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Mjolnir Mark IV

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20-Jan-2016
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13-Feb-2018
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Post
#1147686
Topic
I didn't like The Force Awakens. Should I see The Last Jedi in theaters? (NO SPOILERS)
Time

Thanks everyone for the replies. Keep them coming, and the poll voting too if you want, because I’m still pretty torn about whether to go see it or not.

@RicOlie
Thanks for such a thoughtful reply. I sincerely appreciate your effort to both help me reach a decision and protect me from spoilers. And while normally it would be more than I’d want to hear, I’m so conflicted about seeing the movie that the info you’ve given me is helpful in managing my expectations.

I just want to say a few things to set the record straight about the logic behind what I said about TFA. I realize we’re on the same side about the OT and TFA and that you’re trying to help, so don’t take this as an attack.

RicOlie_2 said:

Mjolnir Mark IV said:

  • New Force abilities break continuity with the way the Force is portrayed in the original trilogy:
    • Paralyzing a person.
    • Freezing a blaster beam in mid-flight.
    • Walking while using the Force.
    • Reading the memories of an inanimate object.

Personally, this didn’t bother me because it has some precedent in the OT (the Emperor used force lightning in ROTJ, and that hadn’t been introduced before;

It’s never explained, but it would make sense if the reason we don’t see Force lightning until ROTJ is because Vader can’t use it, because the mechanical parts of his body would act as a conduit and make the lightning backfire, perhaps even frying the mechanical components of his prosthetic limbs and his breathing apparatus.

But let’s say you’re right. I’m not saying the original trilogy is infallible. But the continuity breaks in the OT are significantly smaller than those in TFA, and even more importantly, the presence of a continuity break in the OT is no excuse to continue creating new continuity breaks in the sequel trilogy.

RicOlie_2 said:
I see no reason why we should have seen every force power used).

I agree. But the problem is not simply adding something new we haven’t seen before. It’s adding something new that contradicts what we have seen.

  • Paralyzing a person. If this is possible, then why wouldn’t Vader paralyze Luke in TESB? Since his goal is to capture Luke alive, paralyzing him at the carbon freeze chamber would have been the perfect opportunity, especially since he’s clearly stronger than Luke in TESB.

  • Freezing a blaster beam in mid-flight. If this is possible, then why wouldn’t Vader do this to the blaster shot that Han fires in the Cloud City dining hall in TESB? There’s no use risking a deflection going willy-nilly in a confined space if you don’t need it to, especially when you want Han Solo alive to use as bait to lure Luke.

  • Walking while using the Force. If this is possible, Vader surely would have done it when hurling wall fixtures and random objects at Luke in TESB.

  • Reading the memories of an inanimate object. If this is the way the Force works, then why isn’t Luke assaulted by a montage of his father’s memories when he receives Anakin’s lightsaber from Obi-Wan in ANH?

Some of these inconsistencies also combine to create continuity breaks. For example, if one’s undivided attention is not required to use telekinesis, and if paralysis is possible, why wouldn’t Luke paralyze the last stormtrooper on the speeder bike in ROTJ, rather than opting for the more risky maneuver of slamming his speeder into the stormtrooper’s?

There are many ways to create an exciting sequel without violating the limitations that have been established in previous films. In fact, limitations can even act as a guide and expedite the creative process by increasing the speed of decision making. Creating a story that breaks the continuity of previous material means one of two things about the flimmakers, neither of which are good:

  1. They’ve taken the easy way out of solving a problem with the story. This means someone is either lazy, careless, or incompetent.
  2. They’re arrogant enough to think they can re-write the rules, which is just plain disrespectful to the filmmakers who worked hard to establish a set of consistent rules in the original trilogy. Anyone who dismantles well-crafted continuity because of an oversized ego is…well, an asshole.

RicOlie_2 said:

Mjolnir Mark IV said:

  • The hologram technology is too advanced.

Look at how much our cellphone technology has advanced in the past 30 years…I see no reason why holograms shouldn’t also be slightly more advanced in the ST.

Demonstrating how the galaxy has flourished in the absence of the Empire is a good concept if that’s the idea, but using the hologram as an example is problematic because the more realistic you make a hologram, the more you run the risk of losing the distinction between characters that are actually present and characters that are projected holograms. I think in this case, what communicates clearly on screen is more important than how far technology would logically advance over time. And since nobody’s going to complain about the hologram technology not advancing, I find the choice that was made somewhat baffling.

What fits the creative vision of the universe is also important to consider. The more polished you make the technology, the more you risk the world not feeling like the Star Wars universe.

RicOlie_2 said:
They aren’t really that much better anyway.

Well, it’s a nitpick. And I’ll admit my memory isn’t particularly clear with this detail anyway (it has been two years), so you could be right. I’d have to go back and check to be sure, but to be honest, I’m afraid that simply scanning through the movie will cause a relapse in the PTSD I’m still battling.

This post has been edited.

Post
#1145012
Topic
I didn't like The Force Awakens. Should I see The Last Jedi in theaters? (NO SPOILERS)
Time

The main reason I don’t like TFA is this:

If the filmmakers want to add something to the sequel trilogy that changes the original trilogy, that’s fine as long as it enhances the original trilogy. But if it neither enhances nor weakens the original trilogy, it may or may not be the right choice. And if the new addition even goes so far as to weaken the original trilogy, that is an unequivocal sign that the change should not be made, and that a different approach should be taken to the narrative. And there are too many places in TFA that weaken the original trilogy.

Specifically why I don’t like it (The Force Awakens SPOILERS):

  • Rey’s rapid mastery of the Force undermines the hard work that was put in to make Luke’s transition from novice to master a believable one in the original trilogy, and it diminishes his accomplishments.
  • Rey learning the Force with little to no guidance undermines the purpose of having a mentor in both the original trilogy and the prequel trilogy.
  • New Force abilities break continuity with the way the Force is portrayed in the original trilogy:
    • Paralyzing a person.
    • Freezing a blaster beam in mid-flight.
    • Walking while using the Force.
    • Reading the memories of an inanimate object.
  • Lack of originality. The filmmakers played it far too safe by duplicating too many narrative elements from previous Star Wars films.
  • Having Han revert back to smuggling undermines all of the hard work that was done to develop his character in the original trilogy. I would have preferred to see him continue to evolve as a character rather than regress.
  • The circumstances of Han’s death should be more dramatic or more exciting than a talk. Especially considering that the Star Wars series is a space opera.
  • As a character, Kylo Ren is a weak villain. And the comic relief in his scenes doesn’t help.
  • Rey is overpowered even if we pretend for a moment that the original trilogy doesn’t exist. As a novice with the Force, she is somehow able to overpower a trained Sith at telekinesis.
  • The shift in humor to a satirical sitcom style is out of place for Star Wars. It’s the kind of humor that makes me roll my eyes when it’s not in a sitcom like Friends.
  • Maz Kanata is out of place. Just because Disney owns Star Wars is no reason to put a Disney character in a Star Wars movie. I was actually surprised when she didn’t break into song to explain the Force to Rey.
  • The film feels incomplete because there are too many important narrative threads that remain unresolved by the end of it. Key words: “too many.” I’m fine with being given a puzzle to solve, but the problem is that we aren’t given enough of the jigsaw pieces—or that we are given ones that should have been saved for later. And anyway, Star Wars is supposed to be a space opera, not a mind-bender.
  • Luke’s part in the film isn’t right. It would be better if he intervenes in the fight at the end to save Rey and Finn (preferably against an uninjured Kylo Ren). But if it has to be Rey who defeats Kylo Ren, there should be no cameo with Luke at the end. It achieves nothing more than the creation of an offbeat ending. They should have saved that scene for the beginning of The Last Jedi. It’s like ending The Empire Strikes Back with R2-D2 and C-3PO arriving at Jabba’s palace—it just doesn’t make any sense in the episodic format of Star Wars (to compare, The Lord of the Rings is a single story split into three parts, as opposed to three episodes that make up a story). The only reason for Luke’s cameo that I can come up with is that Disney wanted to sell more tickets by having Mark Hamill’s name in the billing—and that’s an insidious incentive when it comes at the cost of the narrative.

And that brings me to another point. There are too many decisions that appear to be made for the sake of making more money at the box office, but at the expense of the narrative: duplicating proven story elements from previous movies to play it safe, reverting Han’s character back to what it was in movies that have proven to be successful, and tacking on the appearance of Luke. Even Han’s death felt like it was tacked on to check the drama checkbox on the Star Wars checklist, rather than to tell a good story.

Nitpicks:

  • The decision to change Force terminology by replacing the word “good” with “light” proves to be problematic in certain sentences. It’s better to use either of the two words depending on context, rather than rigidly sticking to just one.
  • Changing the design of the lightsaber for Kylo Ren is fiddling with perfection. The original lighsaber beam is a perfect design, both visually and sonically. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. And having cross-guard beams on a lightsaber is just stupid.
  • It was predictable, and I mean well beyond the fact that the good guys are going to blow up the “Deathstar.”
  • Kylo Ren doesn’t need a mask. Cosplaying villains aren’t intimidating.
  • Han Solo is too old to be gun slinging. And he’s definitely too old to be shooting without even looking what he’s aiming at.
  • The hologram technology is too advanced.
  • There are gaps in the worldbuilding logic of the narrative, such as the storm trooper’s melee weapon, or Finn’s fencing skills.
  • The transition from the final scene into the credits music was not smooth.
Post
#1144246
Topic
I didn't like The Force Awakens. Should I see The Last Jedi in theaters? (NO SPOILERS)
Time

I love the original trilogy. I cringed at the prequel trilogy. But I was so disgusted with The Force Awakens that I haven’t been able to bring myself to re-watch it even once.

For those of you who dislike TFA and have seen The Last Jedi, should I see The Last Jedi in theaters? Or should I wait for the home video release? Or should I avoid the movie entirely?

If you can limit your answer to a simple yes, no, or never, that would be safest, as I am hardcore when it comes to spoilers, and even consider it a spoiler when expectations are spoiled.

For convenience, you can also take the poll here, but if you take it and post your answer to this thread, please specify you have taken the poll so I don’t count your answer twice:
http://www.strawpoll.me/14646756

Post
#1078726
Topic
Original Trilogy: Limited Edition (2006) - DVD Subtitles
Time

Forty years ago in a galaxy far, far from far away…
STAR WARS was released!

Happy 40th Anniversary!

Use the files included in this download to update your original trilogy DVDs so that the look of the subtitles almost perfectly matches their original appearance in theaters. No re-encoding is required, so the video and audio of your DVDs will be left completely untouched, and there will be absolutely no loss in quality.

DOWNLOAD

http://drive.google.com/uc?export=view&id=0B4fNpxiuCvtEbXhQRkEzcXpVNkU
http://drive.google.com/uc?export=view&id=0B4fNpxiuCvtEY3JNOFAtNkVrTk0

DOWNLOAD

The font I used to create the subtitles is:
ITC Franklin Gothic LT Medium Condensed

If anyone knows of a font that is a closer match to the original in-theater appearance of the subtitles, please let me know! The font I’m using is close, but isn’t quite perfect.

The circle is now complete! Use these subtitles together with these DVD covers and disc labels, and with their combined strength, you can end this destructive conflict between theatrical release and home video, and bring order to the galaxy!

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