that instead of the title that RCA gave this piece. In any event, this cue underscores the mission briefing by the Alliance leaders on the conflict against the Empire that is to come. Military music forms the construction of this track until we come to a brief reprise of "Luke's Theme" upon the young Jedi's appearance, after which the military motif returns to round out the track. Re-edited for the final film.

21. FAKING THE CODE (Disc 4, Track 13, FOXB; Disc 1, Track 10, RCA)--Descending horns and strings form this cue accompanying Han, Luke and company to Endor aboard a stolen shuttle. "Ben's Theme" and Vader's march intermingle while Luke senses Vader's presence aboard the Executor. The RCA was re-titled "Shuttle Tydiruim Approaches Endor".

22. SPEEDER BIKE CHASE (Disc 1, first part of Track 11, RCA)--The adventures on Endor begin with this brief track covering Luke and company scouting the forest moon for the shield generator. Starts out with slow processional music (with the descending horn motif heard in the earlier cue), then fast action music comes as Han takes on Stormtroopers, this leads to the title scene. Curiously enough, the music ends as the actual speeder bike chase begins, so the rest of this sequence goes unscored. This is one rare moment in the film where musical silence is utilized.

23. LAND OF THE EWOKS (Disc 1, second part of Track 11, RCA)--Lengthy cue begins when the speeder bike chase ends and Luke and Han begin their hunt for the injured Princess Leia. Meanwhile, the unconcious Princess has been awakened by a teddy bear-like creature called Ewok, and it is here that the "Parade Of The Ewoks" theme is introduced. The music quiets down briefly before dramatic passages underscore a confrontation with another Stormtrooper. We then segue to the Death Star as the Emperor instructs Vader to go to Endor to wait for Luke, whom the evil master of the Dark Side senses will come to his father to be brought to the Death Star for final conversion to the Dark Side of the Force (the Emperor's theme is again heard here). A brief reading of "Princess Leia's Theme" introduces the next segment where Luke, Han, and the Droids are caught in a booby trap. After they are set free by R2-D2, the cue is interuppted at the 8:40 mark by a 21-second segment of the film version of an earlier cue (we'll discuss this later in "Alternate Cues"). At the 9:01 mark, the cue resumes until the end.

24. EWOK FEAST (Disc 2, first part of Track 11, RCA)--First of two source cues from the Ewok sequences. This particular one, performed solely by percussion, underscores Luke and Han being presented as "the main course at a banquet" in C-3PO's honor at a special Ewok ceremony. In the film this piece crossfades into the next one...

25. THE LEVITATION/THREEPIO'S BEDTIME STORY (Disc 1, Track 12, RCA)--Two-part cue being presented here as one whole both in the film and on the RCA soundtracks, covering Luke using the Force to levitate C-3PO in exchange for the Ewoks releasing the captive group, followed immediately by 3PO describing, in his own native language, the story of the Galactic Civil War to the Ewoks. This will encourage the bear-like creatures to join the Rebel cause.

26. PART OF THE TRIBE (Disc 2, second part of Track 11, RCA)--The last of two source cues from the Ewok sequences, this one taking place after 3PO's story. Like its predecessor, this is performed solely with percussion.

27. THE BATTLE OF ENDOR
>From this point onward to the end of the film we go into the longest continuous cue in the entire trilogy, covering the triumpant climax of our story. There is no pause, just wall-to-wall music, a remarkable feat that could only be accomplished by John Williams and the London Symphony Orchestra. A section of tracked music from "Yoda And The Force" (from Empire) precedes all of this. Get ready, we're heading for home...

a) BROTHER AND SISTER (Disc 4, Track 14, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 3, RCA)--This is the actual film version of the concert arrangement "Luke And Leia", as the young Jedi finally reveals to the Princess his relation to Darth Vader. Once again, we hear the four-note descention first heard in "The Death Of Yoda", followed by the introduction of "Luke And Leia"'s theme. "Han and Leia" rounds out the first movement as Leia reveals her confusing feelings to the Correlian.

b) FATHER AND SON (Disc 2, second part of Track 3, RCA)--In contrast, the following cue is a much darker passage, as Vader's march takes centerstage. Luke surrenders to Lord Vader in an attempt to bring his father out of the Dark Side, but to no avail. Luke allows himself to become a captive of the Empire to face the Emperor on the Death Star. As Vader ponders the future, we hear a sad passage of "Luke's Theme"...at least that is what ended the track as originally recorded (in the final film this was tracked with the tail end of "The Emperor Confronts Luke").

c) THE FLEET GOES INTO HYPERSPACE (Disc 4, second part of Track 3, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 3, RCA)--A percussive prologue opens this movement as Han and company begin their approach towards the shield generator. A reprise of the "Ewok" parade segues into the title scene as Lando leads the Rebel spaceships into hyperspace in approach of the fourth moon of Endor. The "Throne Room" theme serves as the basis for this cue. On the FOXB, the music begins as we see the Falcon and accompanying spaceships, while the RCA presents this movement in its entirety. The RCA was re-titled "The Fleet Enters Hyperspace".

d) HEROIC EWOK (Side 2, Track 4, RCAG; Disc 4, first part of Track 3, FOXB; Disc 2, fourth part of Track 3, RCA)--A motif heard earlier in "Tatooine Rendezvous" is reprised in the opening of this movement, then as one of the Ewoks begins its chase of an Imperial riding a speeder bike, the "Ewok" parade takes over. On the RCAG, this music ends at the point where the Ewok overtakes the Stormtrooper, but the film version (as well as the FOXB and RCA) goes further as Han, Leia, and Chewie overtake the Imperial officers holding fort on the bunker. The final chord was left out of the FOXB but restored to the RCA.

e) THE EMPEROR CONFRONTS LUKE (Disc 3, Track 10, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 4, RCA)--A slow passage of Vader's march leads to a male choral accompanyment of the Emperor's theme as we see Luke finally coming face to face with Palpatine, Galactic Emperor, who is determined to complete the young Jedi's training and become a slave to the Dark Side of the Force. The last few seconds of this cue was tracked to the end of two earlier cues, "The Emperor Arrives" and "Father And Son". The RCA was re-titled "Emperor's Throne Room".

f) INTO THE TRAP (Side 1, Track 2, OLP; Side 2, first part of Track 3, RCAG; Disc 3, Track 11, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 5, RCA)--Action cue accompanying the start of the Battle of Endor as Han and company infiltrate the bunker only to be captured by Imperials. Then we segue to majestic minor-chord passages (heard earlier in "Approaching The Death Star") underscoring Rebel spaceships (led by Lando Calrissian) coming out of hyperspace and approaching the Death Star, but when they find the shield is still in place, they turn back only to face Imperial fighters racing towards them. The dogfight in space commences at this point. Slightly edited for the final film.

g) FOREST AMBUSH (Disc 2, second part of Track 5, RCA)--Returning to the Death Star, the Emperor's theme can be heard as the mighty sorcerer urges Luke to retrieve his lightsaber and strike him down, thus giving in to the young Jedi's anger. We then segue back to Endor with Vader's march underscoring the Rebels taken prisoner by Imperial officers and Stormtroopers. 3PO and the Ewoks then lead some Troops into an Ewok trap, thus beginning...

h) FIRST EWOK BATTLE (Disc 3, first part of Track 12, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 5, RCA)--Musical chaos develops as the ground battle gets underway. Musical themes are scattered in all directions (accompanying the dramatic action on screen), leading to a majestic (but minor-chord) motif that will be present in the next movement. For those of you soundtrack purists, this motif can be found in the section from 2:43 to 3:04 on the FOXB, and from 7:13 to 7:35 on the RCA. This movement was slightly re-edited for the final film. The RCA, re-titled "Scout Walker Scramble", presents the final film mix of this cue, while the FOXB presents a different one.

i) FIGHT WITH THE FIGHTERS (Side 2, Track 3, VAR; Disc 3, second part of Track 12, FOXB; Disc 2, fourth part of Track 5, RCA)--Possibly the best piece of music in the entire score, as we now shift between three battles simultaneously...the battle in space (from where this movement gets its title), the ground battle on Endor, and the Emperor ordering the Death Star space station fully operational. Not even words can describe this crucial piece of music that was sadly left out of the OLP. But there is use of Vader's march, the Ewok parade, and the majestic minor-chord motif we heard earlier in the previous movement. The first half of this on the VAR re-recording (titled "Fight With Tie Fighters") is very slow (when compared to what is heard in the film), thus ruining the dramatic effect. The RCA was re-titled "Prime Weapon Fires". This cue was edited slightly for the final film.

k) THE LIGHTSABER (Disc 2, second part of Track 6, RCA)--Picking up where the previous piece left off, this variation on the Emperor's theme underscores Luke finally succumbing to the temptations of the Dark Side and calling his lightsaber. The movement ends with a drum roll and heavy brass section that was replaced in the final film with tracked music from a later cue. On the RCA, this begins at the :46 mark of Track 6 immediately following a piece of an alternate cue (see "Alternate Cues" for the rest of this story). The final note of this was supposed to crossfade into the first note of the next cue, but on the RCA there is a short pause prior to the next piece...

l. THE EWOK BATTLE (Side 2, Track 1, RCAG; Disc 4, Track 7, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 6, RCA)--If you have ever listened to the concert arrangement of "The Forest Battle" on any of the Jedi score recordings and have not seen the film, then you will have a general idea of what this actual film version sounds like, only it has been extended with a musical passage underscoring Chewie and the Ewoks' take-over of an AT-AT, and the midsection shortened in composition only. A six-second passage heard in the film when one of the AT-AT explodes was a re-recorded one (we'll deal with this shortly). This particular movement is presented as originally recorded and intended to be used. The last ten seconds of the track was supposed to underscore Han's failure to open the bunker door, but it was not used in the final film.

m. LEIA IS WOUNDED (Disc 4, Track 16, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 7, RCA)--By the same token, the first seven seconds of this (an alternate intro also meant to underscore Han's failure to open the bunker door) wasn't used in the final film either (a tracked portion of "First Ewok Battle" was used). But from the 0:08 mark of the track the music is presented as heard in the film, covering Leia being shot in the arm by a Stormtrooper, and the opening phase of the lightsaber duel between Luke and his father, Darth Vader. The dramatic bridge from the previous "The Ewok Battle" is reprised as Chewie approaches the bunker, and the Emperor's theme re-surfaces during this first duel. The end of this track segues immediately into the next one, but a short pause divides the two on the RCA (in the actual film, the last note of this matches the first note of the next track). The second half of the track on the FOXB was called "Luke And Vader Duel", while on the RCA the second half was called "The Duel Begins". As with "First Ewok Battle", the RCA presents the final film mix, while the version on the FOXB is entirely different.

n. OVERTAKING THE BUNKER (Disc 2, second part of Track 7, RCA)--This next piece covers two scenes, the continuing dogfight in space and Han finally gaining access to the bunker. This short music is entirely original, no thematic material is used.

o. FINAL DUEL (Disc 3, first part of Track 14, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 7, RCA)--This was one of the most requested pieces of Jedi music unreleased until the FOXB...the final phase of Luke and Vader's duel in the Death Star. Here chorus and orchestra blend in one of the darkest cues ever heard in the film. The Emperor's theme is reprised after Luke strikes Vader's hand. The section of music underscoring Luke comparing Darth Vader's amputated arm to that of his mechanical hand was tracked onto the end of the cue "The Lightsaber". "Ben's Theme" undercores Luke's declaration that he will fight no more, he is a true Jedi Knight. The RCA was the first part of the re-titled "The Dark Side Beckons".

p. INTO THE DEATH STAR (Disc 3, second part of Track 14, FOXB; Disc 2, fourth part of Track 7, RCA)--The beginning of this music is reminiscent of the end of "The Forest Battle" concert arrangement as the shield generator is destroyed. The violin ending of "Fight With The Fighters" is reprised, followed by a reading of the "Rebel Fanfare", as Lando and group prepare to penetrate the Death Star. On the RCA, this was the second half of the "The Dark Side Beckons" movement.

q. THE EMPEROR (Side 2, Track 3, OLP; Disc 3, Track 15, FOXB; Disc 2, fifth part of Track 7, RCA)--Here, the Emperor's theme takes centerstage as the sorcerer unleashes the power of the Dark Side on Luke Skywalker. The wounded Darth Vader is indecisive at first, but then the music turns triumphant as his good side (buried in the soul of Anakin Skywalker) surfaces. This redemption, set to "Ben's Theme", leads to the final commuppence of Emperor Palpatine. As his body explodes in the reactor shaft, the chorus and orchestra die down, and Luke crawls over to his father's side. The FOXB and RCA were re-titled "The Emperor's Death".

r. SUPERSTRUCTURE CHASE (Side 1, Track 3, VAR; Disc 2, first part of Track 7, RCA)--An arrangement of the "TIE Fighter Attack" music (from Star Wars: A New Hope) is heard during the scene where Lando leads a group of fighters into the bowels of the Death Star. As the group splits into two, the fast-pased "The Return Of The Jedi" arrangment of the "Rebel Fanfare" is heard, then an arrangement of a section of "X Wings Draw Fire" (also from Star Wars: A New Hope) underscores the final fate of the Super Star Destroyer Executor. The ending of this piece resembles the end of "TIE Fighter Attack", only it changes chords. Drum rolls follow, which leads to the next piece. The VAR is a re-arrangement and re-titled "Here They Come", placed in the Star Wars section of the disc.

s. DARTH VADER'S DEATH (section 1 intro) (Disc 1, third part of Track 2, RCA)--This is the original introduction to the music heard when Vader is unmasked. It starts out with the four-note motif heard in the "Approaching The Death Star" and "Into The Trap" cues, then goes into a horn reprise of Vader's march, and ends with synthsizers. This 27-second intro can be heard in the section from 5:16 to 5:43 mark on the RCA's Track 2. It was eventually replaced for the final film (see "Alternate Cues").

t. DARTH VADER'S DEATH (Side 2, Track 4, VAR; Disc 3, Track 16, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 7, RCA)--After the introduction, this music picks up as heard in the film. A very subtle passage of Vader's march is heard when the Dark Lord is finally unmasked. As Anakin Skywalker, he tells Luke that he was right, and reminds his son to tell his sister the same. With that, Anakin Skywalker, Darth Vader, Luke's father, passes away. In the VAR arrangement, a series of bells are present in the final few chords, signifying death.

u. THROUGH THE FLAMES (Disc 3, Track 17, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 7, RCA)--Triumphant cue underscoring the destruction of the Death Star. "Luke's Theme" is heard during the young Jedi's escape from the deteriorating docking bay, while the ending reminds us of the end passage from "The Return Of The Jedi". The first 20 seconds of this was not used, and was tracked with music from "Losing A Hand" (from The Empire Strikes Back). The RCA was re-titled "The Main Reactor".

v. LEIA BREAKS THE NEWS (Side 2, first part of Track 2, OLP; Disc 3, Track 18, FOXB; Disc 2, first part of Track 8, RCA)--Resolves the uneasy relationship between Han and Leia. "Luke and Leia"'s theme is put to use here. This original recorded version of the piece can be heard in the final version of the film. The OLP was purposely and intentionally re-titled "Rebel Briefing" in order to mislead and surprise people who had not yet seen the film (had it been titled correctly then, it would have spoiled the ending). The RCA's title was "Leia's News". See "Alternate Cues" for the rest of this story.

w. FUNERAL PYRE FOR A JEDI (Side 2, second part of Track 2, OLP: Disc 4, second part of Track 20, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 8, RCA)--This music ends the long suite with Luke lighting a funeral pyre to cremate his father, Darth Vader. the former Anakin Skywalker. In this original recorded version, a bold rendition of "Ben's Theme" is used to great effect. On the OLP, this was the second part of the track titled "Rebel Briefing". The RCA was re-titled "Light Of The Force". Most of this cue was utilized for the radio adaptation of "Jedi". See "Alternate Cues" for the rest of this story.

28. EWOK CELEBRATION (Disc 4, first part of Track 21, FOXB)--The saga finally comes full circle with this celebratory music heard in the final scene in the film where Rebels and Ewoks share the joy in the final defeat of the Galactic Empire. This straightforward choral rendition is presented as originally intended to be used and actually heard in the film, complete with Ewok lyrics by sound designer Ben Burtt, followed by English lyrics by Joseph Williams (John's son) that reads, "Celebrate the love". See "Alternate Cues" for the rest of this story.

29. END TITLE (Side 2, second part of Track 5, OLP; Side 2, second part of Track 6, RCAG; Disc 3, second part of Track 19, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 9, RCA)--Reprises all the major themes in Jedi, including "Luke's Theme", the "Ewok" parade, "Luke and Leia"'s theme, followed by an arrangment of the end medley of "Luke's Theme" and "Rebel Fanfare" from Star Wars: A New Hope. The entire saga triumphantly ends with a passage of the "Throne Room" music from the first film. Shortened for the original release version, and expanded for the "special edition" film release. Incidentally, the RCAG re-recording is stronger in arrangment than its soundtrack counterpart! The RCAG rendition alone is worth listening to.

ALTERNATE CUES

There are more alternate cues in the "Special Edition" soundtrack of Return Of The Jedi than any previous release, some of which are actually heard in the film. So without further adieu, here they are in film order...

1. LAPTI NEK (film version--Instrumental) (remains unreleased)--This is also the film version of the tune heard at Jabba's palace, only without vocals. In a sense, this remains unreleased, but in another sense, it's not. This version was used in the radio adaptation of Jedi (which is itself available on CD).

2. LAPTI NEK (album version) (Side 1, Track 6, OLP; Disc 4, Track 11, FOXB)--Yet another alternate version of the Jabba party tune. Entirely re-orchestrated with different Huttese vocals, and the London Symphony Orchestra is used for back-up. This was even released as a music video (as found on the LaserDisc box set, The Star Wars Trilogy: The Definitive Collection). The music video would make it's way onto VH1's "Hollywood & Vinyl" TV show, where it was presented as part of a preview for the blockbuster film soundtracks of 1998.

3. LAPTI NEK (English version) (remains unreleased)--Here is a fourth version of the Jabba party tune, this time done in the English language! The Huttese title translates to "Fancy Man". It too is unreleased, but it was heard in the PBS documentary From Star Wars To Jedi: The Making Of A Saga.

4. HAN SOLO RETURNS (Alternate version #2) (Disc 1, Track 5, RCA)--Another version of the scene for when Han Solo is released from his carbonite prison. The beginning is the same right up until Jabba appears. The Jabba theme section is different from its original counterpart. This version was used for the radio adaptation of Jedi.

5. HAN SOLO RETURNS (film version) (on the RCA)--Sections of the actual film version of the cue have been scattered on the RCA's Disc 1. The film version starts out the same as its two counterparts until Bousch reveals its mask. The section from where Leia is revealed until the curtain is open to reveal Jabba can be found at the 8:40 to 9:01 mark of the RCA's Track 11 ("Land Of The Ewoks"). The end section (where Han and Leia are led away by Jabba's goons) can be found at the 1:27 to 2:05 mark of the RCA's Track 6 ("Luke Confronts Jabba"). This will lead to tracked music from the tail ends of "Final Duel" and "Fight In The Dungeon".

6. THE RETURN OF THE JEDI (film version) (Side 2, Track 5, OLP; Side 1, Track 5, RCAG; Disc 3, Track 5, FOXB; Disc 1, second part of Track 7, RCA)--The version of the Sail Barge battle cue as heard in the film forsakes originality (as in the first recorded version) and uses some of the trilogy's major themes ("Luke's Theme", "Rebel Fanfare", "Ben's Death", "TIE Fighter Attack", "X Wings Draw Fire") as its basis. The beginning, middle, and end sections are essentially the same. The RCA was re-titled "Sail Barge Assault".

7. THE EMPEROR ARRIVES (first section, film version) (Disc 2, first part of Track 6, RCA)--This is an edited version of the cue's opening section as actually heard in the film. This is the part that was re-scored when the Emperor's shuttle arrives at the Death Star. This can be heard at the 0:00 to :46 mark of the RCA's Disc 2, Track 6 ("The Lightsaber").

8. THE EWOK BATTLE (six-second bridge) (remains unreleased)--This passage can be heard in the actual film just as the first AT-AT explodes and the Ewoks cheer for joy. This has never been released in any format.

9. DARTH VADER'S DEATH (introduction-section 1, film version) (Side 2, first part of Track 5, VAR; Disc 3, first part of Track 16, FOXB; Disc 2, second part of Track 8, RCA)--Re-recorded 15-second introduction to the cue for the title scene as it was actually heard in the film. The VAR rendition runs a bit slower in pace (I prefer the one in the film).

10 LEIA BREAKS THE NEWS (alternate) (Disc 4, first part of Track 20, FOXB)--Re-recording of the cue (ultimately never used in the film) where Leia and Han resolve their relationship while revealing Luke's relationship to Leia. Generally the same arrangement right up until Han and Leia start to kiss. Then we get a fast version of the "Han and Leia" theme, followed by a reprise of the Ewok parade. The final chord though, is along the same lines as its actual film counterpart.

11. FUNERAL PYRE FOR A JEDI (film version) (Disc 4, second part of Track 20, FOXB; Disc 2, third part of Track 9, RCA)--The scene where Luke cremates his father, Darth Vader, was re-scored for the final film. This is a more softer variation on "Ben's Theme" rather than the more majestic one heard in the original recorded cue. On the RCA, for some strange reason, this was coupled with the original version and re-titled "Light Of The Force".

12. EWOK CELEBRATION (alternate film version mix) (remains unavailable)--This is the same film version of the climactic celebration scene, only without orchestration. This version was used in the Jedi radio adaptation, which is itself available on CD.

13. EWOK CELEBRATION (album version) (Side 2, first part of Track 6, OLP; Disc 3, first part of Track 19, FOXB)--Different mix of the celebratory music from the end of the film, with the Ewoks' voices more present than the straightforward chorus heard in the actual film, but the ending is basically the same (Ewok lyrics crossfading into English lyrics).

CONCERT ARRANGEMENTS

1. JABBA THE HUT (Side 1, Track 4, RCAG; Side 2, Track 4, VAR)--Straightforward presentation of the tuba-laden theme for the slug-like creature. The last half of this was the basis for the original version of the "Han Solo Returns" cue.

2. PARADE OF THE EWOKS (Side 1, Track 4, OLP; Side 1, Track 2, RCAG; Side 2, Track 1, VAR; Disc 3, Track 8, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 1, RCA)--A new march written for the cuddly teddy bear-like creatures of Endor. There's a neat introduction on the VAR not present on any of the other recordings.

3. LUKE AND LEIA (Side 1, Track 3, OLP & RCAG; Side 2, Track 2, VAR; Disc 3, Track 9, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 2, RCA)--A subtle, quiet love theme for Luke and Leia that reflects their true relationship to each other. The actual film version of this can be found on the FOXB's Disc 4-Track 14, and on RCA's Disc 2-Track 3. Incidentally, the better arrangement can be found on the VAR re-recording.

4. THE FOREST BATTLE (Side 2, Track 1, OLP; Side 2, Track 5, RCAG; Disc 3, Track 13, FOXB; Disc 2, Track 12, RCA)--This arrangment of the Ewok battle music was originally written specifically for the OLP, but after listening to this you will get a good idea of what kind of music Williams came up with for the actual film cue. A short passage of this, by the way, is present in the original version of the "The Return Of The Jedi" cue. The RCAG was re-titled "Battle In The Forest".

SPECIAL EDITION MUSIC

Return Of The Jedi is the only film in the trilogy which has had new music written especially for the 1997 "special edition" re-release. We will now list these two pieces of music in film order.

1. JEDI ROCKS (Disc 1, Track 14, RCA)--New Jabba's palace music written not by John Williams, but by Jerry Hey. This replaces the "Lapti Nek" number from the original release version. Both George Lucas and Jedi's director, the late Richard Marquand, wanted to have some sort of elaborate production number to open the film, but such was not possible in 1983. So for the 1997 "special edition" Lucas had Hey come up with this particular tune. There are two parts to this. The "special edition" film presents these two parts in its correct sequence... the first part being the improvisational portion, the second being the vocal section. On the RCA, these two parts are reversed.

2. VICTORY CELEBRATION (Disc 2, first part of Track 10, RCA)--To replace "Ewok Celebration", John Williams decided to write an entirely new piece to fit the expanded finale on Tatooine, Bespin, and Endor. This Latin-styled cue fits this revised finale rather well. Williams re-assembled the London Symphony Orchestra and Chorus especially for this new music.

AND THE REST OF THE STORY...

As for the end titles in the special edition releases, the credit music was expanded with certain sections repeated to fit in the additional crew names. For Star Wars: A New Hope, "Luke's Theme" was repeated. For The Empire Strikes Back, the "Yoda's Theme"/"Imperial March" transition was re-used followed by the "Imperial March" reprise. And for Return Of The Jedi, a section of the Ewok parade reprise was re-used.

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 (Edited)

 

The Charles Gerhardt Return of the Jedi release by the National Philharmonic also has an instrumental version of the ewok celebration scene.

Without english or ewokese lyrics.

The Star Wars and Empire Releases are also excellent.  I have the Charles Gerhardt Trilogy of star wars. 

The throne room and end title on star wars is a very nice rendition, better than the skywalker symphony.

The star wars themes on Star Tracks, and Time Warp by Erich Kunzel are nice as well.

I also have the Utah Symphony release that has a very moving rendition of the death of darth vader.

I also have the boston pops renditions of star wars themes but they don't come close to the LSO even under williams direction.

The only orchestra to ever come close to the LSO was the London Philharmonic on the three lord of the rings films.  But there LP from the seventies on star wars is second rate.

I don't know if your post above mentioned but some of the music from the special edition releases come from unreleased deleted scenes in the movies.  Like where luke builds his lightsaber in return of the jedi and sends the droids with their message to jabba. 

The extended Luke and Ben coversation in Return of the Jedi that was shot but ended up being mostly cut because is gave too much of the prequels away.  But remains in the novelization.

“Always loved Vader’s wordless self sacrifice. Another shitty, clueless, revision like Greedo and young Anakin’s ghost. What a fucking shame.” -Simon Pegg.

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skyjedi2005 said:

 

The Charles Gerhardt Return of the Jedi release by the National Philharmonic also has an instrumental version of the ewok celebration scene.

Without english or ewokese lyrics.

The Star Wars and Empire Releases are also excellent.  I have the Charles Gerhardt Trilogy of star wars. 

The throne room and end title on star wars is a very nice rendition, better than the skywalker symphony.

The star wars themes on Star Tracks, and Time Warp by Erich Kunzel are nice as well.

I also have the Utah Symphony release that has a very moving rendition of the death of darth vader.

 

I like the Utah Symphony version of Darth Vader's death, too. In some ways I think it's superior to the LSO version.

It's been a while since I've heard the Skywalker Symphony CD (I returned it to the store soon after I bought it) but I do remember that I was disappointed by it.

 

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This has been an informative and entertaining page.  Thanks skyjedi2005 and the rest of you guys.  :)

I treasure my 4 disc anthology boxset.  Oh, and JEDI ROCKS! still doesn't...

As a huge fan of soundtrack music (well, the good 'uns anyway), I hope I can catch the forthcoming Star Wars Saga concert this year.  Just a pity it's not the actual London Symphony Orchestra involved...  Should still be epic stuff.

 

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The other time the movie version of Lapti Nek is heard on Star Wars to Jedi. I wonder if there's a pre Mark Hamill voice over tape that still exists. I did read that LFL is doing a very intensive search for all of their alternate footage and deleted scenes so I really hope they fill us in on what is eventually found.

Take back the trilogy. Execute Order '77

http://www.youtube.com/user/Knightmessenger

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I don't think there's anything better out there at the moment.  Starwars.com has a short excerpt of one of the songs and it sounds pretty good, but it's in mono sound.