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RicOlie_2

User Group
Trusted Members
Join date
6-Jun-2013
Last activity
18-Jan-2017
Posts
5597
Web Site
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Post History

Post
#1034738
Topic
What are you reading?
Time

I remember really enjoying them, but as Star Wars novels, not great pieces of literature. As far as most of the EU goes, the Thrawn trilogy is just about as good as it gets, but as far as books go, not even close.

Post
#1020794
Topic
Going away? Post so here!
Time

Then you need me to help bring the quality back up! 😉

It does look like some of the threads have gone off the rails. I can only imagine what the Politics thread is like right now… It’s 500 pages longer than when I last stopped by.

Post
#1010182
Topic
My music
Time

A few years down the road, I’m sure you’ll be glad that didn’t happen.

Post
#1009597
Topic
My music
Time

Yikes, I’m sure glad you quit when you did!

Post
#1009361
Topic
My music
Time

Tyrphanax said:

Can’t wait to hear what you come up with after going through detox. There’s a lot to tap into there creatively, I imagine.

I haven’t been following many threads lately, but I’m glad to hear you did that, Possessed! Have you quit drinking altogether, or have you just toned it down?

Post
#998660
Topic
My music
Time

Not bad!

Glad you’re OK.

Post
#998536
Topic
Random Thoughts
Time

The end of fall is nigh…it’s snowing right now.

Post
#995119
Topic
My music
Time

I recommend Alterations especially! There’s some good stuff on there. (The album art for The Way is pretty good, though. ;P)

Post
#994260
Topic
Religion
Time

TV’s Frink said:

Does it make the opposite clear, that faith with nothing else is all that is needed?

It explicitly says the opposite, actually. According to some people’s interpretations, it does, but the Letter of James says:

“What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? […] So also faith of itself, if it does not have works, is dead.”

Post
#993921
Topic
Religion
Time

Lord Haseo said:

RicOlie_2 said:

Lord Haseo said:

RicOlie_2 said:

Lord Haseo said:

RicOlie_2 said:

Living according to Catholic teachings is doing a heck of a lot. Take a look at Mother Theresa, for example. For most people, it just means trying to make the lives of everyone else around you better, in simple ways, but even then, it’s only nothing if you’re not really trying…

Other than not having sex before marriage and just being a decent person in general I don’t think living by those tenets is a particularly difficult challenge.

You’ve boiled Christianity down to just about nothing, and if you see it that way, it’s no wonder it seems easy. Even simple things, like being friendly with someone who’s a jerk to you, or performing random acts of kindness whenever the opportunity shows itself are easier said than done.

Volunteering in soup kitchens; protesting unjust laws; doing every chore, school assignment, and task at your job to the best of your ability; donating a sizeable amount of what you earn to charity; being cheerful even when your day has been crappy; cleaning the toilets so another family member doesn’t have to do it instead; sacrificing your time to help an acquaintance – or a stranger – with some difficulty; visiting people in the old folks home or the hospital just to cheer them up; taking the time to talk (cheerfully, sympathetically, and patiently) to that person who just won’t leave you alone and feels the desparate need to tell you their life story; or not getting angry at the guy who cuts you off in traffic are just a few of the things that every good Christian should do consistently, so far as they are able. Do I do them all? No. Most of them, yes, but it is very difficult to take time out of your schedule and visit strangers, or to not be irritable when you’re having a bad day, so as not to make it a bad day for other people.

Being kind to someone who wronged you is hard I admit but that depends on the person. Also “easier said than done” does not equate to “difficult”. It’s only difficult if you have little free time but the acts themselves aren’t.

The most difficult part about them is doing it when you don’t want to, which is generally most of the time. Many of those things involve sacrificing one’s free time, which is easy enough to do on occasion, but not all the time.

I don’t think you’ll find that there are many people who do all, or even most, of those things (Catholics included). I do know several people who do, but the one thing they have in common is that they’re all Christian (and almost all Catholic). I have yet to meet a non-religious person, non-practising Christian, or someone from another religion who does even the majority of those things–though that’s not to say there aren’t any (and I can’t say I know a ton of atheists, agnostics, Muslims, etc. either).

I think even doing 2 or 3 good deeds a day is consistent enough to satisfy Yahweh. 2 or 3 isn’t hard at all.

It’s not about “satisfying Yahweh,” though, it’s about growing in holiness.

Post
#993549
Topic
Religion
Time

Lord Haseo said:

RicOlie_2 said:

Lord Haseo said:

RicOlie_2 said:

Living according to Catholic teachings is doing a heck of a lot. Take a look at Mother Theresa, for example. For most people, it just means trying to make the lives of everyone else around you better, in simple ways, but even then, it’s only nothing if you’re not really trying…

Other than not having sex before marriage and just being a decent person in general I don’t think living by those tenets is a particularly difficult challenge.

You’ve boiled Christianity down to just about nothing, and if you see it that way, it’s no wonder it seems easy. Even simple things, like being friendly with someone who’s a jerk to you, or performing random acts of kindness whenever the opportunity shows itself are easier said than done.

Volunteering in soup kitchens; protesting unjust laws; doing every chore, school assignment, and task at your job to the best of your ability; donating a sizeable amount of what you earn to charity; being cheerful even when your day has been crappy; cleaning the toilets so another family member doesn’t have to do it instead; sacrificing your time to help an acquaintance – or a stranger – with some difficulty; visiting people in the old folks home or the hospital just to cheer them up; taking the time to talk (cheerfully, sympathetically, and patiently) to that person who just won’t leave you alone and feels the desparate need to tell you their life story; or not getting angry at the guy who cuts you off in traffic are just a few of the things that every good Christian should do consistently, so far as they are able. Do I do them all? No. Most of them, yes, but it is very difficult to take time out of your schedule and visit strangers, or to not be irritable when you’re having a bad day, so as not to make it a bad day for other people.

Being kind to someone who wronged you is hard I admit but that depends on the person. Also “easier said than done” does not equate to “difficult”. It’s only difficult if you have little free time but the acts themselves aren’t.

The most difficult part about them is doing it when you don’t want to, which is generally most of the time. Many of those things involve sacrificing one’s free time, which is easy enough to do on occasion, but not all the time.

I don’t think you’ll find that there are many people who do all, or even most, of those things (Catholics included). I do know several people who do, but the one thing they have in common is that they’re all Christian (and almost all Catholic). I have yet to meet a non-religious person, non-practising Christian, or someone from another religion who does even the majority of those things–though that’s not to say there aren’t any (and I can’t say I know a ton of atheists, agnostics, Muslims, etc. either).

Post
#993532
Topic
Religion
Time

Lord Haseo said:

RicOlie_2 said:

Living according to Catholic teachings is doing a heck of a lot. Take a look at Mother Theresa, for example. For most people, it just means trying to make the lives of everyone else around you better, in simple ways, but even then, it’s only nothing if you’re not really trying…

Other than not having sex before marriage and just being a decent person in general I don’t think living by those tenets is a particularly difficult challenge.

You’ve boiled Christianity down to just about nothing, and if you see it that way, it’s no wonder it seems easy. Even simple things, like being friendly with someone who’s a jerk to you, or performing random acts of kindness whenever the opportunity shows itself are easier said than done.

Volunteering in soup kitchens; protesting unjust laws; doing every chore, school assignment, and task at your job to the best of your ability; donating a sizeable amount of what you earn to charity; being cheerful even when your day has been crappy; cleaning the toilets so another family member doesn’t have to do it instead; sacrificing your time to help an acquaintance – or a stranger – with some difficulty; visiting people in the old folks home or the hospital just to cheer them up; taking the time to talk (cheerfully, sympathetically, and patiently) to that person who just won’t leave you alone and feels the desparate need to tell you their life story; or not getting angry at the guy who cuts you off in traffic are just a few of the things that every good Christian should do consistently, so far as they are able. Do I do them all? No. Most of them, yes, but it is very difficult to take time out of your schedule and visit strangers, or to not be irritable when you’re having a bad day, so as not to make it a bad day for other people.

Those are just simple ways of following the teachings of my religion, and there are of course far more extreme ways, like becoming a fully-licenced doctor, and spending your time treating people in 3rd world countries for free, or selling everything you have and using all your time and money to help those in need, or joining a religious order and devoting your life to the service of others.

Also, comparing praying to asking a teacher for credit isn’t very accurate. It’s more like asking a teacher for help with homework, or to give another student extra help, because they are struggling. I could add all sorts of prayer-related things Catholics should do to the above list, because those can be difficult as well, but you no doubt think they’re a total waste of time.

Post
#993516
Topic
Religion
Time

Living according to Catholic teachings is doing a heck of a lot. Take a look at Mother Theresa, for example. For most people, it just means trying to make the lives of everyone else around you better, in simple ways, but even then, it’s only nothing if you’re not really trying…

Post
#993511
Topic
Religion
Time

Lord Haseo said:
The concept of praying is tantamount asking your teacher to give you extra credit for doing absolutely nothing. It’s cheating.

Hence why Catholics don’t believe you can get away with just praying and not actually living according to Catholic teaching (which is not to say that God ignores Protestants’ prayers).

Post
#993500
Topic
Religion
Time

Yup. I don’t offer to pray for people’s conversions, LOL.

Post
#993499
Topic
Share your good news!
Time

I wish you all the best, darthrush, however much I might disagree with your choice. I hope your family lives up to the teachings of their religion and doesn’t condemn you for not believing the same things they do.

Post
#993494
Topic
Religion
Time

TV’s Frink said:

This is interesting.

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/when-does-praying-in-public-make-others-uncomfortable/

That’s more or less the results I would have expected, though prayer before meals bothered people slightly more than I would have thought.

Out of curiosity, would you feel uncomfortable if you were invited over for dinner and your hosts prayed grace? And if so, would it make you feel more at ease if they explained that they were going to pray grace, and you could pray or abstain from doing so as you wished?

Incidentally, the only person who has mentioned anything when I pray grace before lunch at school (silently, but visibly making the sign of the cross) was a kid from a Catholic family who obviously didn’t share his parents’ religious convictions and who teased me about it. I do go to a Catholic school, though, so even non-religious kids there probably wouldn’t think much of it (I got a ton of questions about it in elementary, though).

This post has been edited.

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