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Replies get included in the quote layout

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If someone quotes a post, but doesn’t include a blank line between the post they are quoting and their own, it looks like their response is part of the post they are quoting.

see: http://originaltrilogy.com/topic/Harmys-THE-EMPIRE-STRIKES-BACK-Despecialized-Edition-HD-MKV-and-AVCHD-v20-NOW-AVAILABLE/id/12511/page/138#1087312

If you quote that, you can see that it is indented with a different level, but the style it is rendered with makes it look like it isn’t.

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Is this new? I don’t know if this is a bug, so much as the way Markdown works.

The things you pwn end up pwning you.

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It was new to me a few weeks ago, but no idea if it is new or not.

It isn’t correct as Frink says, and makes the types of replies a real challenge to read (so much that I usually don’t even read them)

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yhwx said:

I think it’s that people are typing their responses within the boundaries of the quote.
I used to think that

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TV’s Frink said:

yhwx said:

I think it’s that people are typing their responses within the boundaries of the quote.

Yeah, I assumed that too, but after dahmage posted about it I went and looked at the quote and he’s right, it shouldn’t be happening.
g

JEDIT: I think I got it now. You need a newline between the quote and the response. I guess, for some reason, this isn’t happening with some posts.

This post has been edited.

Nothing is so perfect that it can’t be complained about.

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When you insert a single line break in the editor, it creates a single line break within the current paragraph. Two new lines are required for a new paragraph, which is why the last line in these examples ends up bundled with the quote. Pretty sure this is by design in Markdown.

However, I think I can mitigate it by inserting an empty bracket at the end of the quoted post in the reply form. That way, even if this happens…

> Quoted text.
>
Reply here.

…it’ll work.

The things you pwn end up pwning you.

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https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/syntax#p

PARAGRAPHS AND LINE BREAKS

A paragraph is simply one or more consecutive lines of text, separated by one or more blank lines. (A blank line is any line that looks like a blank line — a line containing nothing but spaces or tabs is considered blank.) Normal paragraphs should not be indented with spaces or tabs.

The implication of the “one or more consecutive lines of text” rule is that Markdown supports “hard-wrapped” text paragraphs. This differs significantly from most other text-to-HTML formatters (including Movable Type’s “Convert Line Breaks” option) which translate every line break character in a paragraph into a <br /> tag.

When you do want to insert a <br /> break tag using Markdown, you end a line with two or more spaces, then type return.

Yes, this takes a tad more effort to create a <br />, but a simplistic “every line break is a <br />” rule wouldn’t work for Markdown. Markdown’s email-style blockquoting and multi-paragraph list items work best — and look better — when you format them with hard breaks.

Nothing is so perfect that it can’t be complained about.

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yhwx said:

https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/syntax#p

PARAGRAPHS AND LINE BREAKS

A paragraph is simply one or more consecutive lines of text, separated by one or more blank lines. (A blank line is any line that looks like a blank line — a line containing nothing but spaces or tabs is considered blank.) Normal paragraphs should not be indented with spaces or tabs.

The implication of the “one or more consecutive lines of text” rule is that Markdown supports “hard-wrapped” text paragraphs. This differs significantly from most other text-to-HTML formatters (including Movable Type’s “Convert Line Breaks” option) which translate every line break character in a paragraph into a <br /> tag.

When you do want to insert a <br /> break tag using Markdown, you end a line with two or more spaces, then type return.

Yes, this takes a tad more effort to create a <br />, but a simplistic “every line break is a <br />” rule wouldn’t work for Markdown. Markdown’s email-style blockquoting and multi-paragraph list items work best — and look better — when you format them with hard breaks.

This doesn’t align with our implementation. Inserting a hard line break does create a <br> tag in the HTML, because asking users to end a line with two spaces to insert a break isn’t intuitive at all; it’s a simple config option in the parser we use. However, a single line break doesn’t start a new paragraph, therefore the first line following the quote is included in the last paragraph within the quote. This is also unintuitive in my opinion, but that’s what the parser does (and what other implementations do from what I’ve seen).

You should probably avoid Gruber’s definition of Markdown. It’s outdated and some of his rules don’t apply any more.

The things you pwn end up pwning you.

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Jay said:

When you insert a single line break in the editor, it creates a single line break within the current paragraph. Two new lines are required for a new paragraph, which is why the last line in these examples ends up bundled with the quote. Pretty sure this is by design in Markdown.

However, I think I can mitigate it by inserting an empty bracket at the end of the quoted post in the reply form. That way, even if this happens…

> Quoted text.
>
Reply here.

…it’ll work.

That will probably help mitigate it. Not sure how much time you need to spend on something that sounds like markdown’s issue.

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